Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Tiny

Tiny Quotes (9 quotes)

A poet is, after all, a sort of scientist, but engaged in a qualitative science in which nothing is measurable. He lives with data that cannot be numbered, and his experiments can be done only once. The information in a poem is, by definition, not reproducible. ... He becomes an equivalent of scientist, in the act of examining and sorting the things popping in [to his head], finding the marks of remote similarity, points of distant relationship, tiny irregularities that indicate that this one is really the same as that one over there only more important. Gauging the fit, he can meticulously place pieces of the universe together, in geometric configurations that are as beautiful and balanced as crystals.
In The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974, 1995), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (24)  |  Beauty (88)  |  Configuration (3)  |  Crystal (22)  |  Data (59)  |  Definition (86)  |  Distance (26)  |  Engagement (4)  |  Equivalent (7)  |  Examination (47)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Fit (12)  |  Geometry (68)  |  Importance (106)  |  Indication (15)  |  Information (56)  |  Irregularity (5)  |  Life (460)  |  Mark (14)  |  Measurement (112)  |  Nothing (89)  |  Number (90)  |  Once (2)  |  Piece (13)  |  Poem (76)  |  Poet (26)  |  Point (29)  |  Qualitative (4)  |  Relationship (37)  |  Remote (11)  |  Reproducibility (2)  |  Science (875)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Similarity (14)  |  Sort (7)  |  Thing (27)  |  Thought (170)  |  Universe (291)

Across the road from my cabin was a huge clear-cut—hundreds of acres of massive spruce stumps interspersed with tiny Douglas firs—products of what they call “Reforestation,” which I guess makes the spindly firs en masse a “Reforest,” which makes an individual spindly fir a “Refir,” which means you could say that Weyerhauser, who owns the joint, has Refir Madness, since they think that sawing down 200-foot-tall spruces and replacing them with puling 2-foot Refirs is no different from farming beans or corn or alfalfa. They even call the towering spires they wipe from the Earth's face forever a “crop”--as if they'd planted the virgin forest! But I'm just a fisherman and may be missing some deeper significance in their nomenclature and stranger treatment of primordial trees.
In David James Duncan, The River Why (1983), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Acre (3)  |  Bean (3)  |  Call (11)  |  Corn (4)  |  Crop (10)  |  Deeper (2)  |  Difference (135)  |  Douglas Fir (2)  |  Earth (250)  |  Face (23)  |  Fisherman (2)  |  Forever (14)  |  Hundred (11)  |  Individual (59)  |  Madness (15)  |  Miss (5)  |  Nomenclature (102)  |  Plant (96)  |  Primordial (2)  |  Product (33)  |  Reforestation (2)  |  Replacement (8)  |  Road (18)  |  Significance (30)  |  Spire (3)  |  Stranger (7)  |  Stump (2)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Treatment (61)  |  Tree (88)

An infinity of these tiny animals defoliate our plants, our trees, our fruits... they attack our houses, our fabrics, our furniture, our clothing, our furs ... He who in studying all the different species of insects that are injurious to us, would seek means of preventing them from harming us, would seek to cause them to perish, proposes for his goal important tasks indeed.
In J. B. Gough, 'Rene-Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur', in Charles Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1975), Vol. 11, 332.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (143)  |  Attack (13)  |  Clothing (5)  |  Difference (135)  |  Fabric (6)  |  Fruit (31)  |  Fur (5)  |  Furniture (3)  |  Goal (36)  |  Harm (17)  |  House (19)  |  Importance (106)  |  Infinity (44)  |  Injury (9)  |  Insect (38)  |  Means (25)  |  Perish (11)  |  Plant (96)  |  Prevention (26)  |  Proposition (28)  |  Seeking (17)  |  Species (96)  |  Study (157)  |  Task (32)  |  Tree (88)

Human personality resembles a coral reef: a large hard/dead structure built and inhabited by tiny soft/live animals. The hard/dead part of our personality consists of habits, memories, and compulsions and will probably be explained someday by some sort of extended computer metaphor. The soft/live part of personality consists of moment-to-moment direct experience of being. This aspect of personality is familiar but somewhat ineffable and has eluded all attempts at physical explanation.
Quoted in article 'Nick Herbert', in Gale Cengage Learning, Contemporary Authors Online (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (143)  |  Aspect (16)  |  Attempt (41)  |  Being (34)  |  Build (23)  |  Compulsion (6)  |  Computer (51)  |  Coral Reef (5)  |  Dead (16)  |  Direct (9)  |  Experience (132)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Extend (6)  |  Familiar (5)  |  Habit (42)  |  Hard (18)  |  Human (168)  |  Inhabitant (7)  |  Large (22)  |  Life (460)  |  Memory (42)  |  Metaphor (9)  |  Moment (21)  |  Personality (19)  |  Physical (28)  |  Probability (56)  |  Resemblance (15)  |  Soft (3)  |  Someday (3)  |  Structure (104)

Known as the biosphere to scientists and as the creation to theologians, all of life together consists of a membrane around earth so thin that it cannot be seen edgewise from a satellite yet so prodigiously diverse that only a tiny fraction of species have been discovered and named.
'Vanishing Before Our Eyes', Time (26 Apr 2000).
Science quotes on:  |  Biosphere (7)  |  Creation (129)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Diversity (32)  |  Earth (250)  |  Fraction (4)  |  Life (460)  |  Membrane (6)  |  Name (58)  |  Prodigious (4)  |  Satellite (12)  |  Species (96)  |  Theologian (11)  |  Thin (3)

Let him look at that dazzling light hung aloft as an eternal lamp to lighten the universe; let him behold the earth, a mere dot compared with the vast circuit which that orb describes, and stand amazed to find that the vast circuit itself is but a very fine point compared with the orbit traced by the stars as they roll their course on high. But if our vision halts there, let imagination pass beyond; it will fail to form a conception long before Nature fails to supply material. The whole visible world is but an imperceptible speck in the ample bosom of Nature. No notion comes near it. Though we may extend our thought beyond imaginable space, yet compared with reality we bring to birth mere atoms. Nature is an infinite sphere whereof the centre is everywhere, the circumference nowhere. In short, imagination is brought to silence at the thought, and that is the most perceptible sign of the all-power of God.
Let man reawake and consider what he is compared with the reality of things; regard himself lost in this remote corner of Nature; and from the tiny cell where he lodges, to wit the Universe, weigh at their true worth earth, kingdoms, towns, himself. What is a man face to face with infinity?
Pensées (1670), Section 1, aphorism 43. In H. F. Stewart (ed.), Pascal's Pensées (1950), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazement (7)  |  Ample (2)  |  Atom (164)  |  Behold (3)  |  Beyond (19)  |  Birth (47)  |  Bosom (5)  |  Cell (90)  |  Centre (13)  |  Circuit (10)  |  Circumference (5)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Conception (29)  |  Consideration (38)  |  Corner (13)  |  Course (25)  |  Dazzling (7)  |  Earth (250)  |  Everywhere (4)  |  Face (23)  |  Failure (58)  |  God (234)  |  Halt (5)  |  Himself (9)  |  Imagination (130)  |  Imperceptibility (2)  |  Infinity (44)  |  Kingdom (18)  |  Light (117)  |  Look (32)  |  Lost (11)  |  Material (60)  |  Nature (534)  |  Notion (15)  |  Nowhere (8)  |  Orb (3)  |  Pass (20)  |  Perception (21)  |  Reality (67)  |  Regard (17)  |  Remote (11)  |  Roll (3)  |  Sign (18)  |  Silence (12)  |  Space (68)  |  Speck (5)  |  Sphere (12)  |  Star (132)  |  Supply (15)  |  Thought (170)  |  Town (11)  |  Universe (291)  |  Vast (20)  |  Visibility (6)  |  Vision (21)  |  Worth (30)

The Europeans and the Americans are not throwing $10 billion down this gigantic tube for nothing. We're exploring the very forefront of physics and cosmology with the Large Hadron Collider because we want to have a window on creation, we want to recreate a tiny piece of Genesis to unlock some of the greatest secrets of the universe.
Quoted by Alexander G. Higgins (AP), in 'Particle Collider: Black Hole or Crucial Machine', The Journal Gazette (7 Aug 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  America (41)  |  Billion (24)  |  Cosmology (11)  |  Creation (129)  |  Dollar (11)  |  Europe (16)  |  Exploration (48)  |  Genesis (10)  |  Gigantic (6)  |  Greatest (23)  |  Large Hadron Collider (6)  |  Nothing (89)  |  Physics (156)  |  Piece (13)  |  Recreation (6)  |  Research (360)  |  Secret (44)  |  Throw (11)  |  Tube (2)  |  Universe (291)  |  Unlocking (2)  |  Window (11)

The known is finite, the unknown infinite; spiritually we find ourselves on a tiny island in the middle of a boundless ocean of the inexplicable. It is our task, from generation to generation, to drain a small amount of additional land.
As given in Herbert and W. Roesky and Klaud Mφckel, translated from the original German by T.N. Mitchell and W.E. Russey, Chemical Curiosities: Spectacular Experiments and Inspired Quotes (1996), 212. It is a restatement of an original quote from concluding remarks to a chapter by Thomas Huxley, 'On the Reception of the ‘Origin of Species’', the last chapter in Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887), Vol. 1, 557. Webmaster suggests, the original Huxley quote was translated for the original German text, and when that was translated for the English edition, the quote morphed into into the form above.
Science quotes on:  |  Additional (2)  |  Amount (11)  |  Boundless (6)  |  Drain (4)  |  Finite (13)  |  Generation (56)  |  Inexplicable (2)  |  Infinite (39)  |  Island (8)  |  Known (5)  |  Land (27)  |  Middle (7)  |  Ocean (56)  |  Small (35)  |  Task (32)  |  Unknown (40)

The size and age of the Cosmos are beyond ordinary human understanding. Lost somewhere between immensity and eternity is our tiny planetary home.
Cosmos (1981), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (60)  |  Cosmos (23)  |  Eternity (22)  |  Home (19)  |  Human (168)  |  Immensity (7)  |  Lost (11)  |  Ordinary (19)  |  Planet (84)  |  Size (21)  |  Understanding (231)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton