Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I was going to record talking... the foil was put on; I then shouted 'Mary had a little lamb',... and the machine reproduced it perfectly.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Intention

Intention Quotes (20 quotes)

Hoc age ['do this'] is the great rule, whether you are serious or merry; whether ... learning science or duty from a folio, or floating on the Thames. Intentions must be gathered from acts.
In James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson (1821), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (22)  |  Duty (26)  |  Float (8)  |  Gather (7)  |  Learn (23)  |  Merry (2)  |  Rule (52)  |  Science (875)  |  Serious (13)

Question: State the relations existing between the pressure, temperature, and density of a given gas. How is it proved that when a gas expands its temperature is diminished?
Answer: Now the answer to the first part of this question is, that the square root of the pressure increases, the square root of the density decreases, and the absolute temperature remains about the same; but as to the last part of the question about a gas expanding when its temperature is diminished, I expect I am intended to say I don't believe a word of it, for a bladder in front of a fire expands, but its temperature is not at all diminished.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 175, Question 1. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (96)  |  Bladder (2)  |  Density (8)  |  Diminution (4)  |  Examination (47)  |  Existence (150)  |  Expansion (18)  |  Expectation (26)  |  Fire (59)  |  Gas (30)  |  Howler (15)  |  Increase (36)  |  Pressure (18)  |  Proof (136)  |  Question (159)  |  Relation (35)  |  Square Root (3)  |  State (43)  |  Temperature (23)

Evolution is a blind giant who rolls a snowball down a hill. The ball is made of flakes—circumstances. They contribute to the mass without knowing it. They adhere without intention, and without foreseeing what is to result. When they see the result they marvel at the monster ball and wonder how the contriving of it came to be originally thought out and planned. Whereas there was no such planning, there was only a law: the ball once started, all the circumstances that happened to lie in its path would help to build it, in spite of themselves.
'The Secret History of Eddypus', in Mark Twain and David Ketterer (ed.), Tales of Wonder (2003), 222-23.
Science quotes on:  |  Adhesion (2)  |  Blindness (5)  |  Building (34)  |  Circumstance (25)  |  Contribution (23)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Flake (2)  |  Giant (15)  |  Hill (14)  |  Law (273)  |  Marvel (16)  |  Mass (23)  |  Path (21)  |  Plan (40)  |  Result (129)  |  Rolling (2)

I would say here something that was heard from an ecclesiastic of the most eminent degree: 'That the intention of the Holy Ghost is to teach us how one goes to heaven, not how heaven goes.
Letter to Cristina di Lorena, Grand Duchess of Tuscany (the mother of his patron Cosmo), 1615. Translation as given in the Galilean Library web page www.galilean-library.org/manuscript.php?postid=43841.
Science quotes on:  |  Heaven (55)  |  Teach (19)

If our intention had been merely to bring back a handful of soil and rocks from the lunar gravel pit and then forget the whole thing, we would certainly be history's biggest fools. But that is not our intention now—it never will be. What we are seeking in tomorrow's [Apollo 11] trip is indeed that key to our future on earth. We are expanding the mind of man. We are extending this God-given brain and these God-given hands to their outermost limits and in so doing all mankind will benefit. All mankind will reap the harvest…. What we will have attained when Neil Armstrong steps down upon the moon is a completely new step in the evolution of man.
Banquet speech on the eve of the Apollo 11 launch, Royal Oaks Country Club, Titusville (15 Jul 1969). In "Of a Fire on the Moon", Life (29 Aug 1969), 67, No. 9, 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Apollo 11 (6)  |  Neil Armstrong (8)  |  Attainment (23)  |  Benefit (21)  |  Brain (106)  |  Bringing (8)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Expansion (18)  |  Fool (32)  |  Forgetting (8)  |  Future (110)  |  Handful (2)  |  Harvest (7)  |  History (156)  |  Human Mind (21)  |  Key (18)  |  Limit (34)  |  Lunar (2)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Merely (13)  |  Reaping (4)  |  Rock (54)  |  Seeking (17)  |  Soil (24)  |  Step (26)  |  Trip (4)

In engineering, that only is great which achieves. It matters not what the intention is, he who in the day of battle is not victorious is not saved by his intention.
In Proverbs from Plymouth Pulpit (1887), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (73)  |  Battle (10)  |  Engineering (60)  |  Greatness (24)  |  Victory (10)

In the mathematics I can report no deficience, except it be that men do not sufficiently understand this excellent use of the pure mathematics, in that they do remedy and cure many defects in the wit and faculties intellectual. For if the wit be too dull, they sharpen it; if too wandering, they fix it; if too inherent in the sense, they abstract it. So that as tennis is a game of no use in itself, but of great use in respect it maketh a quick eye and a body ready to put itself into all postures, so in the mathematics that use which is collateral and intervenient is no less worthy than that which is principal and intended.
The Advancement of Learning (1605), Book 2. Reprinted in The Two Books of Francis Bacon: Of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning, Divine and Human (2009), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (19)  |  Body (88)  |  Collateral (2)  |  Cure (49)  |  Defect (8)  |  Deficiency (4)  |  Dull (12)  |  Excellence (18)  |  Eye (67)  |  Faculty (21)  |  Fix (3)  |  Game (28)  |  Inherent (17)  |  Intellect (99)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Posture (3)  |  Principal (6)  |  Pure Mathematics (6)  |  Remedy (23)  |  Report (15)  |  Sense (104)  |  Sharp (6)  |  Tennis (2)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Use (54)  |  Wander (7)  |  Wit (13)

Nature appears not to have intended that any flower should be fertilized by its own pollen.
Das entdeckte Geheimniss der Natur im Bau und in der Befructung der Blumen (1793), 43. Quoted in Lawrence J. King, 'Christian Konrad Sprengel', in C. C. Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1975), Vol. 12, 588.
Science quotes on:  |  Fertilization (11)  |  Flower (24)  |  Nature (534)  |  Pollen (3)

Nature intended me for the tranquil pursuits of science, by rendering them my supreme delight. But the enormities of the times in which I have lived, have forced me to take a part in resisting them, and to commit myself on the boisterous ocean of political passions.
Letter to Pierre Samuel Du Pont de Nemours (2 Mar 1809). In Thomas Jefferson and John P. Foley (ed.) The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia (1990), 766.
Science quotes on:  |  Commitment (8)  |  Delight (22)  |  Enormity (3)  |  Forcing (2)  |  Life (460)  |  Nature (534)  |  Ocean (56)  |  Passion (24)  |  Politics (52)  |  Pursuit (34)  |  Rendering (4)  |  Resistance (14)  |  Science (875)  |  Supreme (8)  |  Time (170)  |  Tranquility (3)

No other explanation of living forms is allowed than heredity, and any which is founded on another basis must be rejected. The present fashion requires that even the smallest and most indifferent inquiry must be dressed in phylogenetic costume, and whilst in former centuries authors professed to read in every natural detail some intention of the creator mundi, modern scientists have the aspiration to pick out from every occasional observation a fragment of the ancestral history of the living world.
'On the Principles of Animal Morphology', Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (2 Apr 1888), 15, 294. Original as Letter to Mr John Murray, communicated to the Society by Professor Sir William Turner. Page given as in collected volume published 1889.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspiration (8)  |  Basis (25)  |  Detail (33)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Fashion (9)  |  Form (70)  |  Fragment (13)  |  Heredity (43)  |  History (156)  |  Inquiry (14)  |  Life (460)  |  Modern (44)  |  Natural (48)  |  Observation (264)  |  Occasional (2)  |  Pick (6)  |  Read (32)  |  Reject (7)  |  Scientist (237)

Science … has no consideration for ultimate purposes, any more than Nature has, but just as the latter occasionally achieves things of the greatest suitableness without intending to do so, so also true science, as the imitator of nature in ideas, will occasionally and in many ways further the usefulness and welfare of man,—but also without intending to do so.
Human, All Too Human (1878), Vol. 1, 58. Quoted in Willard Huntington Wright, What Nietzsche Taught (1915), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Imitator (2)  |  Nature (534)  |  Science (875)  |  Usefulness (54)  |  Welfare (9)

The longing to behold this pre-established harmony [of phenomena and theoretical principles] is the source of the inexhaustible patience and perseverance with which Planck has devoted himself ... The state of mind which enables a man to do work of this kind is akin to that of the religious worshiper or the lover; the daily effort comes from no deliberate intention or program, but straight from the heart.
Address (1918) for Max Planck's 60th birthday, at Physical Society, Berlin, 'Principles of Research' in Essays in Science (1934), 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Devotion (12)  |  Effort (40)  |  Harmony (27)  |  Heart (46)  |  Inexhaustible (4)  |  Longing (4)  |  Love (64)  |  Patience (16)  |  Perseverance (10)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Max Planck (54)  |  Program (7)  |  Religion (120)  |  Research (360)  |  Theory (353)  |  Work (198)  |  Worship (11)

The qualities of bodies, which admit neither intension nor remission of degrees, and which are found to belong to fill bodies within the reach of our experiments, are to be esteemed the universal qualities of all bodies whatsoever.
From Isaac Newton, Rules of Reasoning in Philosophy, Rule 3, as translated by Andrew Motte in The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1803), Vol. 2, 160.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (5)  |  Belong (10)  |  Body (88)  |  Degree (18)  |  Esteem (3)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Fill (13)  |  Quality (29)  |  Reach (30)  |  Universal (26)

The specific goals we set for ourselves are almost always subsidiary to our long range intentions. A good parent, a good neighbour, a good citizen, is not good because his specific goals are acceptable, but because his successive goals are ordered to a dependable and socially desirable set of values. (1947)
Presidential Address to the first annual Meeting of the American Psychological Asssociation (1947). As cited by Charles Abraham and Paschal Sheeran, 'Implications of Goal Theories for the Theories of Reasoned Action and Planned Behavior' in Christopher J. Armitage and Julie Christian (eds.), Planned Behavior: The Relationship Between Human Thought and Action (2004), 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Citizen (11)  |  Goal (36)  |  Good (81)  |  Neighbour (2)  |  Parent (24)  |  Society (84)  |  Subsidiary (2)  |  Successive (5)  |  Value (63)

This is the patent-age of new inventions
For killing bodies, and for saving souls,
All propagated with the best intentions;
Sir Humphrey Davy's lantern, by which coals
Are safely mined for in the mode he mentions,
Tombuctoo travels, voyages to the Poles,
Are ways to benefit mankind, as true,
Perhaps, as shooting them at Waterloo.
Don Juan (1819, 1858), Canto I, CXXXII, 36. Although aware of scientific inventions, the poet seemed to view them with suspicion. Davy invented his safety lamp in 1803. Sir W.E. Parry made a voyage to the Arctic Regions (4 Apr to 18 Nov 1818).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (60)  |  Benefit (21)  |  Best (42)  |  Body (88)  |  Coal (20)  |  Invention (174)  |  Killing (9)  |  Lantern (3)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Mining (7)  |  New (107)  |  Patent (19)  |  Pole (7)  |  Propagation (7)  |  Safety Lamp (3)  |  Saving (12)  |  Soul (54)  |  Travel (14)

Thus the system of the world only oscillates around a mean state from which it never departs except by a very small quantity. By virtue of its constitution and the law of gravity, it enjoys a stability that can be destroyed only by foreign causes, and we are certain that their action is undetectable from the time of the most ancient observations until our own day. This stability in the system of the world, which assures its duration, is one of the most notable among all phenomena, in that it exhibits in the heavens the same intention to maintain order in the universe that nature has so admirably observed on earth for the sake of preserving individuals and perpetuating species.
'Sur l'Équation Séculaire de la Lune' (1786, published 1788). In Oeuvres complètes de Laplace, 14 Vols. (1843-1912), Vol. 11, 248-9, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (57)  |  Ancient (27)  |  Cause (122)  |  Certainty (59)  |  The Constitution of the United States (7)  |  Destroy (15)  |  Duration (5)  |  Exhibit (3)  |  Foreign (8)  |  Gravity (59)  |  Heaven (55)  |  Individual (59)  |  Law (273)  |  Maintain (10)  |  Mean (7)  |  Nature (534)  |  Observation (264)  |  Order (60)  |  Oscillation (3)  |  Perpetuate (3)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Preservation (14)  |  Species (96)  |  Stability (6)  |  State (43)  |  System (66)  |  Time (170)  |  Undetectable (2)  |  Universe (291)  |  World (231)

We will be misguided in our intentions if we point at one single thing and say that it will prevent war, unless, of course, that thing happens to be the will, the determination, and the resolve of people everywhere that nations will never again clash on the battlefield.
Opening address (7 Nov 1945) of Town Hall’s annual lecture series, as quoted in 'Gen. Groves Warns on Atom ‘Suicide’', New York Times (8 Nov 1945), 4. (Just three months before he spoke, two atom bombs dropped on Japan in Aug 1945 effectively ended WW II.)
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (71)  |  Battlefield (2)  |  Clash (4)  |  Determination (37)  |  Misguiding (2)  |  Nation (47)  |  Pointing (3)  |  Prevention (26)  |  Resolution (10)  |  War (79)  |  Will (22)

What we believe, endorse, agree with, and depend on is representable and, increasingly, represented on the Web. We all have to ensure that the society we build with the Web is the sort we intend.
Weaving The Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web (2004), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (139)  |  Build (23)  |  Creation (129)  |  Ensure (4)  |  Representation (17)  |  Society (84)  |  World Wide Web (2)

[O]ne might ask why, in a galaxy of a few hundred billion stars, the aliens are so intent on coming to Earth at all. It would be as if every vertebrate in North America somehow felt drawn to a particular house in Peoria, Illinois. Are we really that interesting?
Quoted in 'Do Aliens Exist in the Milky Way', PBS web page for WGBH Nova, 'Origins.'
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (16)  |  Billion (24)  |  Come (2)  |  Earth (250)  |  Extraterrestrial Life (16)  |  Galaxy (19)  |  House (19)  |  Interest (82)  |  North America (3)  |  Particular (24)  |  Star (132)  |  Vertebrate (11)

[T]here are some common animal behaviors that seem to favor the development of intelligence, behaviors that might lead to brainy beasts on many worlds. Social interaction is one of them. If you're an animal that hangs out with others, then there's clearly an advantage in being smart enough to work out the intentions of the guy sitting next to you (before he takes your mate or your meal). And if you're clever enough to outwit the other members of your social circle, you'll probably have enhanced opportunity to breed..., thus passing on your superior intelligence. ... Nature—whether on our planet or some alien world—will stumble into increased IQ sooner or later.
Seth Shostak, Alex Barnett, Cosmic Company: the Search for Life in the Universe (2003), 62 & 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (22)  |  Alien (16)  |  Animal (143)  |  Beast (14)  |  Behavior (13)  |  Brain (106)  |  Breeding (5)  |  Clever (4)  |  Common (44)  |  Development (122)  |  Favor (2)  |  Intelligence (76)  |  Interaction (11)  |  IQ (4)  |  Mate (2)  |  Meal (9)  |  Opportunity (20)  |  Smart (3)  |  Society (84)  |  Stumble (3)  |  Superior (14)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton