Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Effort

Effort Quotes (40 quotes)

Decus et pretium recte petit experiens vir.
The man who makes the attempt justly aims at honour and reward.
Horace
Epistles bk. 1, no. 17, 1. 42. In Satires, Epistles and Ars Poetiea, trans. H. Rushton Fairclough (1926), 364-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Honour (20)  |  Reward (21)

Energy is the inherent effort of every multiplicity to become unity.
Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres (1904, 1913), 332.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (11)  |  Energy (103)  |  Inherent (17)  |  Unity (16)

Genius is an immense capacity for taking trouble.
Louis Klopsch, Many Thoughts of Many Minds (1896), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Capacity (15)  |  Genius (92)

Genius unexerted is no more genius than a bushel of acorns is a forest of oaks.
Louis Klopsch, Many Thoughts of Many Minds (1896), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Acorn (3)  |  Forest (54)  |  Genius (92)  |  Oak (7)

Heroes and scholars represent the opposite extremes... The scholar struggles for the benefit of all humanity, sometimes to reduce physical effort, sometimes to reduce pain, and sometimes to postpone death, or at least render it more bearable. In contrast, the patriot sacrifices a rather substantial part of humanity for the sake of his own prestige. His statue is always erected on a pedestal of ruins and corpses... In contrast, all humanity crowns a scholar, love forms the pedestal of his statues, and his triumphs defy the desecration of time and the judgment of history.
In Santiago Ramσn y Cajal, Neely Swanson (trans.) and Larry W. Swanson (trans.), Advice for a Young Investigator (2004), 41-42.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (21)  |  Contrast (3)  |  Corpse (4)  |  Crown (11)  |  Death (183)  |  Defiance (2)  |  Hero (10)  |  History (156)  |  Humanity (46)  |  Judgment (39)  |  Love (64)  |  Opposite (21)  |  Pain (49)  |  Part (55)  |  Patriot (3)  |  Prestige (6)  |  Reduction (22)  |  Render (9)  |  Ruin (12)  |  Sacrifice (12)  |  Sake (8)  |  Scholar (19)  |  Statue (5)  |  Struggle (18)  |  Substantial (2)  |  Time (170)  |  Triumph (21)

I never could do anything with figures, never had any talent for mathematics, never accomplished anything in my efforts at that rugged study, and to-day the only mathematics I know is multiplication, and the minute I get away up in that, as soon as I reach nine times seven— [He lapsed into deep thought, trying to figure nine times seven. Mr. McKelway whispered the answer to him.] I've got it now. It's eighty-four. Well, I can get that far all right with a little hesitation. After that I am uncertain, and I can't manage a statistic.
Speech at the New York Association for Promoting the Interests of the Blind (29 Mar 1906). In Mark Twain and William Dean Howells (ed.), Mark Twain's Speeches? (1910), 323.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (25)  |  Figure (13)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Multiplication (11)  |  Number (90)  |  Rugged (3)  |  Statistics (82)  |  Study (157)  |  Talent (19)

If I had my life to live over again I would not devote it to develop new industrial processes: I would try to add my humble efforts to use Science to the betterment of the human race.
I despair of the helter-skelter methods of our vaulted homo sapiens, misguided by his ignorance and his politicians. If we continue our ways, there is every possibility that the human race may follow the road of former living races of animals whose fossils proclaim that they were not fit to continue. Religion, laws and morals is not enough. We need more. Science can help us.
Letter to a friend (14 Jan 1934). In Savage Grace (1985, 2007), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Betterment (3)  |  Despair (13)  |  Devotion (12)  |  Extinction (38)  |  Fossil (73)  |  Help (18)  |  Homo Sapiens (11)  |  Human Race (29)  |  Humility (12)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Industry (49)  |  Law (273)  |  Life (460)  |  Method (73)  |  Misguiding (2)  |  Need (57)  |  Politician (12)  |  Process (97)  |  Religion (120)  |  Science (875)

If you have great talents, industry will improve them; if moderate abilities, industry will supply their deficiencies. Nothing is denied to well-directed labour; nothing is ever to be attained without it.
From 'A Discourse Delivered to the Students of the Royal Academy, on the Distribution of Prizes' (11 Dec 1769), in Seven Discourses Delivered in the Royal Academy (1778), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (37)  |  Deficiency (4)  |  Deny (7)  |  Labour (27)  |  Moderate (2)  |  Talent (19)

Is it absurd to imagine that our social behavior, from amoeba to man, is also planned and dictated, from stored Information, by the cells? And that the time has come for men to be entrusted with the task, through heroic efforts, of bringing life to other worlds?
From Nobel Prize Lecture (Dec 1974), 'The Coming Age of the Cell'. Collected in Jan Lindsten (ed.) Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1971-1980 (1992).
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (9)  |  Amoeba (13)  |  Behavior (13)  |  Bringing (8)  |  Cell (90)  |  Dictate (3)  |  Hero (10)  |  Imagination (130)  |  Information (56)  |  Life (460)  |  Plan (40)  |  Social (16)  |  Store (6)  |  Task (32)  |  World (231)

It is easy to make out three areas where scientists will be concentrating their efforts in the coming decades. One is in physics, where leading theorists are striving, with the help of experimentalists, to devise a single mathematical theory that embraces all the basic phenomena of matter and energy. The other two are in biology. Biologists—and the rest of us too—would like to know how the brain works and how a single cell, the fertilized egg cell, develops into an entire organism
Article 'The View From Mars', in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences: Research Facilities of the Future (1994), 735, 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (18)  |  Biologist (16)  |  Brain (106)  |  Cell (90)  |  Concentrate (3)  |  Decade (8)  |  Develop (11)  |  Devise (4)  |  Egg (27)  |  Embrace (13)  |  Energy (103)  |  Entire (7)  |  Experimentalist (7)  |  Know (25)  |  Mathematical (9)  |  Matter (135)  |  Organism (70)  |  Phenomena (4)  |  Physics (156)  |  Single (26)  |  Strive (7)  |  Theorist (7)  |  Theory (353)

Magic and all that is ascribed to it is a deep presentiment of the powers of science. The shoes of swiftness, the sword of sharpness, the power of subduing the elements, of using the secret virtues of minerals, of understanding the voices of birds, are the obscure efforts of the mind in a right direction.
From 'History', collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1903), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Bird (57)  |  Deep (17)  |  Direction (27)  |  Element (68)  |  Magic (22)  |  Mind (272)  |  Mineral (24)  |  Obscure (6)  |  Power (103)  |  Right (49)  |  Science (875)  |  Secret (44)  |  Sharpness (2)  |  Shoe (5)  |  Swiftness (2)  |  Sword (7)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Using (3)  |  Virtue (27)  |  Voice (16)

Man has risen, not fallen. He can choose to develop his capacities as the highest animal and to try to rise still farther, or he can choose otherwise. The choice is his responsibility, and his alone. There is no automatism that will carry him upward without choice or effort and there is no trend solely in the right direction. Evolution has no purpose; man must supply this for himself. The means to gaining right ends involve both organic evolution and human evolution, but human choice as to what are the right ends must be based on human evolution.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 310.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (143)  |  Basis (25)  |  Capacity (15)  |  Choice (40)  |  Development (122)  |  Direction (27)  |  End (51)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Fall (30)  |  Highest (5)  |  Human (168)  |  Man (258)  |  Organic (19)  |  Purpose (66)  |  Responsibility (24)  |  Right (49)  |  Rise (14)  |  Supply (15)  |  Trend (8)

Mr. [Granville T.] Woods says that he has been frequently refused work because of the previous condition of his race, but he has had great determination and will and never despaired because of disappointments. He always carried his point by persistent efforts. He says the day is past when colored boys will be refused work only because of race prejudice. There are other causes. First, the boy has not the nerve to apply for work after being refused at two or three places. Second, the boy should have some knowledge of mechanics. The latter could be gained at technical schools, which should be founded for the purpose. And these schools must sooner or later be established, and thereby, we should be enabled to put into the hands of our boys and girls the actual means of livelihood.
From William J. Simmons, Men of Mark: Eminent, Progressive and Rising (1887), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (72)  |  Cause (122)  |  Despair (13)  |  Determination (37)  |  Disappointment (4)  |  Establishment (19)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Livelihood (3)  |  Mechanics (27)  |  Nerve (53)  |  Persistence (10)  |  Prejudice (31)  |  Purpose (66)  |  Race (36)  |  Refusal (11)  |  Work (198)

My internal and external life depend so much on the work of others that I must make an extreme effort to give as much as I receive.
Quoted, without citation, in Floyd Merrell, Unthinking Thinking: Jorge Luis Borges, Mathematics, and the New Physics, 241. Webmaster has not found any other source for this quote, and cautions doubt about its authenticity. If you know a primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Dependence (21)  |  External (18)  |  Extreme (17)  |  Giving (5)  |  Internal (6)  |  Life (460)  |  Other (17)  |  Receiving (2)  |  Work (198)

Nature has but one plan of operation, invariably the same in the smallest things as well as in the largest, and so often do we see the smallest masses selected for use in Nature, that even enormous ones are built up solely by fitting these together. Indeed, all Nature's efforts are devoted to uniting the smallest parts of our bodies in such a way that all things whatsoever, however diverse they may be, which coalesce in the structure of living things construct the parts by means of a sort of compendium.
'On the Developmental Process', in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology (1966), Vol. 2, 843.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (88)  |  Building (34)  |  Construction (36)  |  Devotion (12)  |  Diversity (32)  |  Enormous (16)  |  Invariability (3)  |  Large (22)  |  Living Thing (2)  |  Nature (534)  |  Operation (53)  |  Part (55)  |  Plan (40)  |  Sameness (2)  |  Selection (20)  |  Small (35)  |  Structure (104)  |  Uniting (2)  |  Use (54)

Of all the frictional resistances, the one that most retards human movement is ignorance, what Buddha called 'the greatest evil in the world.' The friction which results from ignorance ... can be reduced only by the spread of knowledge and the unification of the heterogeneous elements of humanity. No effort could be better spent.
'The Problem of Increasing Human Energy', The Century (Jun 1900), 211. Collected in The Century (1900), Vol. 60, 211
Science quotes on:  |  Buddha_Gautama (2)  |  Evil (31)  |  Human (168)  |  Humanity (46)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Movement (31)  |  Reduction (22)  |  Resistance (14)  |  Retardation (4)  |  Spread (7)  |  Unification (5)

Our immediate interests are after all of but small moment. It is what we do for the future, what we add to the sum of man's knowledge, that counts most. As someone has said, 'The individual withers and the world is more and more.' Man dies at 70, 80, or 90, or at some earlier age, but through his power of physical reproduction, and with the means that he has to transmit the results of effort to those who come after him, he may be said to be immortal.
'Willis Rodney Whitney', National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs (1960), 360.
Science quotes on:  |  Death (183)  |  Future (110)  |  Immortality (2)  |  Interest (82)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Means (25)  |  Reproduction (34)  |  Result (129)  |  Successor (3)  |  Transmission (18)

Proposition VIII. When two Undulations, from different Origins, coincide either perfectly or very nearly in Direction, their joint effect is a Combination of the Motions belonging to each.
'On the Theory of Light and Colours' (read in 1801), Philosophical Transactions (1802), 92, 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Combination (37)  |  Conincidence (4)  |  Difference (135)  |  Direction (27)  |  Joint (5)  |  Motion (64)  |  Origin (36)  |  Proposition (28)  |  Undulation (3)

Science is a field which grows continuously with ever expanding frontiers. Further, it is truly international in scope. … Science is a collaborative effort. The combined results of several people working together is often much more effective than could be that of an individual scientist working alone.
From his second Nobel Prize Banquet speech (10 Dec 1972). In Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1972 (1973).
Science quotes on:  |  Collaboration (9)  |  Combination (37)  |  Effectiveness (9)  |  Frontier (5)  |  Individual (59)  |  International (6)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Scope (6)  |  Work (198)

Science quickens and cultivates directly the faculty of observation, which in very many persons lies almost dormant through life, the power of accurate and rapid generalizations, and the mental habit of method and arrangement; it accustoms young persons to trace the sequence of cause and effect; it familiarizes then with a kind of reasoning which interests them, and which they can promptly comprehend; and it is perhaps the best corrective for that indolence which is the vice of half-awakened minds, and which shrinks from any exertion that is not, like an effort of memory, merely mechanical.
Anonymous
Report of the Royal Commission on Education (1861), Parliamentary Papers (1864), Vol 20, 32-33, as cited in Paul White, Thomas Huxley: Making the "Man of Science" (2003), 77, footnote. Also quoted in John Lubbock, The Pleasures of Life (1887, 2007), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (34)  |  Arrangement (25)  |  Awakening (4)  |  Cause And Effect (4)  |  Comprehension (30)  |  Cultivation (7)  |  Exertion (6)  |  Faculty (21)  |  Generalization (16)  |  Habit (42)  |  Indolence (5)  |  Interest (82)  |  Life (460)  |  Mechanical (11)  |  Memory (42)  |  Method (73)  |  Mind (272)  |  Observation (264)  |  Power (103)  |  Promptness (2)  |  Quickening (2)  |  Rapidity (14)  |  Reason (173)  |  Science (875)  |  Sequence (15)  |  Shrink (3)  |  Trace (10)  |  Vice (4)

Scientists and particularly the professional students of evolution are often accused of a bias toward mechanism or materialism, even though believers in vitalism and in finalism are not lacking among them. Such bias as may exist is inherent in the method of science. The most successful scientific investigation has generally involved treating phenomena as if they were purely materialistic, rejecting any metaphysical hypothesis as long as a physical hypothesis seems possible. The method works. The restriction is necessary because science is confined to physical means of investigation and so it would stultify its own efforts to postulate that its subject is not physical and so not susceptible to its methods.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Accusation (4)  |  Belief (139)  |  Bias (8)  |  Confinement (3)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Hypothesis (150)  |  Inherent (17)  |  Investigation (83)  |  Lacking (2)  |  Materialism (4)  |  Means (25)  |  Mechanism (25)  |  Metaphysics (24)  |  Method (73)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Physical (28)  |  Postulate (19)  |  Professional (10)  |  Rejection (16)  |  Restriction (3)  |  Scientific Method (101)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Student (54)  |  Stultification (2)  |  Subject (51)  |  Success (114)  |  Treatment (61)  |  Vitalism (4)

Since the seventeenth century, physical intuition has served as a vital source for mathematical porblems and methods. Recent trends and fashions have, however, weakened the connection between mathematics and physics; mathematicians, turning away from their roots of mathematics in intuition, have concentrated on refinement and emphasized the postulated side of mathematics, and at other times have overlooked the unity of their science with physics and other fields. In many cases, physicists have ceased to appreciate the attitudes of mathematicians. This rift is unquestionably a serious threat to science as a whole; the broad stream of scientific development may split into smaller and smaller rivulets and dry out. It seems therefore important to direct our efforts towards reuniting divergent trends by classifying the common features and interconnections of many distinct and diverse scientific facts.
In R. Courant and David Hilbert, Methods of Mathematical Physics (1937, 1989), Preface, v.
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (2)  |  Appreciation (12)  |  Attitude (16)  |  Classification (56)  |  Common (44)  |  Concentration (6)  |  Connection (39)  |  Directing (3)  |  Distinct (12)  |  Divergence (3)  |  Diverse (3)  |  Emphasis (9)  |  Fact (325)  |  Fashion (9)  |  Feature (14)  |  Importance (106)  |  Interconnection (4)  |  Intuition (26)  |  Mathematician (110)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Method (73)  |  Overlooking (3)  |  Physicist (74)  |  Physics (156)  |  Postulate (19)  |  Problem (180)  |  Recent (14)  |  Refinement (6)  |  Root (19)  |  Science (875)  |  Serious (13)  |  Source (33)  |  Threat (9)  |  Trend (8)  |  Turning (5)  |  Unity (16)  |  Vital (10)  |  Whole (46)

Some persons have contended that mathematics ought to be taught by making the illustrations obvious to the senses. Nothing can be more absurd or injurious: it ought to be our never-ceasing effort to make people think, not feel.
Seven Lectures on Shakespeare and Milton (1856) 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (8)  |  Contend (2)  |  Feel (12)  |  Illustration (17)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Obvious (24)  |  Person (38)  |  Sense (104)  |  Teach (19)  |  Thinking (166)

Stem cells are probably going to be extremely useful. But it isn't a given, and even if it were, I don't think the end justifies the means. I am not against stem cells, I think it's great. Blanket objection is not very reasonable to me—any effort to control scientific advances is doomed to fail. You cannot stop the human mind from working.
From Cornelia Dean, 'A Conversation with Joseph E. Murray', New York Times (25 Sep 2001), F5.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (52)  |  Blanket (3)  |  Control (41)  |  Doom (2)  |  Failure (58)  |  Human Mind (21)  |  Justification (20)  |  Means (25)  |  Objection (9)  |  Scientific (55)  |  Stem Cell (8)  |  Stop (25)  |  Usefulness (54)  |  Working (11)

The advancement of science is slow; it is effected only by virtue of hard work and perseverance. And when a result is attained, should we not in recognition connect it with the efforts of those who have preceded us, who have struggled and suffered in advance? Is it not truly a duty to recall the difficulties which they vanquished, the thoughts which guided them; and how men of different nations, ideas, positions, and characters, moved solely by the love of science, have bequeathed to us the unsolved problem? Should not the last comer recall the researches of his predecessors while adding in his turn his contribution of intelligence and of labor? Here is an intellectual collaboration consecrated entirely to the search for truth, and which continues from century to century.
[Respecting how the work of prior researchers had enabled his isolation of fluorine.]
Proceedings of the Royal Institution (1897). In Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution to July 1897 (1898), 262.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (26)  |  Attainment (23)  |  Century (38)  |  Character (39)  |  Collaboration (9)  |  Consecration (2)  |  Continuation (13)  |  Contribution (23)  |  Difficulty (76)  |  Duty (26)  |  Guide (17)  |  Idea (226)  |  Intellect (99)  |  Intelligence (76)  |  Labour (27)  |  Love (64)  |  Nation (47)  |  Perseverance (10)  |  Position (18)  |  Predecessor (13)  |  Recognition (38)  |  Recollection (3)  |  Research (360)  |  Result (129)  |  Search (40)  |  Struggle (18)  |  Thought (170)  |  Truth (450)  |  Virtue (27)  |  Work (198)

The Commissioner of Patents may be likened to a wine merchant. He has in his office the wine of human progress of every kind and quality—wine, one may say, produced from the fermentation of the facts of the world through the yeast of human effort. Sometimes the yeast is “wild” and sometimes the “must” is poor, and while it all lies there shining with its due measure of the sparkle of divine effort, it is but occasionally that one finds a wine whose bouquet is the result of a pure culture on the true fruit of knowledge. But it is this true, pure wine of discovery that is alone of lasting significance.
In Some Chemical Problems of Today (1911), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Bouquet (2)  |  Culture (44)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Fact (325)  |  Fermentation (10)  |  Invention (174)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Lasting (3)  |  Patent (19)  |  Progress (200)  |  Significance (30)  |  True (29)  |  Wine (11)  |  Yeast (4)

The effort to eliminate synthetic pesticides because of unsubstantiated fears about residues in food will make fruits and vegetables more expensive, decrease consumption, and thus increase cancer rates. The levels of synthetic pesticide residues are trivial in comparison to natural chemicals, and thus their potential for cancer causation is extremely low. [Ames believes that “to eat your veggies” is the best way to prevent cancer.]
Paper to the American Chemical Society, 'Pollution, Pesticides and Cancer Misconceptions.' As cited by Art Drysdale, 'Latest Insider News: Natural vs. Synthetic Chemical Pesticides' (14 Feb 1999), on the mitosyfraudes.org website. Bruce Ames has written a similar sentiment in various other publications.
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (25)  |  Causation (5)  |  Chemical (38)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Consumption (6)  |  Decrease (6)  |  Elimination (14)  |  Expense (5)  |  Fear (53)  |  Food (77)  |  Fruit (31)  |  Increase (36)  |  Level (16)  |  Natural (48)  |  Pesticide (4)  |  Potential (15)  |  Rate (11)  |  Residue (4)  |  Synthetic (5)  |  Trivial (14)  |  Vegetable (12)

The effort to understand the universe is one of the very few things that lifts human life above the level of farce, and gives it some of the grace of tragedy.
In The First Three Minutes (1977), 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Farce (3)  |  Grace (7)  |  Human (168)  |  Life (460)  |  Lift (6)  |  Tragedy (9)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Universe (291)

The elegance of a mathematical theorem is directly proportional to the number of independent ideas one can see in the theorem and inversely proportional to the effort it takes to see them.
In Mathematical Discovery: On Understanding, Learning, and Teaching Problem Solving (1981). As cited, with no more details, in Yi Ma, An Invitation to 3-D Vision (2004), 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Elegance (13)  |  Idea (226)  |  Independence (19)  |  Inversely Proportional (2)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Proportion (24)  |  Seeing (29)  |  Taking (8)  |  Theorem (34)

The great testimony of history shows how often in fact the development of science has emerged in response to technological and even economic needs, and how in the economy of social effort, science, even of the most abstract and recondite kind, pays for itself again and again in providing the basis for radically new technological developments. In fact, most people—when they think of science as a good thing, when they think of it as worthy of encouragement, when they are willing to see their governments spend substance upon it, when they greatly do honor to men who in science have attained some eminence-have in mind that the conditions of their life have been altered just by such technology, of which they may be reluctant to be deprived.
The Open Mind (1955), 89-90.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (19)  |  Alteration (15)  |  Attainment (23)  |  Basis (25)  |  Condition (68)  |  Deprivation (4)  |  Development (122)  |  Emergence (17)  |  Eminence (8)  |  Encouragement (9)  |  Government (50)  |  History (156)  |  Honour (20)  |  Life (460)  |  Men Of Science (90)  |  Pay (8)  |  People (72)  |  Providing (3)  |  Radical (9)  |  Reluctance (2)  |  Response (8)  |  Science (875)  |  Social (16)  |  Substance (39)  |  Technology (98)  |  Testimony (5)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Willing (2)  |  Worthy (4)

The longing to behold this pre-established harmony [of phenomena and theoretical principles] is the source of the inexhaustible patience and perseverance with which Planck has devoted himself ... The state of mind which enables a man to do work of this kind is akin to that of the religious worshiper or the lover; the daily effort comes from no deliberate intention or program, but straight from the heart.
Address (1918) for Max Planck's 60th birthday, at Physical Society, Berlin, 'Principles of Research' in Essays in Science (1934), 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Devotion (12)  |  Harmony (27)  |  Heart (46)  |  Inexhaustible (4)  |  Intention (20)  |  Longing (4)  |  Love (64)  |  Patience (16)  |  Perseverance (10)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Max Planck (54)  |  Program (7)  |  Religion (120)  |  Research (360)  |  Theory (353)  |  Work (198)  |  Worship (11)

The moral principle inherent in evolution, that nothing can be gained in this world without an effort; the ethical principle inherent in evolution is that only the best has the right to survive; the spiritual principle in evolution is the evidence of beauty, of order, and of design in the daily myriad of miracles to which we owe our existence.
'Evolution and Religion', New York Times (5 Mar 1922), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (88)  |  Best (42)  |  Design (37)  |  Ethics (23)  |  Evidence (83)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Existence (150)  |  Gain (23)  |  Inherent (17)  |  Miracle (25)  |  Moral (38)  |  Myriad (8)  |  Nothing (89)  |  Order (60)  |  Principle (97)  |  Right (49)  |  Spiritual (11)  |  Survival (32)

The nucleic acids, as constituents of living organisms, are comparable In importance to proteins. There is evidence that they are Involved In the processes of cell division and growth, that they participate In the transmission of hereditary characters, and that they are important constituents of viruses. An understanding of the molecular structure of the nucleic acids should be of value In the effort to understand the fundamental phenomena of life.
[Co-author with American chemist, B. Corey (1897-1971)]
'A Proposed Structure for the Nucleic Acids', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (1953), 39, 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Cell (90)  |  Character (39)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Constituent (8)  |  Division (19)  |  Fundamental (59)  |  Growth (70)  |  Heredity (43)  |  Importance (106)  |  Life (460)  |  Molecule (82)  |  Organism (70)  |  Participation (4)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Structure (104)  |  Transmission (18)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Value (63)  |  Virus (16)

The overwhelming astonishment, the queerest structure we know about so far in the whole universe, the greatest of all cosmological scientific puzzles, confounding all our efforts to comprehend it, is the earth.
In Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony(1984), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishment (14)  |  Comprehension (30)  |  Confounding (3)  |  Cosmos (23)  |  Earth (250)  |  Greatest (23)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Overwhelming (10)  |  Puzzle (16)  |  Science (875)  |  Structure (104)  |  Universe (291)  |  Whole (46)

The real question is, Did God use evolution as His plan? If it could be shown that man, instead of being made in the image of God, is a development of beasts we would have to accept it, regardless of its effort, for truth is truth and must prevail. But when there is no proof we have a right to consider the effect of the acceptance of an unsupported hypothesis.
'God and Evolution', New York Times (26 Feb 1922), 84. Rebuttals were printed a few days later from Henry Fairfield Osborn and Edwin Grant Conklin.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (31)  |  Beast (14)  |  Consideration (38)  |  Evolution (342)  |  God (234)  |  Hypothesis (150)  |  Image (15)  |  Plan (40)  |  Proof (136)  |  Truth (450)  |  Unsupported (2)

The universality of parasitism as an offshoot of the predatory habit negatives the position taken by man that it is a pathological phenomenon or a deviation from the normal processes of nature. The pathological manifestations are only incidents in a developing parasitism. As human beings intent on maintaining man's domination over nature we may regard parasitism as pathological insofar as it becomes a drain upon human resources. In our efforts to protect ourselves we may make every kind of sacrifice to limit, reduce, and even eliminate parasitism as a factor in human life. Science attempts to define the terms on which this policy of elimination may or may not succeed. We must first of all thoroughly understand the problem, put ourselves in possession of all the facts in order to estimate the cost. Too often it has been assumed that parasitism was abnormal and that it needed only a slight force to reestablish what was believed to be a normal equilibrium without parasitism. On the contrary, biology teaches us that parasitism is a normal phenomenon and if we accept this view we shall be more ready to pay the price of freedom as a permanent and ever recurring levy of nature for immunity from a condition to which all life is subject. The greatest victory of man over nature in the physical realm would undoubtedly be his own delivery from the heavy encumbrance of parasitism with which all life is burdened.
Parasitism and Disease (1934), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (27)  |  Burden (9)  |  Cost (15)  |  Development (122)  |  Deviation (8)  |  Domination (8)  |  Drain (4)  |  Elimination (14)  |  Equilibrium (12)  |  Estimate (8)  |  Fact (325)  |  Habit (42)  |  Human Being (16)  |  Limitation (10)  |  Maintenance (7)  |  Manifestation (21)  |  Nature (534)  |  Pathology (9)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Policy (10)  |  Predator (3)  |  Process (97)  |  Protection (13)  |  Reduction (22)  |  Resource (15)  |  Sacrifice (12)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Universality (9)  |  Victory (10)

There is now a feeling that the pieces of physics are falling into place, not because of any single revolutionary idea or because of the efforts of any one physicist, but because of a flowering of many seeds of theory, most of them planted long ago.
In 'The Forces of Nature', Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (Jan 1976), 29:4, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (226)  |  Physicist (74)  |  Physics (156)  |  Piece (13)  |  Revolutionary (6)  |  Seed (19)  |  Theory (353)

Through the animal and vegetable kingdoms, Nature has scattered the seeds of life abroad with the most profuse and liberal hand; but has been comparatively sparing in the room and the nourishment necessary to rear them. The germs of existence contained in this spot of earth, if they could freely develop themselves, would fill millions of worlds in the course of a few thousand years. Necessity, that imperious all-pervading law of nature, restrains them within the prescribed bounds. The race of plants and the race of animals shrink under this great restrictive law; and man cannot by any efforts of reason escape from it.
In An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798, 4th ed. 1807), Vol. I, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (3)  |  Animal (143)  |  Bound (8)  |  Comparatively (3)  |  Develop (11)  |  Earth (250)  |  Escape (14)  |  Existence (150)  |  Fill (13)  |  Freely (2)  |  Germ (16)  |  Great (62)  |  Hand (34)  |  Kingdom (18)  |  Law (273)  |  Liberal (4)  |  Life (460)  |  Million (29)  |  Nature (534)  |  Necessary (19)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Nourishment (12)  |  Plant (96)  |  Race (36)  |  Rear (4)  |  Reason (173)  |  Room (11)  |  Scattered (2)  |  Shrink (3)  |  Sparing (2)  |  Thousand (32)  |  Vegetable (12)  |  World (231)  |  Year (69)

To use Newton's words, our efforts up till this moment have but turned over a pebble or shell here and there on the beach, with only a forlorn hope that under one of them was the gem we were seeking. Now we have the sieve, the minds, the hands, the time, and, particularly, the dedication to find those gems—no matter in which favorite hiding place the children of distant worlds have placed them.
[Co-author with Dava Sobel.]
In Frank Drake and Dava Sobel, Is Anyone Out There? (1993), 236.
Science quotes on:  |  Beach (7)  |  Dedication (5)  |  Extraterrestrial Life (16)  |  Favorite (8)  |  Forlorn (2)  |  Gem (2)  |  Hide (13)  |  Hope (50)  |  Mind (272)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (176)  |  Pebble (8)  |  Seeking (17)  |  Shell (17)  |  Time (170)

[Ignorance] of the principle of conservation of energy ... does not prevent inventors without background from continually putting forward perpetual motion machines... Also, such persons undoubtedly have their exact counterparts in the fields of art, finance, education, and all other departments of human activity... persons who are unwilling to take the time and to make the effort required to find what the known facts are before they become the champions of unsupported opinions—people who take sides first and look up facts afterward when the tendency to distort the facts to conform to the opinions has become well-nigh irresistible.
In Christian Education (Apr 1927), 10, No. 7, 394-395.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (48)  |  Art (80)  |  Background (13)  |  Conservation Of Energy (17)  |  Continual (5)  |  Counterpart (3)  |  Department (11)  |  Distort (2)  |  Education (177)  |  Fact (325)  |  Human (168)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Inventor (25)  |  Machine (56)  |  Opinion (81)  |  Perpetual Motion (6)  |  Person (38)  |  Prevention (26)  |  Principle (97)  |  Tendency (18)  |  Time (170)  |  Unwilling (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton