Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Taste

Taste Quotes (16 quotes)

A little Learning is a dang'rous Thing;
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian Spring:
There shallow Draughts intoxicate the Brain,
And drinking largely sobers us again.
In An Essay on Criticism (1711), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (106)  |  Danger (32)  |  Deep (17)  |  Drink (15)  |  Intoxication (2)  |  Learning (130)  |  Sobriety (2)  |  Spring (17)

As the sense of smell is so intimately connected with that of taste, it is not surprising that an excessively bad odour should excite wretching or vomitting in some persons.
The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals
Science quotes on:  |  Smell (9)

How did I discover saccharin? Well, it was partly by accident and partly by study. I had worked a long time on the compound radicals and substitution products of coal tar... One evening I was so interested in my laboratory that I forgot about my supper till quite late, and then rushed off for a meal without stopping to wash my hands. I sat down, broke a piece of bread, and put it to my lips. It tasted unspeakably sweet. I did not ask why it was so, probably because I thought it was some cake or sweetmeat. I rinsed my mouth with water, and dried my moustache with my napkin, when, to my surprise the napkin tasted sweeter than the bread. Then I was puzzled. I again raised my goblet, and, as fortune would have it, applied my mouth where my fingers had touched it before. The water seemed syrup. It flashed on me that I was the cause of the singular universal sweetness, and I accordingly tasted the end of my thumb, and found it surpassed any confectionery I had ever eaten. I saw the whole thing at once. I had discovered some coal tar substance which out-sugared sugar. I dropped my dinner, and ran back to the laboratory. There, in my excitement, I tasted the contents of every beaker and evaporating dish on the table.
Interview with American Analyst. Reprinted in Pacific Record of Medicine and Surgery (1886), 1, No. 3, 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (25)  |  Artificial (13)  |  Bread (7)  |  Cake (2)  |  Coal Tar (2)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Finger (14)  |  Fortune (15)  |  Meal (9)  |  Mouth (10)  |  Puzzle (16)  |  Research (360)  |  Saccharin (2)  |  Serendipity (10)  |  Sugar (8)  |  Sweetness (4)  |  Thumb (4)  |  Touch (19)  |  Water (122)

I happen to be a kind of monkey. I have a monkeylike curiosity that makes me want to feel, smell, and taste things which arouse my curiosity, then to take them apart. It was born in me. Not everybody is like that, but a scientific researchist should be. Any fool can show me an experiment is useless. I want a man who will try it and get something out of it.
Quoted in Guy Suits, 'Willis Rodney Whitney', National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs (1960), 357.
Science quotes on:  |  Apart (3)  |  Arousal (2)  |  Birth (47)  |  Curiosity (52)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Feeling (47)  |  Fool (32)  |  Monkey (26)  |  Research (360)  |  Scientific (55)  |  Smell (9)  |  Something (9)  |  Take (4)  |  Try (34)  |  Uselessness (19)

In a democracy dissent is an act of faith. Like medicine, the test of its value is not in its taste, but its effects.
Speech to the U.S. Senate (21 Apr 1966). In Tristram Coffin, Senator Fulbright; Portrait of a Public Philosopher (1966), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Democracy (5)  |  Dissent (5)  |  Medicine (185)

It is as fatal as it is cowardly to blink facts because they are not to our taste.
In 'Science and Man', Fragments of Science (1879), Vol. 2, 362.
Science quotes on:  |  Fact (325)  |  Fatality (2)

Our novice runs the risk of failure without additional traits: a strong inclination toward originality, a taste for research, and a desire to experience the incomparable gratification associated with the act of discovery itself.
In Santiago Ramσn y Cajal, Neely Swanson (trans.) and Larry W. Swanson (trans.), Advice for a Young Investigator (2004), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (22)  |  Addition (12)  |  Association (8)  |  Desire (46)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Experience (132)  |  Failure (58)  |  Gratification (8)  |  Inclination (10)  |  Novice (2)  |  Originality (7)  |  Research (360)  |  Risk (13)  |  Strength (25)  |  Trait (10)  |  Without (11)

So-called extraordinary events always split into two extremes naturalists who have not witnessed them: those who believe blindly and those who do not believe at all. The latter have always in mind the story of the golden goose; if the facts lie slightly beyond the limits of their knowledge, they relegate them immediately to fables. The former have a secret taste for marvels because they seem to expand Nature; they use their imagination with pleasure to find explanations. To remain doubtful is given to naturalists who keep a middle path between the two extremes. They calmly examine facts; they refer to logic for help; they discuss probabilities; they do not scoff at anything, not even errors, because they serve at least the history of the human mind; finally, they report rather than judge; they rarely decide unless they have good evidence.
Quoted in Albert V. Carozzi, Histoire des sciences de la terre entre 1790 et 1815 vue à travers les documents inédités de la Societé de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de Genève, trans. Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi. (1990), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (139)  |  Blindness (5)  |  Decision (30)  |  Discussion (17)  |  Doubtful (2)  |  Error (152)  |  Event (49)  |  Evidence (83)  |  Expansion (18)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Extraordinary (18)  |  Extreme (17)  |  Fable (3)  |  Fact (325)  |  Final (13)  |  Find (50)  |  Gold (19)  |  Goose (4)  |  History (156)  |  Human (168)  |  Imagination (130)  |  Immediately (3)  |  Judgment (39)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Limit (34)  |  Marvel (16)  |  Mind (272)  |  Naturalist (27)  |  Nature (534)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Probability (56)  |  Rare (14)  |  Remain (18)  |  Report (15)  |  Secret (44)  |  Service (27)  |  So-Called (5)  |  Split (4)  |  Story (16)  |  Witness (9)

The Qualities then that are in Bodies rightly considered, are of Three sorts.
First, the Bulk, Figure, Number, Situation, and Motion, or Rest of their solid Parts; those are in them, whether we perceive them or no; and when they are of that size, that we can discover them, we have by these an Idea of the thing, as it is in it self, as is plain in artificial things. These I call primary Qualities.
Secondly, The Power that is in any Body, by Reason of its insensible primary Qualities, to operate after a peculiar manner on any of our Senses, and thereby produce in us the different Ideas of several Colours, Sounds, Smells, Tastes, etc. These are usually called sensible Qualities.
Thirdly, The Power that is in any Body, by Reason of the particular Constitution of its primary Qualities, to make such a change in the Bulk, Figure, Texture, and Motion of another Body, as to make it operate on our Senses, differently from what it did before. Thus the Sun has a Power to make Wax white, and Fire to make Lead fluid. These are usually called Powers.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), Book 2, Chapter 8, Section 23, 140-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Bulk (3)  |  Colour (32)  |  Figure (13)  |  Fire (59)  |  Idea (226)  |  Lead (33)  |  Motion (64)  |  Number (90)  |  Quality (29)  |  Rest (28)  |  Sense (104)  |  Situation (21)  |  Smell (9)  |  Sound (21)  |  Sun (115)  |  Wax (3)

The issue is not to teach [a child] the sciences, but to give him the taste for loving them.
Émile, or, On Education, new translation by Alan Bloom (1979), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (90)  |  Education (177)  |  Issue (14)  |  Love (64)  |  Science (875)  |  Teach (19)

The real value of science is in the getting, and those who have tasted the pleasure of discovery alone know what science is. A problem solved is dead. A world without problems to be solved would be devoid of science.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (13)  |  Devoid (3)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Problem (180)  |  Reality (67)  |  Science (875)  |  Solution (109)  |  Without (11)  |  World (231)

This boulder seemed like a curious volume, regularly paged, with a few extracts from older works. Bacon tells us that “some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested.” Of the last honour I think the boulder fully worthy.
In The Story of a Boulder: or, Gleanings from the Note-book of a Field Geologist (1858), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Sir Francis Bacon (127)  |  Book (100)  |  Boulder (2)  |  Curious (6)  |  Extract (3)  |  Geology (145)  |  Honour (20)  |  Page (9)  |  Swallow (5)  |  Worthy (4)

Through seven figures come sensations for a man; there is hearing for sounds, sight for the visible, nostril for smell, tongue for pleasant or unpleasant tastes, mouth for speech, body for touch, passages outwards and inwards for hot or cold breath. Through these come knowledge or lack of it.
Regimen, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1931), Vol. 4, 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (88)  |  Breath (15)  |  Hearing (19)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Mouth (10)  |  Nostril (3)  |  Sense (104)  |  Sight (12)  |  Smell (9)  |  Speech (19)  |  Tongue (8)  |  Touch (19)

We have reason not to be afraid of the machine, for there is always constructive change, the enemy of machines, making them change to fit new conditions.
We suffer not from overproduction but from undercirculation. You have heard of technocracy. I wish I had those fellows for my competitors. I'd like to take the automobile it is said they predicted could be made now that would last fifty years. Even if never used, this automobile would not be worth anything except to a junkman in ten years, because of the changes in men's tastes and ideas. This desire for change is an inherent quality in human nature, so that the present generation must not try to crystallize the needs of the future ones.
We have been measuring too much in terms of the dollar. What we should do is think in terms of useful materials—things that will be of value to us in our daily life.
In 'Quotation Marks: Against Technocracy', New York Times (1 Han 1933), E4.
Science quotes on:  |  Afraid (7)  |  Automobile (11)  |  Change (133)  |  Circulation (12)  |  Competitor (2)  |  Condition (68)  |  Construction (36)  |  Daily Life (3)  |  Desire (46)  |  Doing (26)  |  Dollar (11)  |  Enemy (26)  |  Fifty (4)  |  Future (110)  |  Generation (56)  |  Human Nature (34)  |  Idea (226)  |  Inherent (17)  |  Junk (2)  |  Machine (56)  |  Measurement (112)  |  Need (57)  |  New (107)  |  Prediction (48)  |  Present (36)  |  Production (72)  |  Quality (29)  |  Reason (173)  |  Suffering (20)  |  Ten (3)  |  Term (34)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Use (54)  |  Usefulness (54)  |  Value (63)  |  Wish (18)  |  Worth (30)  |  Year (69)

When carbon (C), Oxygen (o) and hydrogen (H) atoms bond in a certain way to form sugar, the resulting compound has a sweet taste. The sweetness resides neither in the C, nor in the O, nor in the H; it resides in the pattern that emerges from their interaction. It is an emergent property. Moreover, strictly speaking, is not a property of the chemical bonds. It is a sensory experience that arises when the sugar molecules interact with the chemistry of our taste buds, which in turns causes a set of neurons to fire in a certain way. The experience of sweetness emerges from that neural activity.
In The Hidden Connections (2002), 116-117.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (48)  |  Carbon (28)  |  Chemical Bond (5)  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Compound (35)  |  Emergence (17)  |  Experience (132)  |  Hydrogen (25)  |  Interaction (11)  |  Molecule (82)  |  Neuron (7)  |  Oxygen (34)  |  Pattern (18)  |  Reside (4)  |  Result (129)  |  Sense (104)  |  Sugar (8)  |  Sweetness (4)

[Vestiges begins] from principles which are at variance with all sober inductive truth. The sober facts of geology shuffled, so as to play a rogue’s game; phrenology (that sinkhole of human folly and prating coxcombry); spontaneous generation; transmutation of species; and I know not what; all to be swallowed, without tasting and trying, like so much horse-physic!! Gross credulity and rank infidelity joined in unlawful marriage, and breeding a deformed progeny of unnatural conclusions!
Letter to Charles Lyell (9 Apr 1845). In John Willis Clark and Thomas McKenny Hughes (eds.), The Life and Letters of the Reverend Adam Sedgwick (1890), Vol. 2, 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Breeding (5)  |  Conclusion (74)  |  Credulity (5)  |  Deformation (3)  |  Fact (325)  |  Folly (10)  |  Game (28)  |  Generation (56)  |  Geology (145)  |  Human (168)  |  Induction (22)  |  Infidelity (2)  |  Marriage (19)  |  Phrenology (4)  |  Principle (97)  |  Progeny (4)  |  Shuffle (3)  |  Sober (5)  |  Species (96)  |  Spontaneous (5)  |  Swallow (5)  |  Transmutation (10)  |  Truth (450)  |  Try (34)  |  Unnatural (6)  |  Variance (2)  |  Vestiges (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton