Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it... That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Shift

Shift Quotes (9 quotes)

A grove of giant redwoods or sequoias should be kept just as we keep a great or beautiful cathedral. The extermination of the passenger pigeon meant that mankind was just so much poorer; exactly as in the case of the destruction of the cathedral at Rheims. And to lose the chance to see frigate-birds soaring in circles above the storm, or a file of pelicans winging their way homeward across the crimson afterglow of the sunset, or a myriad terns flashing in the bright light of midday as they hover in a shifting maze above the beach—why, the loss is like the loss of a gallery of the masterpieces of the artists of old time.
In A Book-Lover's Holidays in the Open (1916), 316-317.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (18)  |  Beach (7)  |  Bird (54)  |  Cathedral (8)  |  Circle (10)  |  Conservation (40)  |  Destruction (46)  |  Extermination (5)  |  Extinction (37)  |  Flash (8)  |  Grove (3)  |  Loss (43)  |  Mankind (105)  |  Maze (6)  |  Myriad (8)  |  Poor (15)  |  Redwood (6)  |  Sequoia (2)  |  Soaring (2)  |  Storm (13)  |  Tree (81)

At the beginning of its existence as a science, biology was forced to take cognizance of the seemingly boundless variety of living things, for no exact study of life phenomena was possible until the apparent chaos of the distinct kinds of organisms had been reduced to a rational system. Systematics and morphology, two predominantly descriptive and observational disciplines, took precedence among biological sciences during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. More recently physiology has come to the foreground, accompanied by the introduction of quantitative methods and by a shift from the observationalism of the past to a predominance of experimentation.
In Genetics and the Origin of Species (1937, 1982), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (5)  |  19th Century (7)  |  Biology (82)  |  Boundless (6)  |  Chaos (33)  |  Description (40)  |  Discipline (15)  |  Experiment (367)  |  Foreground (2)  |  Morphology (11)  |  Observation (256)  |  Organism (66)  |  Physiology (40)  |  Predominance (2)  |  Rational (17)  |  Systematic (7)  |  Variety (28)

How then did we come to the “standard model”? And how has it supplanted other theories, like the steady state model? It is a tribute to the essential objectivity of modern astrophysics that this consensus has been brought about, not by shifts in philosophical preference or by the influence of astrophysical mandarins, but by the pressure of empirical data.
In The First Three Minutes: A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe (1977), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Astrophysics (9)  |  Consensus (2)  |  Data (53)  |  Empiricism (13)  |  Essential (41)  |  Influence (46)  |  Modern (42)  |  Objectivity (8)  |  Philosophy (128)  |  Preference (13)  |  Pressure (18)  |  Standard Model (2)  |  Theory (346)  |  Tribute (3)

Pervasive depletion and overuse of water supplies, the high capital cost of new large water projects, rising pumping costs and worsening ecological damage call for a shift in the way water is valued, used and managed.
From a study Postel wrote for Worldwatch Institute, quoted in New York Times (22 Sep 1985), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Capital (9)  |  Cost (15)  |  Dam (2)  |  Damage (8)  |  Depletion (3)  |  Ecology (20)  |  High (12)  |  Large (22)  |  Management (6)  |  Pervasive (2)  |  Project (5)  |  Pump (4)  |  Supply (14)  |  Use (51)  |  Value (63)  |  Water (116)

The burgeoning field of computer science has shifted our view of the physical world from that of a collection of interacting material particles to one of a seething network of information. In this way of looking at nature, the laws of physics are a form of software, or algorithm, while the material world—the hardware—plays the role of a gigantic computer.
'Laying Down the Laws', New Scientist. In Clifford A. Pickover, Archimedes to Hawking: Laws of Science and the Great Minds Behind Them (2008), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Algorithm (3)  |  Collection (24)  |  Computer (51)  |  Computer Science (4)  |  Field (68)  |  Gigantic (6)  |  Information (51)  |  Interaction (10)  |  Law (269)  |  Look (30)  |  Material World (2)  |  Matter (131)  |  Nature (524)  |  Network (5)  |  Particle (45)  |  Physical World (3)  |  Physics (153)  |  Role (17)  |  Software (7)  |  View (48)

The footsteps of Nature are to be trac'd, not only in her ordinary course, but when she seems to be put to her shifts, to make many doublings and turnings, and to use some kind of art in endeavouring to avoid our discovery.
Micrographia (1665, reprint 2008), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Avoid (8)  |  Course (25)  |  Discovery (354)  |  Endeavour (23)  |  Nature (524)  |  Ordinary (18)  |  Trace (10)  |  Turn (21)

The Sun is no lonelier than its neighbors; indeed, it is a very common-place star,—dwarfish, though not minute,—like hundreds, nay thousands, of others. By accident the brighter component of Alpha Centauri (which is double) is almost the Sun's twin in brightness, mass, and size. Could this Earth be transported to its vicinity by some supernatural power, and set revolving about it, at a little less than a hundred million miles' distance, the star would heat and light the world just as the Sun does, and life and civilization might go on with no radical change. The Milky Way would girdle the heavens as before; some of our familiar constellations, such as Orion, would be little changed, though others would be greatly altered by the shifting of the nearer stars. An unfamiliar brilliant star, between Cassiopeia and Perseus would be—the Sun. Looking back at it with our telescopes, we could photograph its spectrum, observe its motion among the stars, and convince ourselves that it was the same old Sun; but what had happened to the rest of our planetary system we would not know.
The Solar System and its Origin (1935), 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (26)  |  Alpha Centauri (2)  |  Alteration (16)  |  Brightness (5)  |  Change (129)  |  Civilization (84)  |  Convince (7)  |  Double (6)  |  Dwarf (3)  |  Earth (238)  |  Heat (48)  |  Life (439)  |  Light (112)  |  Look (30)  |  Mass (23)  |  Mile (10)  |  Million (27)  |  Motion (64)  |  Nearness (3)  |  Neighbor (4)  |  Observation (256)  |  Photograph (12)  |  Planet (77)  |  Radical (9)  |  Revolution (33)  |  Size (18)  |  Solar System (22)  |  Spectrum (17)  |  Star (124)  |  Sun (109)  |  Supernatural (8)  |  Telescope (39)  |  Transportation (6)  |  Twin (4)  |  Unfamiliarity (3)  |  World (206)

To Nature nothing can be added; from Nature nothing can be taken away; the sum of her energies is constant, and the utmost man can do in the pursuit of physical truth, or in the applications of physical knowledge, is to shift the constituents of the never-varying total. The law of conservation rigidly excludes both creation and annihilation. Waves may change to ripples, and ripples to waves; magnitude may be substituted for number, and number for magnitude; asteroids may aggregate to suns, suns may resolve themselves into florae and faunae, and floras and faunas melt in air: the flux of power is eternally the same. It rolls in music through the ages, and all terrestrial energy—the manifestations of life as well as the display of phenomena—are but the modulations of its rhythm.
Conclusion of Heat Considered as a Mode of Motion: Being a Course of Twelve Lectures Delivered at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in the Season of 1862 (1863), 449.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (4)  |  Age (56)  |  Aggregate (4)  |  Air (84)  |  Annihilation (5)  |  Asteroid (5)  |  Change (129)  |  Conservation Of Energy (16)  |  Constant (14)  |  Constituent (8)  |  Creation (124)  |  Display (8)  |  Energy (101)  |  Fauna (5)  |  Flora (2)  |  Flux (4)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Life (439)  |  Magnitude (14)  |  Manifestation (21)  |  Melt (5)  |  Modulation (3)  |  Music (25)  |  Nature (524)  |  Nothing (85)  |  Number (88)  |  Phenomenon (113)  |  Power (98)  |  Resolve (7)  |  Rhythm (4)  |  Ripple (2)  |  Same (15)  |  Substitute (10)  |  Sum (17)  |  Sun (109)  |  Terrestrial (7)  |  Total (13)  |  Truth (440)  |  Wave (32)

We are at that very point in time when a four-hundred-year-old age is rattling in its deathbed and another is struggling to be born. A shifting of culture, science, society and institutions enormously greater and swifter than the world has ever experienced. Ahead, lies the possibility of regeneration of individuality, liberty, community and ethics such as the world has never known, and a harmony with nature, with one another and with the divine intelligence such as the world has always dreamed.
Birth of the Chaordic Age (1999), 310-311.
Science quotes on:  |  Community (26)  |  Culture (42)  |  Ethics (23)  |  Harmony (24)  |  Individuality (3)  |  Institution (14)  |  Liberty (9)  |  Nature (524)  |  Regeneration (2)  |  Science (850)  |  Society (81)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

New Book


The Simpsons and their Mathematical Secrets,
by Simon Singh

Cleverly embedded in many Simpsons plots are subtle references to mathematics, because the show's brilliant comedy writers with advanced degrees in math or science. Singh offers an entirely new insight into the most successful show in television history.