Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Superfund legislation... may prove to be as far-reaching and important as any accomplishment of my administration. The reduction of the threat to America's health and safety from thousands of toxic-waste sites will continue to be an urgent…issue …”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index H > Category: Help

Help Quotes (18 quotes)

A life that stood out as a gospel of self-forgetting service.
He could have added fortune to fame but caring for neither he found happiness and honor in being helpful to the world.
The centre of his world was the south where he was born in slavery some 79 years ago and where he did his work as a creative scientist.
Epitaph on tombstone at Tuskegee University Campus Cemetery, Alabama.
Science quotes on:  |  Birth (47)  |  Care (37)  |  Creativity (45)  |  Epitaph (18)  |  Fame (21)  |  Fortune (15)  |  Gospel (3)  |  Happiness (58)  |  Neither (4)  |  Research (360)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Service (27)  |  Slavery (5)  |  South (3)

Civilization no longer needs to open up wilderness; it needs wilderness to help open up the still largely unexplored human mind.
In The Dark Range: a Naturalist's Night Notebook (1978), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (90)  |  Exploration (48)  |  Mind (272)  |  Opening (8)  |  Unexplored (5)  |  Wilderness (11)

Curiosity has its own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality.
Recollection of a statement to William Miller, an editor, as quoted in Life magazine (2 May 1955). Cited in Walter Isaacson, Einstein: His Life and Universe (2008), 548.
Science quotes on:  |  Awe (9)  |  Curiosity (52)  |  Eternity (22)  |  Existing (3)  |  Life (460)  |  Marvelous (3)  |  Mystery (74)  |  Reality (67)  |  Reason (173)  |  Structure (104)

I hold every man a debtor to his profession; from the which as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavour themselves, by way of amends, to be a help and ornament thereunto. This is performed, in some degree, by the honest and liberal practice of a profession; where men shall carry a respect not to descend into any course that is corrupt and unworthy thereof, and preserve themselves free from the abuses wherewith the same profession is noted to be infected: but much more is this performed, if a man be able to visit and strengthen the roots and foundation of the science itself; thereby not only gracing it in reputation and dignity, but also amplifying it in profession and substance.
Opening sentences of Preface, Maxims of Law (1596), in The Works of Francis Bacon: Law tracts. Maxims of the Law (1803), Vol. 4, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (3)  |  Amplification (3)  |  Corruption (5)  |  Countenance (2)  |  Course (25)  |  Descent (8)  |  Dignity (7)  |  Endeavour (23)  |  Foundation (31)  |  Freedom (41)  |  Grace (7)  |  Honesty (11)  |  Infection (15)  |  Liberal (4)  |  Ornament (9)  |  Performance (16)  |  Practice (26)  |  Preservation (14)  |  Profession (26)  |  Profit (14)  |  Reputation (7)  |  Respect (24)  |  Root (19)  |  Science (875)  |  Substance (39)  |  Unworthy (4)  |  Visit (4)

I prefer the spagyric chemical physicians, for they do not consort with loafers or go about gorgeous in satins, silks and velvets, gold rings on their fingers, silver daggers hanging at their sides and white gloves on their hands, but they tend their work at the fire patiently day and night. They do not go promenading, but seek their recreation in the laboratory, wear plain learthern dress and aprons of hide upon which to wipe their hands, thrust their fingers amongst the coals, into dirt and rubbish and not into golden rings. They are sooty and dirty like the smiths and charcoal burners, and hence make little show, make not many words and gossip with their patients, do not highly praise their own remedies, for they well know that the work must praise the master, not the master praise his work. They well know that words and chatter do not help the sick nor cure them... Therefore they let such things alone and busy themselves with working with their fires and learning the steps of alchemy. These are distillation, solution, putrefaction, extraction, calcination, reverberation, sublimination, fixation, separation, reduction, coagulation, tinction, etc.
Quoted in R. Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 150. [Spagyric is a form of herbalism based on alchemic procedures of preparation.]
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (17)  |  Busy (6)  |  Calcination (3)  |  Charcoal (5)  |  Chatter (2)  |  Chemical (38)  |  Coagulation (3)  |  Coal (20)  |  Cure (49)  |  Dagger (2)  |  Dirt (5)  |  Distillation (7)  |  Extraction (5)  |  Finger (14)  |  Fire (59)  |  Glove (2)  |  Gold (19)  |  Gossip (3)  |  Hand (34)  |  Hide (13)  |  Laboratory (75)  |  Leather (2)  |  Loafer (2)  |  Master (19)  |  Patience (16)  |  Patient (54)  |  Physician (172)  |  Praise (9)  |  Putrefaction (3)  |  Recreation (6)  |  Reduction (22)  |  Remedy (23)  |  Ring (6)  |  Rubbish (5)  |  Satin (2)  |  Separation (23)  |  Show (13)  |  Sick (6)  |  Silk (4)  |  Silver (11)  |  Solution (109)  |  Soot (4)  |  Step (26)  |  Velvet (2)  |  White (12)  |  Wipe (3)  |  Word (97)  |  Work (198)

I tell [medical students] that they are the luckiest persons on earth to be in medical school, and to forget all this worry about H.M.O.'s and keep your eye on helping the patient. It's the best time ever to be a doctor because you can heal and treat conditions that were untreatable even a couple of years ago.
From Cornelia Dean, 'A Conversation with Joseph E. Murray', New York Times (25 Sep 2001), F5.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (22)  |  Best (42)  |  Condition (68)  |  Doctor (54)  |  Forget (10)  |  Heal (2)  |  Luck (22)  |  Patient (54)  |  Student (54)  |  Time (170)  |  Treat (4)  |  Worry (11)

I'm not a wizard or a Frankenstein tampering with Nature. We are not creating life. We have merely done what many people try to do in all kinds of medicine—to help nature. We found nature could not put an egg and sperm together, so we did it. We do not see anything immoral in doing that in the interests of the mother. I cannot see anything immoral in trying to help the patient’s problem.
As quoted by thr Associated Press after the birth of Louise Brown, the first baby born by in vitro fertilization. Reprinted in, for example,'First test-tube baby born in England', Toledo Blade (27 Jul 1978), 1. As reported, the first sentence was given in its own quote marks, followed by “Dr. Steptoe said,” so the quote may not have been delivered as a single statement.
Science quotes on:  |  Create (15)  |  Egg (27)  |  Fertilization (11)  |  Frankenstein (2)  |  Immorality (3)  |  In Vitro (2)  |  Interest (82)  |  Life (460)  |  Medicine (185)  |  Mother (25)  |  Nature (534)  |  Patient (54)  |  Sperm (4)  |  Tamper (3)  |  Try (34)  |  Wizard (2)

If I had my life to live over again I would not devote it to develop new industrial processes: I would try to add my humble efforts to use Science to the betterment of the human race.
I despair of the helter-skelter methods of our vaulted homo sapiens, misguided by his ignorance and his politicians. If we continue our ways, there is every possibility that the human race may follow the road of former living races of animals whose fossils proclaim that they were not fit to continue. Religion, laws and morals is not enough. We need more. Science can help us.
Letter to a friend (14 Jan 1934). In Savage Grace (1985, 2007), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Betterment (3)  |  Despair (13)  |  Devotion (12)  |  Effort (40)  |  Extinction (38)  |  Fossil (73)  |  Homo Sapiens (11)  |  Human Race (29)  |  Humility (12)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Industry (49)  |  Law (273)  |  Life (460)  |  Method (73)  |  Misguiding (2)  |  Need (57)  |  Politician (12)  |  Process (97)  |  Religion (120)  |  Science (875)

It is not always the most brilliant speculations nor the choice of the most exotic materials that is most profitable. I prefer Monsieur de Reaumur busy exterminating moths by means of an oily fleece; or increasing fowl production by making them hatch without the help of their mothers, than Monsieur Bemouilli absorbed in algebra, or Monsieur Leibniz calculating the various advantages and disadvantages of the possible worlds.
Spectacle, 1, 475. Quoted in Camille Limoges, 'Noel-Antoine Pluche', in C. C. Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974 ), Vol. 11, 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (22)  |  Brilliance (4)  |  Choice (40)  |  Disadvantage (5)  |  Extermination (6)  |  Fowl (2)  |  Increase (36)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (24)  |  Material (60)  |  Moth (3)  |  Mother (25)  |  Oil (19)  |  Possibility (70)  |  Production (72)  |  Profit (14)  |  Speculation (44)  |  World (231)

No doubt, a scientist isn't necessarily penalized for being a complex, versatile, eccentric individual with lots of extra-scientific interests. But it certainly doesn't help him a bit.
'The Historical Background to the Anti-Science Movement'. In Gordon Ethelbert Ward Wolstenholme, Civilization & Science in Conflict or Collaboration? (1972), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Complex (20)  |  Eccentric (2)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Versatile (2)

Perhaps it is better in this present world of ours that a revolutionary idea or invention instead of being helped and patted be hampered and ill-treated in its adolescence—by want of means, by selfish interest, pedantry, stupidity and ignorance; that it be attacked and stifled; that it pass through bitter trials and tribulations, through the heartless strife of commercial existence. ... So all that was great in the past was ridiculed, condemned, combatted, suppressed—only to emerge all the more powerfully, all the more triumphantly from the struggle.
'The Transmission of Electrical Energy Without Wires As a Means for Furthering Peace', Electrical World and Engineer (7 Jan 1905), 24. Reproduced in John T. Ratzlaff, editor, Tesla Said (1984), 86. Also reprinted in Nikola Tesla, Miscellaneous Writings (2007), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (13)  |  Bitter (6)  |  Commercial (10)  |  Condemnation (8)  |  Emerge (4)  |  Existence (150)  |  Idea (226)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Invention (174)  |  Pedantry (2)  |  Revolutionary (6)  |  Ridicule (9)  |  Selfishness (3)  |  Strife (5)  |  Struggle (18)  |  Stupidity (14)  |  Trial (14)  |  Triumph (21)

Richard Feynman was fond of giving the following advice on how to be a genius. You have to keep a dozen of your favorite problems constantly present in your mind, although by and large they will lay in a dormant state. Every time you hear or read a new trick or a new result, test it against each of your twelve problems to see whether it helps. Every once in a while there will be a hit, and people will say, “How did he do it? He must be a genius!”
In 'Ten Lessons I Wish I Had Been Taught', Indiscrete Thoughts (2008), 202.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (22)  |  Constantly (4)  |  Dormant (2)  |  Dozen (3)  |  Favorite (8)  |  Richard P. Feynman (37)  |  Fond (3)  |  Genius (92)  |  Hear (4)  |  Hit (3)  |  Keep (9)  |  Mind (272)  |  New (107)  |  People (72)  |  Present (36)  |  Problem (180)  |  Read (32)  |  Result (129)  |  State (43)  |  Test (46)  |  Trick (11)  |  Twelve (2)

Science can have a purifying effect on religion, freeing it from beliefs of a pre-scientific age and helping us to a truer conception of God. At the same time, I am far from believing that science will ever give us the answers to all our questions.
Essay 'Science Will Never Give Us the Answers to All Our Questions', collected in Henry Margenau, and Roy Abraham Varghese (eds.), Cosmos, Bios, Theos (1992), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (60)  |  Answer (96)  |  Belief (139)  |  Conception (29)  |  Effect (72)  |  Freeing (2)  |  God (234)  |  Pre-Scientific (2)  |  Purify (2)  |  Question (159)  |  Religion (120)  |  Science (875)

The next decade will perhaps raise us a step above despair to a cleaner, clearer wisdom and biology cannot fail to help in this. As we become increasingly aware of the ethical problems raised by science and technology, the frontiers between the biological and social sciences are clearly of critical importance—in population density and problems of hunger, psychological stress, pollution of the air and water and exhaustion of irreplaceable resources.
As quoted in 'H. Bentley Glass', New York Times (12 Jan 1970), 96.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Awareness (14)  |  Biology (83)  |  Clearer (3)  |  Decade (8)  |  Despair (13)  |  Environment (75)  |  Ethics (23)  |  Exhaustion (11)  |  Frontier (5)  |  Hunger (7)  |  Importance (106)  |  Irreplaceable (2)  |  Pollution (16)  |  Population (41)  |  Problem (180)  |  Psychology (69)  |  Resource (15)  |  Science (875)  |  Social Science (17)  |  Stress (4)  |  Technology (98)  |  Water (122)  |  Wisdom (91)

The United States pledges before you—and therefore before the world—its determination to help solve the fearful atomic dilemma—to devote its entire heart and mind to find the way by which the miraculous inventiveness of man shall not be dedicated to his death, but consecrated to his life.
From address to the General Assembly of the United Nations (8 Dec 1953).
Science quotes on:  |  Death (183)  |  Dedicated (4)  |  Determination (37)  |  Devote (5)  |  Entire (7)  |  Fearful (2)  |  Find (50)  |  Heart (46)  |  Inventiveness (2)  |  Life (460)  |  Man (258)  |  Mind (272)  |  Miraculous (3)  |  Solve (5)  |  United States (12)  |  World (231)

Theory helps us to bear our ignorance of fact.
In The Sense of Beauty: Being the Outlines of Aesthetic Theory (1896), 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (6)  |  Fact (325)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Theory (353)

We set sail on this new sea because there is new knowledge to be gained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. For space science, like nuclear science and technology, has no conscience of its own. Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of preeminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war.
Address at Rice University in Houston (12 Sep 1962). On web site of John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.
Science quotes on:  |  Conscience (16)  |  Decision (30)  |  Dependence (21)  |  Force (75)  |  Gain (23)  |  Good (81)  |  Ill (7)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Man (258)  |  New (107)  |  Nuclear Science (2)  |  Ocean (56)  |  Peace (23)  |  People (72)  |  Position (18)  |  Progress (200)  |  Right (49)  |  Sailing (3)  |  Sea (57)  |  Space (68)  |  Technology (98)  |  Use (54)  |  War (79)  |  Winning (2)

We will be able to depart this life with the quiet peace-giving notion, that we were permitted to contribute to the happiness of many who will live after us. In our long lives we endeavored to unfold the collective consciousness. In our lives we have known hell and heaven; the final balance, however, is that we helped pave the way to dynamic harmony in this earthly house. That, I believe, is the meaning of this live.
Letter to old anonymous friend (Jul 1981), quoted in Willem J. M. van der Linden, 'In Memoriam: R. W. van Bemmelen', Netherlands Journal of Geosciences, Geologie en Mijnbouw (1984), 63, No. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (24)  |  Belief (139)  |  Collective (4)  |  Consciousness (36)  |  Contribution (23)  |  Earthly (2)  |  Happiness (58)  |  Harmony (27)  |  Heaven (55)  |  Hell (13)  |  House (19)  |  Life (460)  |  Meaning (52)  |  Pave (2)  |  Peace (23)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton