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Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
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Liquor Quotes (3 quotes)

All that Anatomie can doe is only to shew us the gross and sensible parts of the body, or the vapid and dead juices all which, after the most diligent search, will be noe more able to direct a physician how to cure a disease than how to make a man; for to remedy the defects of a part whose organicall constitution and that texture whereby it operates, he cannot possibly know, is alike hard, as to make a part which he knows not how is made. Now it is certaine and beyond controversy that nature performs all her operations on the body by parts so minute and insensible that I thinke noe body will ever hope or pretend, even by the assistance of glasses or any other intervention, to come to a sight of them, and to tell us what organicall texture or what kinde offerment (for whether it be done by one or both of these ways is yet a question and like to be soe always notwithstanding all the endeavours of the most accurate dissections) separate any part of the juices in any of the viscera, or tell us of what liquors the particles of these juices are, or if this could be donne (which it is never like to be) would it at all contribute to the cure of the diseases of those very parts which we so perfectly knew.
'Anatomie' (1668). Quoted in Kenneth Dewhurst (ed.), Dr. Thomas Sydenham (1624-1689): His Life and Original Writings (1966), 85-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (32)  |  Cure (49)  |  Defect (8)  |  Diligence (7)  |  Disease (170)  |  Dissection (14)  |  Endeavour (23)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Physician (172)  |  Remedy (23)  |  Search (40)

The puritanical potentialities of science have never been forecast. If it evolves a body of organized rites, and is established as a religion, hierarchically organized, things more than anything else will be done in the name of 'decency.' The coarse fumes of tobacco and liquors, the consequent tainting of the breath and staining of white fingers and teeth, which is so offensive to many women, will be the first things attended to.
Wyndham Lewis: an Anthology of his Prose (1969), 170.
Science quotes on:  |  Breath (15)  |  Decency (2)  |  Establish (10)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Finger (14)  |  First (42)  |  Forecast (4)  |  Fume (5)  |  Hierarchy (6)  |  Organization (51)  |  Potential (15)  |  Puritan (3)  |  Religion (120)  |  Stain (7)  |  Teeth (7)  |  Tobacco (8)  |  Woman (36)

The wild gas, the fixed air is plainly broke loose: but we ought to suspend our judgments until the first effervescence is a little subsided, till the liquor is cleared, and until we see something deeper than the agitation of the troubled and frothy surface.
[About the “spirit of liberty;” alluding to Priestley's Observations on Air]
Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Agitation (5)  |  Break (18)  |  Carbon Dioxide (14)  |  clearing (2)  |  Fixed Air (2)  |  Gas (30)  |  Judgment (39)  |  Liberty (9)  |  Loose (4)  |  Joseph Priestley (13)  |  Surface (37)  |  Suspension (4)  |  Trouble (22)  |  Wildness (4)


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