Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “God does not care about our mathematical difficulties. He integrates empirically.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Effect

Effect Quotes (72 quotes)

Je me rends parfaitement compte du desagreable effet que produit sur la majorite de l'humanité, tout ce qui se rapporte, même au plus faible dègré, á des calculs ou raisonnements mathematiques.
I am well aware of the disagreeable effect produced on the majority of humanity, by whatever relates, even at the slightest degree to calculations or mathematical reasonings.
From 'French Reply to Baron Czyllak' concerning the game at Monte Carlo, Monte Carlo Facts and Fallacies (1904), 290, originally published in L'Écho de la Mediterranée as a response to an earlier open letter by the Baron in the same magazine. Maxim defended his prior mathematical calculations about gambling games. At the end of his paper giving a cautionary mathematical analysis of 'The Gambler's Ruin', < a href="http://todayinsci.com/C/Coolidge_Julian/CoolidgeJulian-Quotations.htm">Julian Coolidge referenced this quotation, saying “it gives the best explanation which I have seen for the fact that the people continue to gamble.”
Science quotes on:  |  Aware (4)  |  Degree (18)  |  Humanity (46)  |  Majority (17)  |  Mathematical (9)  |  Produced (3)  |  Slightest (2)  |  Whatever (4)

Among those whom I could never pursuade to rank themselves with idlers, and who speak with indignation of my morning sleeps and nocturnal rambles, one passes the day in catching spiders, that he may count their eyes with a microscope; another exhibits the dust of a marigold separated from the flower with a dexterity worthy of Leuwenhoweck himself. Some turn the wheel of electricity; some suspend rings to a lodestone, and find that what they did yesterday, they can do again to-day.—Some register the changes of the wind, and die fully convinced that the wind is changeable.—There are men yet more profound, who have heard that two colorless liquors may produce a color by union, and that two cold bodies will grow hot of they are mingled: they mingle them, and produce the effect expected, say it is strange, and mingle them again.
In Tryon Edwards, A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 243.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Cold (24)  |  Colour (32)  |  Dexterity (3)  |  Dust (20)  |  Electricity (82)  |  Energy (103)  |  Enquiry (72)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Eye (67)  |  Heat (48)  |  Idleness (4)  |  Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (15)  |  Liquid (12)  |  Lodestone (4)  |  Magnetism (20)  |  Meteorology (15)  |  Microscope (47)  |  Mingle (2)  |  Observation (264)  |  Persuade (3)  |  Physics (156)  |  Pollen (3)  |  Profound (23)  |  Reaction (48)  |  Repeat (11)  |  Research (360)  |  Sleep (25)  |  Spider (6)  |  Strange (17)  |  Wind (28)

And for rejecting such a Medium, we have the Authority of those the oldest and most celebrated Philosophers of Greece and Phoenicia, who made a Vacuum, and Atoms, and the Gravity of Atoms, the first Principles of their Philosophy; tacitly attributing Gravity to some other Cause than dense Matter. Later Philosophers banish the Consideration of such a Cause out of natural Philosophy, feigning Hypotheses for explaining all things mechanically, and referring other Causes to Metaphysicks: Whereas the main Business of natural Philosophy is to argue from Phaenomena without feigning Hypotheses, and to deduce Causes from Effects, till we come to the very first Cause, which certainly is not mechanical; and not only to unfold the Mechanism of the World, but chiefly to resolve these and such like Questions. What is there in places almost empty of Matter, and whence is it that the Sun and Planets gravitate towards one another, without dense Matter between them? Whence is it that Nature doth nothing in vain; and whence arises all that Order and Beauty which we see in the World? ... does it not appear from phaenomena that there is a Being incorporeal, living, intelligent, omnipresent, who in infinite space, as it were in his Sensory, sees the things themselves intimately, and thoroughly perceives them, and comprehends them wholly by their immediate presence to himself.
Opticks, 2nd edition (1718), Book 3, Query 28, 343-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Authority (24)  |  Beauty (88)  |  Cause (122)  |  God (234)  |  Gravity (59)  |  Greek (17)  |  Hypothesis (150)  |  Matter (135)  |  Metaphysics (24)  |  Nature (534)  |  Order (60)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Philosopher (67)  |  Question (159)  |  Rejection (16)  |  Vain (15)

And invention must still go on for it is necessary that we should completely control our circumstances. It is not sufficient that there should [only] be organization capable of providing food and shelter for all and organization to effect its proper distribution.
Aphorism listed Frederick Seitz, The Cosmic Inventor: Reginald Aubrey Fessenden (1866-1932) (1999), 54, being Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Held at Philadelphia For Promoting Useful Knowledge, Vol. 86, Pt. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Capability (27)  |  Circumstance (25)  |  Completeness (9)  |  Control (41)  |  Distribution (15)  |  Food (77)  |  Invention (174)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Organization (51)  |  Proper (9)  |  Provision (10)  |  Shelter (5)  |  Sufficiency (13)

As physicists have arranged an extensive series of effects under the general term of Heat, so they have named another series Light, and a third they have called Electricity. We find ... that all these principles are capable of being produced through the medium of living bodies, for nearly all animals have the power of evolving heat; many insects, moreover, can voluntarily emit light; and the property of producing electricity is well evinced in the terrible shock of the electric eel, as well as in that of some other creatures. We are indeed in the habit of talking of the Electric fluid, or the Galvanic fluid, but this in reality is nothing but a licence of expression suitable to our finite and material notions.
In the Third Edition of Elements of Electro-Metallurgy: or The Art of Working in Metals by the Galvanic Fluid (1851), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (143)  |  Creature (51)  |  Electricity (82)  |  Expression (44)  |  Finding (19)  |  Habit (42)  |  Heat (48)  |  Insect (38)  |  Light (117)  |  Living Body (2)  |  Nothing (89)  |  Notion (15)  |  Physicist (74)  |  Principle (97)  |  Production (72)  |  Reality (67)  |  Shock (7)  |  Terrible (4)

As the component parts of all new machines may be said to be old[,] it is a nice discriminating judgment, which discovers that a particular arrangement will produce a new and desired effect. ... Therefore, the mechanic should sit down among levers, screws, wedges, wheels, etc. like a poet among the letters of the alphabet, considering them as the exhibition of his thoughts; in which a new arrangement transmits a new idea to the world.
A Treatise on the Improvement of Canal Navigation (1796), preface, x.
Science quotes on:  |  Alphabet (4)  |  Arrangement (25)  |  Component (6)  |  Consideration (38)  |  Desire (46)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Discrimination (4)  |  Exhibit (3)  |  Idea (226)  |  Judgment (39)  |  Letter (16)  |  Lever (7)  |  Machine (56)  |  Mechanic (3)  |  New (107)  |  Old (23)  |  Part (55)  |  Particular (24)  |  Poet (26)  |  Production (72)  |  Screw (3)  |  Thought (170)  |  Transmission (18)  |  Wedge (2)  |  Wheel (8)

At the end of the book [Zoonomia] he sums up his [Erasmus Darwin] views in the following sentences: “The world has been evolved, not created: it has arisen little by little from a small beginning, and has increased through the activity of the elemental forces embodied in itself, and so has rather grown than come into being at an almighty word.” “What a sublime idea of the infinite might of the great Architect, the Cause of all causes, the Father of all fathers, the Ens Entium! For if we would compare the Infinite, it would surely require a greater Infinite to cause the causes of effects than to produce the effects themselves.”
[This is a restatement, not a verbatim quote of the original words of Erasmus Darwin, who attributed the idea he summarized to David Hume.]
In August Weismann, John Arthur Thomson (trans.), Margaret R. Thomson (trans.) The Evolution Theory (1904), Vol. 1, 17-18. The verbatim form of the quote from Zoonomia, in context, can be seen on the webpage here for Erasmus Darwin. Later authors have quoted from Weismann's translated book, and given the reworded passage as a direct quote by Erasmus Darwin. Webmaster has found a verbatim form in Zoonomia (1794), but has been unable to find the wording used by Weismann in any primary source by Erasmus Darwin. The rewording is perhaps due to the translation of the quote into German for Weismann's original book, Vorträge über Descendenztheorie (1902) followed by another translation for the English edition.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (48)  |  Almighty (2)  |  Architect (4)  |  Beginning (71)  |  Cause (122)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Creation (129)  |  Erasmus Darwin (35)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Father (17)  |  Force (75)  |  Growth (70)  |  Idea (226)  |  Increase (36)  |  Infinity (44)  |  Sublime (10)

Can a physicist visualize an electron? The electron is materially inconceivable and yet, it is so perfectly known through its effects that we use it to illuminate our cities, guide our airlines through the night skies and take the most accurate measurements. What strange rationale makes some physicists accept the inconceivable electrons as real while refusing to accept the reality of a Designer on the ground that they cannot conceive Him?
In letter to California State board of Education (14 Sep 1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (34)  |  Airplane (16)  |  Designer (6)  |  Electron (43)  |  God (234)  |  Illumination (9)  |  Inconceivable (2)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Material (60)  |  Measurement (112)  |  Physicist (74)  |  Reality (67)  |  Refusal (11)  |  Science And Religion (159)

Certain students of genetics inferred that the Mendelian units responsible for the selected character were genes producing only a single effect. This was careless logic. It took a good deal of hammering to get rid of this erroneous idea. As facts accumulated it became evident that each gene produces not a single effect, but in some cases a multitude of effects on the characters of the individual. It is true that in most genetic work only one of these character-effects is selected for study—the one that is most sharply defined and separable from its contrasted character—but in most cases minor differences also are recognizable that are just as much the product of the same gene as is the major effect.
'The Relation of Genetics to Physiology and Medicine', Nobel Lecture (4 Jun 1934). In Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1922-1941 (1965), 317.
Science quotes on:  |  Character (39)  |  Difference (135)  |  Evidence (83)  |  Fact (325)  |  Gene (49)  |  Genetics (79)  |  Inference (16)  |  Gregor Mendel (18)  |  Recognize (11)  |  Student (54)  |  Study (157)

Detection is, or ought to be, an exact science, and should be treated in the same cold unemotional manner. You have attempted to tinge it with romanticism, which produces the same effect as if you worked a love-story into the fifth proposition of Euclid.
By Sherlock Holmes to Dr. Watson, fictional characters in The Sign of Four (1890), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (41)  |  Cold (24)  |  Detection (6)  |  Euclid (24)  |  Exact (16)  |  Manner (11)  |  Production (72)  |  Proposition (28)  |  Romanticism (3)  |  Science (875)  |  Tinge (2)  |  Treatment (61)

EFFECT, n. The second of two phenomena which always occur together in the same order. The first, called a Cause, is said to generate the other—which is no more sensible than it would be for one who has never seen a dog except in pursuit of a rabbit to declare the rabbit the cause of the dog.
The Cynic's Word Book (1906), 86. Later published as The Devil's Dictionary.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (122)  |  Declare (5)  |  Dog (24)  |  Generate (3)  |  Occur (8)  |  Order (60)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Pursuit (34)  |  Rabbit (4)  |  Same (15)  |  Sensible (11)  |  Together (15)

Error held as truth has much the effect of truth. In politics and religion this fact upsets many confident predictions.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-Book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Confident (2)  |  Error (152)  |  Fact (325)  |  Hold (21)  |  Politics (52)  |  Prediction (48)  |  Religion (120)  |  Truth (450)  |  Upset (4)

Every occurrence in Nature is preceded by other occurrences which are its causes, and succeeded by others which are its effects. The human mind is not satisfied with observing and studying any natural occurrence alone, but takes pleasure in connecting every natural fact with what has gone before it, and with what is to come after it.
In Forms of Water in Clouds and Rivers, Ice and Glaciers (1872), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Before (6)  |  Cause (122)  |  Connection (39)  |  Fact (325)  |  Human Mind (21)  |  Nature (534)  |  Observation (264)  |  Occurrence (21)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Preceding (4)  |  Satisfaction (31)  |  Study (157)

Experiments may be of two kinds: experiments of simple fact, and experiments of quantity. ...[In the latter] the conditions will ... vary, not in quality, but quantity, and the effect will also vary in quantity, so that the result of quantitative induction is also to arrive at some mathematical expression involving the quantity of each condition, and expressing the quantity of the result. In other words, we wish to know what function the effect is of its conditions. We shall find that it is one thing to obtain the numerical results, and quite another thing to detect the law obeyed by those results, the latter being an operation of an inverse and tentative character.
Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method (1874, 1892), 439.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (68)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Expression (44)  |  Fact (325)  |  Function (41)  |  Induction (22)  |  Law (273)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Numerical (3)  |  Quality (29)  |  Quantitative (9)  |  Quantity (23)  |  Result (129)  |  Variation (34)

How much has happened in these fifty years—a period more remarkable than any, I will venture to say, in the annals of mankind. I am not thinking of the rise and fall of Empires, the change of dynasties, the establishment of Governments. I am thinking of those revolutions of science which have had much more effect than any political causes, which have changed the position and prospects of mankind more than all the conquests and all the codes and all the legislators that ever lived.
Banquet speech, Glasgow. In Nature (27 Nov 1873), 9, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Annal (2)  |  Cause (122)  |  Change (133)  |  Code (8)  |  Conquest (7)  |  Dynasty (4)  |  Empire (6)  |  Establishment (19)  |  Fall (30)  |  Government (50)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Politics (52)  |  Position (18)  |  Prospect (8)  |  Revolution (34)  |  Rise (14)  |  Science (875)  |  Thinking (166)

Human behaviour reveals uniformities which constitute natural laws. If these uniformities did not exist, then there would be neither social science nor political economy, and even the study of history would largely be useless. In effect, if the future actions of men having nothing in common with their past actions, our knowledge of them, although possibly satisfying our curiosity by way of an interesting story, would be entirely useless to us as a guide in life.
Cours d'Economie Politique (1896-7), Vol. 2, 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (57)  |  Behaviour (23)  |  Common (44)  |  Constitution (12)  |  Curiosity (52)  |  Economy (25)  |  Existence (150)  |  Future (110)  |  History (156)  |  Human (168)  |  Interest (82)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Law (273)  |  Man (258)  |  Natural (48)  |  Nothing (89)  |  Past (42)  |  Politics (52)  |  Possibility (70)  |  Revelation (24)  |  Social Science (17)  |  Story (16)  |  Study (157)  |  Uniformity (12)  |  Uselessness (19)

I am inclined to think I shall owe ten years of my life to the good effects of the gas, for I inhale about 20 gallons every day in showing patients how to commence. The gas is just like air, only containing a little more oxygen. Oxygen is what gives life and vitality to the blood. We live on oxygen.
Quoted in The Electrical Review (11 Aug 1893), Vol. 33, 143.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Blood (63)  |  Gas (30)  |  Nitrous Oxide (2)  |  Oxygen (34)  |  Vitality (7)

I had at one time a very bad fever of which I almost died. In my fever I had a long consistent delirium. I dreamt that I was in Hell, and that Hell is a place full of all those happenings that are improbable but not impossible. The effects of this are curious. Some of the damned, when they first arrive below, imagine that they will beguile the tedium of eternity by games of cards. But they find this impossible, because, whenever a pack is shuffled, it comes out in perfect order, beginning with the Ace of Spades and ending with the King of Hearts. There is a special department of Hell for students of probability. In this department there are many typewriters and many monkeys. Every time that a monkey walks on a typewriter, it types by chance one of Shakespeare's sonnets. There is another place of torment for physicists. In this there are kettles and fires, but when the kettles are put on the fires, the water in them freezes. There are also stuffy rooms. But experience has taught the physicists never to open a window because, when they do, all the air rushes out and leaves the room a vacuum.
'The Metaphysician's Nightmare', Nightmares of Eminent Persons and Other Stories (1954), 38-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrival (7)  |  Curiosity (52)  |  Damned (2)  |  Death (183)  |  Department (11)  |  Dream (39)  |  Eternity (22)  |  Experience (132)  |  Fever (5)  |  Fire (59)  |  Freeze (3)  |  Game (28)  |  Happening (23)  |  Hell (13)  |  Imagination (130)  |  Impossibility (32)  |  Improbable (3)  |  Kettle (2)  |  Monkey (26)  |  Opening (8)  |  Order (60)  |  Perfection (43)  |  Physicist (74)  |  Possibility (70)  |  Room (11)  |  Rush (5)  |  William Shakespeare (63)  |  Shuffle (3)  |  Sonnet (3)  |  Special (25)  |  Torment (5)  |  Typewriter (6)  |  Vacuum (16)  |  Walk (24)  |  Water (122)  |  Window (11)

I will insist particularly upon the following fact, which seems to me quite important and beyond the phenomena which one could expect to observe: The same [double sulfate of uranium and potassium] crystalline crusts, arranged the same way [as reported to the French academy on 24 Feb 1896] with respect to the photographic plates, in the same conditions and through the same screens, but sheltered from the excitation of incident rays and kept in darkness, still produce the same photographic images ... [when kept from 26 Feb 1896] in the darkness of a bureau drawer. ... I developed the photographic plates on the 1st of March, expecting to find the images very weak. Instead the silhouettes appeared with great intensity.
It is important to observe that it appears this phenomenon must not be attributed to the luminous radiation emitted by phosphorescence ... One hypothesis which presents itself to the mind naturally enough would be to suppose that these rays, whose effects have a great similarity to the effects produced by the rays studied by M. Lenard and M. Röntgen, are invisible rays ...
[Having eliminated phosphorescence as a cause, he has further revealed the effect of the as yet unknown radioactivity.]
Read at French Academy of Science (2 Mar 1896). In Comptes Rendus (1896), 122, 501. As translated by Carmen Giunta on the Classic Chemistry web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (360)  |  Hypothesis (150)  |  Invisible (10)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Phosphorescence (2)  |  Photograph (14)  |  Radioactivity (21)  |  Ray (19)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (7)  |  Uranium (13)

I'd like the [Cosmos] series to be so visually stimulating that somebody who isn't even interested in the concepts will just watch for the effects. And I'd like people who are prepared to do some thinking to be really stimulated.
Quoted by Dennis Meredith, in 'Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection and Extraterrestrial Life-Wish', Science Digest (Jun 1979), 85, 38. Reproduced in Carl Sagan and Tom Head, Conversations With Sagan (2006), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Concept (38)  |  Cosmos (23)  |  Interest (82)  |  Person (38)  |  Series (18)  |  Stimulation (7)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Visualize (2)

If the greenhouse effect is a blanket in which we wrap ourselves to keep warm, nuclear winter kicks the blanket off.
[co-author with American atmospheric chemist Richard P. Turco (1943- )]
A Path Where No Man Thought: Nuclear Winter and the End of the Arms Race (1990), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Blanket (3)  |  Greenhouse (2)  |  Kick (3)  |  Nuclear (13)  |  Warmth (4)  |  Winter (11)  |  Wrap (2)

If the Weismann idea triumphs, it will be in a sense a triumph of fatalism; for, according to it, while we may indefinitely improve the forces of our education and surroundings, and this civilizing nurture will improve the individuals of each generation, its actual effects will not be cumulative as regards the race itself, but only as regards the environment of the race; each new generation must start de novo, receiving no increment of the moral and intellectual advance made during the lifetime of its predecessors. It would follow that one deep, almost instinctive motive for a higher life would be removed if the race were only superficially benefited by its nurture, and the only possible channel of actual improvement were in the selection of the fittest chains of race plasma.
'The Present Problem of Heredity', The Atlantic Monthly (1891), 57, 363.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (26)  |  Benefit (21)  |  Chain (21)  |  Channel (6)  |  Civilization (90)  |  Cumulative (2)  |  Education (177)  |  Environment (75)  |  Fit (12)  |  Generation (56)  |  Heredity (43)  |  Idea (226)  |  Improvement (36)  |  Increment (2)  |  Indefinitely (3)  |  Individual (59)  |  Instinct (24)  |  Intellect (99)  |  Life (460)  |  Lifetime (10)  |  Moral (38)  |  Motive (9)  |  Nurture (6)  |  Plasma (6)  |  Possibility (70)  |  Predecessor (13)  |  Race (36)  |  Removal (8)  |  Selection (20)  |  Superficial (6)  |  Surrounding (5)  |  Triumph (21)  |  August Weismann (5)

In reality, all Arguments from Experience are founded on the Similarity which we discover among natural Objects, and by which we are induc'd to expect effects similar to those which we have found to follow from such Objects. And tho' none but a Fool or Madman will ever pretend to dispute the Authority of Experience, or to reject that great Guide of human Life, it may surely be allow'd a Philosopher to have so much Curiosity at least as to examine the Principle of human Nature, which gives this mighty Authority to Experience, and makes us draw Advantage from that Similarity which Nature has plac'd among different Objects. From Causes which appear similar we expect similar Effects. This is the Sum of our experimental Conclusions.
An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Conclusion (74)  |  Experience (132)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Fool (32)  |  Human Nature (34)  |  Philosopher (67)  |  Similarity (14)

In the year 1666 he retired again from Cambridge... to his mother in Lincolnshire & whilst he was musing in a garden it came into his thought that the power of gravity (wch brought an apple from the tree to the ground) was not limited to a certain distance from the earth but that this power must extend much farther than was usually thought. Why not as high as the moon said he to himself & if so that must influence her motion & perhaps retain her in her orbit, whereupon he fell a calculating what would be the effect of that supposition but being absent from books & taking the common estimate in use among Geographers & our seamen before Norwood had measured the earth, that 60 English miles were contained in one degree of latitude on the surface of the Earth his computation did not agree with his theory & inclined him then to entertain a notion that together with the force of gravity there might be a mixture of that force wch the moon would have if it was carried along in a vortex.
[The earliest account of Newton, gravity and an apple.]
Memorandum of a conversation with Newton in August 1726. Quoted in Richard Westfall, Never at Rest: A Biography of Isaac Newton (1980), 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Absent (2)  |  Apple (13)  |  Calculation (41)  |  Computation (7)  |  Earth (250)  |  Estimate (8)  |  Force (75)  |  Garden (10)  |  Gravity (59)  |  Ground (18)  |  Mixture (11)  |  Moon (78)  |  Motion (64)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (176)  |  Notion (15)  |  Orbit (36)  |  Supposition (25)  |  Theory (353)  |  Tree (88)

Indeed, we need not look back half a century to times which many now living remember well, and see the wonderful advances in the sciences and arts which have been made within that period. Some of these have rendered the elements themselves subservient to the purposes of man, have harnessed them to the yoke of his labors and effected the great blessings of moderating his own, of accomplishing what was beyond his feeble force, and extending the comforts of life to a much enlarged circle, to those who had before known its necessaries only.
From paper 'Report of the Commissioners Appointed to Fix the Site of the University of Virginia' (Dec 1818), reprinted in Annual Report of the Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia for the Fiscal Year Ending May 31, 1879 (1879), 10. Collected in Commonwealth of Virginia, Annual Reports of Officers, Boards, and Institutions of the Commonwealth of Virginia, for the Year Ending September 30, 1879 (1879).
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplish (2)  |  Advance (52)  |  Back (17)  |  Blessing (4)  |  Century (38)  |  Circle (10)  |  Comfort (18)  |  Element (68)  |  Enlarge (3)  |  Feeble (2)  |  Force (75)  |  Harness (8)  |  Labor (18)  |  Life (460)  |  Living (24)  |  Look (32)  |  Man (258)  |  Necessary (19)  |  Period (24)  |  Purpose (66)  |  Remember (19)  |  Render (9)  |  Science And Art (58)  |  Subservient (2)  |  Time (170)  |  Wonderful (9)

Instead of saying that a man behaves because of the consequences which are to follow his behavior, we simply say that he behaves because of the consequences which have followed similar behavior in the past. This is, of course, the Law of Effect or operant conditioning.
Science and Human Behavior (1953), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Behavior (13)  |  Conditioning (2)  |  Consequence (44)  |  Law (273)  |  Man (258)

It is curious how often erroneous theories have had a beneficial effect for particular branches of science.
The Growth of Biological Thought: Diversity, Evolution and Inheritance (1982), 847.
Science quotes on:  |  Beneficial (6)  |  Curiosity (52)  |  Error (152)  |  Science (875)  |  Theory (353)

It is folly to think that we can destroy one species and ecosystem after another and not affect humanity. When we save species, we’re actually saving ourselves.
On the 'About' page of his web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (44)  |  Destruction (52)  |  Ecosystem (10)  |  Humanity (46)  |  Save (13)  |  Species (96)

It was basic research in the photoelectric field—in the photoelectric effect that would one day lead to solar panels. It was basic research in physics that would eventually produce the CAT scan. The calculations of today's GPS satellites are based on the equations that Einstein put to paper more than a century ago.
Speech to the National Academy of Sciences Annual Meeting (27 Apr 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (18)  |  Calculation (41)  |  Century (38)  |  Albert Einstein (174)  |  Equation (46)  |  Paper (25)  |  Physics (156)  |  Research (360)  |  Satellite (12)  |  Solar (4)

Leo Szilard’s Ten Commandments:
1. Recognize the connections of things and the laws of conduct of men, so that you may know what you are doing.
2. Let your acts be directed towards a worthy goal, but do not ask if they will reach it; they are to be models and examples, not means to an end.
3. Speak to all men as you do to yourself, with no concern for the effect you make, so that you do not shut them out from your world; lest in isolation the meaning of life slips out of sight and you lose the belief in the perfection of the creation.
4. Do not destroy what you cannot create.
5. Touch no dish, except that you are hungry.
6. Do not covet what you cannot have.
7. Do not lie without need.
8. Honor children. Listen reverently to their words and speak to them with infinite love.
9. Do your work for six years; but in the seventh, go into solitude or among strangers, so that the memory of your friends does not hinder you from being what you have become.
10. Lead your life with a gentle hand and be ready to leave whenever you are called.
Circulated by Mrs. Szilard in July 1964, in a letter to their friends (translated by Dr. Jacob Bronowski). As printed in Robert J. Levine, Ethics and Regulation of Clinical Research (1988), 431.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (139)  |  Child (90)  |  Concern (30)  |  Conduct (8)  |  Connection (39)  |  Creation (129)  |  Destruction (52)  |  Example (21)  |  Friend (22)  |  Goal (36)  |  Honor (3)  |  Hunger (7)  |  Isolation (16)  |  Law (273)  |  Lie (23)  |  Life (460)  |  Listen (4)  |  Love (64)  |  Meaning (52)  |  Memory (42)  |  Model (31)  |  Need (57)  |  Perfection (43)  |  Recognition (38)  |  Solitude (5)  |  Speaking (30)  |  Stranger (7)  |  Work (198)

Man is made for science; he reasons from effects to causes, and from causes to effects; but he does not always reason without error. In reasoning, therefore, from appearances which are particular, care must be taken how we generalize; we should be cautious not to attribute to nature, laws which may perhaps be only of our own invention.
'Theory of the Earth', Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 1788, 1, 273.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (122)  |  Error (152)  |  Generalize (5)  |  Law (273)  |  Man (258)  |  Nature (534)  |  Reason (173)  |  Science (875)

Misuse of reason might yet return the world to pre-technological night; plenty of religious zealots hunger for just such a result, and are happy to use the latest technology to effect it.
The Heart of Things: Applying Philosophy to the 21st Century (2006).
Science quotes on:  |  Happiness (58)  |  Hunger (7)  |  Misuse (6)  |  Night (26)  |  Plenty (2)  |  Reason (173)  |  Religion (120)  |  Result (129)  |  Return (13)  |  Technology (98)  |  World (231)

Natural powers, principally those of steam and falling water, are subsidized and taken into human employment Spinning-machines, power-looms, and all the mechanical devices, acting, among other operatives, in the factories and work-shops, are but so many laborers. They are usually denominated labor-saving machines, but it would be more just to call them labor-doing machines. They are made to be active agents; to have motion, and to produce effect; and though without intelligence, they are guided by laws of science, which are exact and perfect, and they produce results, therefore, in general, more accurate than the human hand is capable of producing.
Speech in Senate (12 Mar 1838). In The Writings and Speeches of Daniel Webster (1903), Vol. 8, 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (34)  |  Active (6)  |  Agent (13)  |  Capability (27)  |  Device (15)  |  Employment (16)  |  Exact (16)  |  Factory (7)  |  Falling (3)  |  Hand (34)  |  Human (168)  |  Intelligence (76)  |  Labor-Saving (2)  |  Law (273)  |  Machine (56)  |  Mechanical (11)  |  Motion (64)  |  Natural (48)  |  Perfect (14)  |  Power (103)  |  Principal (6)  |  Production (72)  |  Result (129)  |  Science (875)  |  Steam (15)  |  Water (122)  |  Workshop (5)

Not only do the various components of the cells form a living system, in which the capacity to live, react, and reproduce is dependent on the interactions of all the members of the system; but this living system is identical with the genetic system. The form of life is determined not only by the specific nature of the hereditary units but also by the structure and arrangement of the system. The whole system is more than the sum of its parts, and the effect of each of the components depends on and is influenced by all previous reactions, whose sequence is in turn determined by the whole idiotype.
'Cytoplasmic Inheritance in Epilobium and Its Theoretical Significance', Advances in Genetics (1954), 6, 320.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (25)  |  Cell (90)  |  Component (6)  |  Dependent (2)  |  Genetics (79)  |  Interaction (11)  |  Life (460)  |  Member (9)  |  Part (55)  |  Reaction (48)  |  Reproduction (34)  |  Sequence (15)  |  Structure (104)  |  Sum (18)  |  System (66)

One summer day, while I was walking along the country road on the farm where I was born, a section of the stone wall opposite me, and not more than three or four yards distant, suddenly fell down. Amid the general stillness and immobility about me the effect was quite startling. ... It was the sudden summing up of half a century or more of atomic changes in the material of the wall. A grain or two of sand yielded to the pressure of long years, and gravity did the rest.
Under the Apple-Trees (1916), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (164)  |  Change (133)  |  Country (43)  |  Entropy (25)  |  Fall (30)  |  Farm (4)  |  Grain (10)  |  Gravity (59)  |  Material (60)  |  Pressure (18)  |  Road (18)  |  Sand (9)  |  Section (2)  |  Startling (4)  |  Stillness (3)  |  Stone (20)  |  Suddenness (3)  |  Sum (18)  |  Summer (10)  |  Walk (24)  |  Wall (10)  |  Yielding (2)

Our contemporary culture, primed by population growth and driven by technology, has created problems of environmental degradation that directly affect all of our senses: noise, odors and toxins which bring physical pain and suffering, and ugliness, barrenness, and homogeneity of experience which bring emotional and psychological suffering and emptiness. In short, we are jeopardizing our human qualities by pursuing technology as an end rather than a means. Too often we have failed to ask two necessary questions: First, what human purpose will a given technology or development serve? Second, what human and environmental effects will it have?
Report of the Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollution (7 Aug 1969). 'Environmental Quality: Summary and Discussion of Major Provisions', U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Legal Compilation, (Jan 1973), Water, Vol. 3, 1365. EPA website.
Science quotes on:  |  Barrenness (2)  |  Contemporary (10)  |  Culture (44)  |  Degradation (6)  |  Development (122)  |  Drive (14)  |  Emotion (28)  |  Environment (75)  |  Experience (132)  |  Noise (13)  |  Odor (5)  |  Pain (49)  |  Population Growth (4)  |  Problem (180)  |  Purpose (66)  |  Question (159)  |  Sense (104)  |  Suffering (20)  |  Technology (98)  |  Toxin (4)

Science affects the average man and woman in two ways already. He or she benefits by its application driving a motor-car or omnibus instead of a horse-drawn vehicle, being treated for disease by a doctor or surgeon rather than a witch, and being killed with an automatic pistol or shell in place of a dagger or a battle-axe.
'The Scientific Point of View' In R.C. Prasad (ed.), Modern Essays: Studying Language Through Literature (1987), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (72)  |  Automatic (8)  |  Average (16)  |  Benefit (21)  |  Dagger (2)  |  Death (183)  |  Disease (170)  |  Doctor (54)  |  Driving (4)  |  Horse (17)  |  Killing (9)  |  Motor Car (2)  |  Science (875)  |  Shell (17)  |  Surgeon (29)  |  Treatment (61)  |  Vehicle (3)  |  Way (31)  |  Witch (2)

Science can have a purifying effect on religion, freeing it from beliefs of a pre-scientific age and helping us to a truer conception of God. At the same time, I am far from believing that science will ever give us the answers to all our questions.
Essay 'Science Will Never Give Us the Answers to All Our Questions', collected in Henry Margenau, and Roy Abraham Varghese (eds.), Cosmos, Bios, Theos (1992), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (60)  |  Answer (96)  |  Belief (139)  |  Conception (29)  |  Freeing (2)  |  God (234)  |  Help (18)  |  Pre-Scientific (2)  |  Purify (2)  |  Question (159)  |  Religion (120)  |  Science (875)

The discovery of an interaction among the four hemes made it obvious that they must be touching, but in science what is obvious is not necessarily true. When the structure of hemoglobin was finally solved, the hemes were found to lie in isolated pockets on the surface of the subunits. Without contact between them how could one of them sense whether the others had combined with oxygen? And how could as heterogeneous a collection of chemical agents as protons, chloride ions, carbon dioxide, and diphosphoglycerate influence the oxygen equilibrium curve in a similar way? It did not seem plausible that any of them could bind directly to the hemes or that all of them could bind at any other common site, although there again it turned out we were wrong. To add to the mystery, none of these agents affected the oxygen equilibrium of myoglobin or of isolated subunits of hemoglobin. We now know that all the cooperative effects disappear if the hemoglobin molecule is merely split in half, but this vital clue was missed. Like Agatha Christie, Nature kept it to the last to make the story more exciting. There are two ways out of an impasse in science: to experiment or to think. By temperament, perhaps, I experimented, whereas Jacques Monod thought.
From essay 'The Second Secret of Life', collected in I Wish I'd Made You Angry Earlier (1998), 263-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (13)  |  Binding (6)  |  Carbon Dioxide (14)  |  Chemical (38)  |  Agatha Christie (4)  |  Clue (7)  |  Collection (26)  |  Combination (37)  |  Common (44)  |  Contact (12)  |  Cooperation (15)  |  Curve (9)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Equilibrium (12)  |  Excitement (20)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Half (9)  |  Heterogeneity (3)  |  Interaction (11)  |  Ion (5)  |  Isolation (16)  |  Molecule (82)  |  Jacques Monod (20)  |  Mystery (74)  |  Nature (534)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Obvious (24)  |  Oxygen (34)  |  Pocket (4)  |  Proton (7)  |  Science (875)  |  Sense (104)  |  Site (5)  |  Solution (109)  |  Split (4)  |  Story (16)  |  Structure (104)  |  Surface (37)  |  Temperament (3)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Thought (170)  |  Touch (19)  |  Truth (450)  |  Vital (10)  |  Wrong (50)

The effect of a concept-driven revolution is to explain old things in new ways. The effect of a tool-driven revolution is to discover new things that have to be explained.
In Imagined Worlds (1997), 50-51.
Science quotes on:  |  Concept (38)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Explanation (88)  |  New (107)  |  Revolution (34)  |  Tool (30)

The end of our foundation [Salomon's House in the New Atlantis] is the knowledge of Causes and the secret motions of things; and the enlarging of the bounds of Human Empire, to the effecting of all things possible.
In Francis Bacon and William Rawle (ed.), The Works of Francis Bacon: Philosophical Works (1887), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Bound (8)  |  Cause (122)  |  Empire (6)  |  Enlargement (5)  |  Human (168)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Motion (64)  |  Possibility (70)  |  Secret (44)  |  Thing (27)

The first effect of the mind growing cultivated is that processes once multiple get to be performed in a single act. Lazarus has called this the progressive “condensation” of thought. ... Steps really sink from sight. An advanced thinker sees the relations of his topics is such masses and so instantaneously that when he comes to explain to younger minds it is often hard ... Bowditch, who translated and annotated Laplace's Méchanique Céleste, said that whenever his author prefaced a proposition by the words “it is evident,” he knew that many hours of hard study lay before him.
In The Principles of Psychology (1918), Vol. 2, 369-370.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (22)  |  Advanced (2)  |  Nathaniel Bowditch (2)  |  Condensation (6)  |  Cultivation (7)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Hard (18)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (45)  |  Mind (272)  |  Multiple (6)  |  Performance (16)  |  Preface (2)  |  Process (97)  |  Progressive (5)  |  Proposition (28)  |  Relation (35)  |  Sight (12)  |  Single (26)  |  Sink (6)  |  Sophistication (6)  |  Step (26)  |  Study (157)  |  Thinker (6)  |  Thought (170)  |  Topic (2)

The investigation of causal relations between economic phenomena presents many problems of peculiar difficulty, and offers many opportunities for fallacious conclusions. Since the statistician can seldom or never make experiments for himself, he has to accept the data of daily experience, and discuss as best he can the relations of a whole group of changes; he cannot, like the physicist, narrow down the issue to the effect of one variation at a time. The problems of statistics are in this sense far more complex than the problems of physics.
Udny Yule
In 'On the Theory of Correlation', Journal of the Royal Statistical Society (Dec 1897), 60, 812, as cited in Stephen M. Stigler, The History of Statistics: The Measurement of Uncertainty Before 1900 (1986), 348.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (122)  |  Change (133)  |  Complexity (51)  |  Conclusion (74)  |  Data (59)  |  Difficulty (76)  |  Economics (19)  |  Experience (132)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Investigation (83)  |  Narrow (10)  |  Opportunity (20)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Physicist (74)  |  Physics (156)  |  Problem (180)  |  Relation (35)  |  Statistician (3)  |  Statistics (82)  |  Time (170)  |  Variation (34)

The late Mr. David Hume, in his posthumous works, places the powers of generation much above those of our boasted reason; and adds, that reason can only make a machine, as a clock or a ship, but the power of generation makes the maker of the machine; ... he concludes, that the world itself might have been generated, rather than created ; that is, it might have been gradually produced from very small beginnings, increasing by the activity of its inherent principles, rather than by a sudden evolution of the whole by the Almighty fiat.—What a magnificent idea of the infinite power of THE GREAT ARCHITECT! THE CAUSE OF CAUSES! PARENT OF PARENTS! ENS ENTIUM!
For if we may compare infinities, it would seem to require a greater infinity of power to cause the causes of effects, than to cause the effects themselves.
'Generation', Zoonomia (1794), Vol. 1, 509. Note that this passage was restated in a 1904 translation of a book by August Weismann. That rewording was given in quotation marks and attributed to Erasumus Darwin without reference to David Hume. In the reworded form, it is seen in a number of later works as a direct quote made by Erasmus Darwin. For that restated form see the webpage for August Weismann. Webmaster has checked the quotation on this webpage in the original Zoonomia, and is the only verbatim form found so far.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (48)  |  Almighty (2)  |  Beginning (71)  |  Boast (6)  |  Cause (122)  |  Clock (14)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Creation (129)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Fiat (2)  |  Generation (56)  |  Gradually (2)  |  David Hume (29)  |  Infinity (44)  |  Inherent (17)  |  Machine (56)  |  Maker (4)  |  Power (103)  |  Reason (173)  |  Ship (18)  |  Sudden (6)  |  August Weismann (5)  |  Whole (46)

The laws of nature are the rules according to which the effects are produced; but there must be a cause which operates according to these rules. The laws of navigation never navigated a ship. The rules of architecture never built a house.
'Essay I On the Phenomena of Nature', Essays on the Active Powers of Man (1785), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (24)  |  Building (34)  |  Cause (122)  |  House (19)  |  Law Of Nature (30)  |  Navigation (6)  |  Operation (53)  |  Production (72)  |  Rule (52)  |  Ship (18)

The maxim of science is simply that of common sense—simple cases first; begin with seeing how the main force acts when there is as little as possible to impede it, and when you thoroughly comprehend that, add to it in succession the separate effects of each of the incumbering and interfering agencies.
Collected in The Works of Walter Bagehot (1889), Vol. 5, 319-320.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (22)  |  Add (4)  |  Agency (5)  |  Begin (5)  |  Case (16)  |  Common Sense (34)  |  Comprehend (4)  |  First (42)  |  Force (75)  |  Impede (2)  |  Little (29)  |  Main (6)  |  Maxim (7)  |  Possible (19)  |  Science (875)  |  Separate (9)  |  Simple (25)  |  Succession (30)  |  Thoroughly (3)

The only distinct meaning of the word “natural” is stated, fixed, or settled; since what is natural as much requires and presupposes an intelligent agent to render it so, i.e. to effect it continually or at stated times, as what is supernatural or miraculous does to effect it for once.
In The Analogy of Revealed Religion, Natural and Revealed, to the Constitution and Course of Nature (1791), 43. Charles Darwin placed this quote on the title page of his On the Origin of Species.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (13)  |  Fixed (6)  |  Intelligent (5)  |  Meaning (52)  |  Miraculous (3)  |  Natural (48)  |  Presuppose (2)  |  Render (9)  |  Requirement (27)  |  Settled (2)  |  Supernatural (8)  |  Word (97)

The philosophy that I have worked under most of my life is that the serious study of natural history is an activity which has far-reaching effects in every aspect of a person's life. It ultimately makes people protective of the environment in a very committed way. It is my opinion that the study of natural history should be the primary avenue for creating environmentalists.
As quoted in William V. Mealy, ‎Peter Friederici and ‎Roger Tory Peterson Institute, Value in American Wildlife Art: Proceedings of the 1992 Forum (1992), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (48)  |  Aspect (16)  |  Avenue (2)  |  Create (15)  |  Environment (75)  |  Environmentalist (4)  |  Far-Reaching (2)  |  Life (460)  |  Make (10)  |  Natural History (23)  |  Opinion (81)  |  Person (38)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Primary (9)  |  Protective (2)  |  Serious (13)  |  Study (157)  |  Ultimately (3)  |  Work (198)

The plough is to the farmer what the wand is to the sorcerer. Its effect is really like sorcery.
Jefferson to Charles Willson Peale, Monticello (17 Apr 1813). In Edwin Morris Betts (ed.) Thomas Jefferson's Farm Book (2002), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Farmer (9)  |  Plough (4)

The simplicity of nature is not to be measured by that of our conceptions. Infinitely varied in its effects, nature is simple only in its causes, and its economy consists in producing a great number of phenomena, often very complicated, by means of a small number of general laws.
Philosophical Essay on Probabilities (1825), trans. Andrew I. Dale (1995), book 1, chap. 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (122)  |  Complicated (14)  |  Conception (29)  |  Economy (25)  |  Law (273)  |  Nature (534)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Variation (34)

The star [Tycho's supernova] was at first like Venus and Jupiter, giving pleasing effects; but as it then became like Mars, there will next come a period of wars, seditions, captivity and death of princes, and destruction of cities, together with dryness and fiery meteors in the air, pestilence, and venomous snakes. Lastly, the star became like Saturn, and there will finally come a time of want, death, imprisonment and all sorts of sad things.
Science quotes on:  |  Tycho Brahe (19)  |  Jupiter (12)  |  Mars (14)  |  Observation (264)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Saturn (8)  |  Star (132)  |  Supernova (6)  |  Venus (8)

The technologies which have had the most profound effects on human life are usually simple. A good example of a simple technology with profound historical consequences is hay. ... It was hay that allowed populations to grow and civilizations to flourish among the forests of Northern Europe. Hay moved the greatness of Rome to Paris and London, and later to Berlin and Moscow and New York.
[The year-round growth of green grass in the Mediterranean climate meant that hay was not needed by the Romans. North of the Alps, hay maintained horses and oxen and thus their motive power, and productivity.]
'Quick is Beautiful'. Infinite in All Directions: Gifford Lectures Given at Aberdeen, Scotland (1988, 2004), 135.
Science quotes on:  |  Berlin (3)  |  Civilisation (6)  |  Europe (16)  |  Flourish (6)  |  Forest (54)  |  Grass (10)  |  Greatness (24)  |  Growth (70)  |  Horse (17)  |  London (4)  |  Moscow (2)  |  New York (5)  |  Oxen (2)  |  Paris (4)  |  Population (41)  |  Profound (23)  |  Roman (4)  |  Rome (4)  |  Simple (25)  |  Technology (98)

The universe, that vast assemblage of every thing that exists, presents only matter and motion: the whole offers to our contemplation, nothing but an immense, an uninterrupted succession of causes and effects.
The System of Nature (1770), trans. Samuel Wilkinson (1820), Vol. 1, 12-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (122)  |  Matter (135)  |  Motion (64)  |  Universe (291)

The world is not as it was when it came from its Maker’s hands. It has been modified by many great revolutions, brought about by an inner mechanism of which we very imperfectly comprehend the movements; but of which we gain a glimpse by studying their effects: and their many causes still acting on the surface of our globe with undiminished power, which are changing, and will continue to change it, as long as it shall last.
Letter 1 to William Wordsworth. Quoted in the appendix to W. Wordsworth, A Complete Guide to the Lakes, Comprising Minute Direction for the Tourist, with Mr Wordsworth's Description of the Scenery of the County and Three Letters upon the Geology of the Lake District (1841), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (57)  |  Cause (122)  |  Change (133)  |  Comprehension (30)  |  Globe (20)  |  Great (62)  |  Imperfection (11)  |  Inner (9)  |  Maker (4)  |  Mechanism (25)  |  Modification (22)  |  Movement (31)  |  Power (103)  |  Revolution (34)  |  Study (157)  |  Surface (37)  |  World (231)

There are various causes for the generation of force: a tensed spring, an air current, a falling mass of water, fire burning under a boiler, a metal that dissolves in an acid—one and the same effect can be produced by means of all these various causes. But in the animal body we recognise only one cause as the ultimate cause of all generation of force, and that is the reciprocal interaction exerted on one another by the constituents of the food and the oxygen of the air. The only known and ultimate cause of the vital activity in the animal as well as in the plant is a chemical process.
'Der Lebensprocess im Thiere und die Atmosphare', Annalen der Chemie und Pharmacie (1841), 41, 215-7. Trans. Kenneth L. Caneva, Robert Mo.yer and the Conservation of Energy (1993), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (14)  |  Activity (48)  |  Air (84)  |  Animal (143)  |  Boiler (4)  |  Cause (122)  |  Chemical (38)  |  Dissolve (5)  |  Fire (59)  |  Food (77)  |  Force (75)  |  Interaction (11)  |  Metal (19)  |  Oxygen (34)  |  Plant (96)  |  Process (97)  |  Reaction (48)  |  Spring (17)  |  Steam (15)  |  Tension (4)  |  Water (122)  |  Wind (28)

Therefore to the same natural effects we must, as far as possible, assign the same causes.
From Isaac Newton, Rules of Reasoning in Philosophy, Rule 2, as translated by Andrew Motte in The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1803), Vol. 2, 160.
Science quotes on:  |  Assign (2)  |  Cause (122)  |  Natural (48)  |  Possible (19)  |  Same (15)

Therefore, the causes assigned to natural effects of the same kind must be, so far as possible, the same.
The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1687), 3rd edition (1726), trans. I. B. Cohen and Anne Whitman (1999), Book 3, Rule. of Reasoning in Philosophy, Rule 2, 795.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (122)  |  Equality (7)

This example illustrates the differences in the effects which may be produced by research in pure or applied science. A research on the lines of applied science would doubtless have led to improvement and development of the older methods—the research in pure science has given us an entirely new and much more powerful method. In fact, research in applied science leads to reforms, research in pure science leads to revolutions, and revolutions, whether political or industrial, are exceedingly profitable things if you are on the winning side.
In Lord Rayleigh, The Life of Sir J. J. Thomson (1943), 199
Science quotes on:  |  Applied Science (16)  |  Development (122)  |  Difference (135)  |  Improvement (36)  |  Method (73)  |  Profit (14)  |  Pure Science (7)  |  Reform (6)  |  Research (360)  |  Revolution (34)  |  Win (8)

Tis evident that all reasonings concerning matter of fact are founded on the relation of cause and effect, and that we can never infer the existence of one object from another, unless they be connected together, either mediately or immediately... Here is a billiard ball lying on the table, and another ball moving toward it with rapidity. They strike; and the ball which was formerly at rest now acquires a motion. This is as perfect an instance of the relation of cause and effect as any which we know, either by sensation or reflection.
An Abstract of A Treatise on Human Nature (1740), ed. John Maynard Keynes and Piero Sraffa (1938), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (122)  |  Collision (6)  |  Existence (150)  |  Motion (64)  |  Reason (173)  |  Reflection (26)  |  Sensation (6)

To consider the matter aright, reason is nothing but a wonderful and unintelligible instinct in our souls, which carries us along a certain train of ideas, and endows them with particular qualities, according to their particular situations and relations. This instinct, 'tis true, arises from past observation and experience; but can anyone give the ultimate reason, why past experience and observation produces such an effect, any more than why nature alone should produce it?
A Treatise on Human Nature (1739-40), ed. L. A. Selby-Bigge (1888), book 1, part 3, section 16, 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Nature (534)  |  Observation (264)  |  Reason (173)

We are not to suppose, that there is any violent exertion of power, such as is required in order to produce a great event in little time; in nature, we find no deficiency in respect of time, nor any limitation with regard to power. But time is not made to flow in vain; nor does there ever appear the exertion of superfluous power, or the manifestation of design, not calculated in wisdom to effect some general end.
'Theory of the Earth', Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 1788, 1, 294.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (250)  |  Geology (145)  |  Nature (534)  |  Origin Of Earth (6)  |  Power (103)  |  Time (170)  |  Wisdom (91)

We find that one of the most rewarding features of being scientists these days ... is the common bond which the search for truth provides to scholars of many tongues and many heritages. In the long run, that spirit will inevitably have a constructive effect on the benefits which man can derive from knowledge of himself and his environment.
Nobel Prize Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (21)  |  Bond (11)  |  Common (44)  |  Environment (75)  |  Feature (14)  |  Heritage (5)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Language (71)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Provide (13)  |  Reward (21)  |  Scholar (19)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Search (40)  |  Spirit (52)  |  Truth (450)

We have no other notion of cause and effect, but that of certain objects, which have always conjoin'd together, and which in all past instances have been found inseparable. We cannot penetrate into the reason of the conjunction. We only observe the thing itself, and always find that from the constant conjunction the objects acquire an union in the imagination.
A Treatise on Human Nature (1739-40), ed. L. A. Selby-Bigge (1888), book 1, part 3, section 6, 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (122)

We have seen that a proton of energy corresponding to 30,000 volts can effect the transformation of lithium into two fast α-particles, which together have an energy equivalent of more than 16 million volts. Considering the individual process, the output of energy in the transmutation is more than 500 times greater than the energy carried by the proton. There is thus a great gain of energy in the single transmutation, but we must not forget that on an average more than 1000 million protons of equal energy must be fired into the lithium before one happens to hit and enter the lithium nucleus. It is clear in this case that on the whole the energy derived from transmutation of the atom is small compared with the energy of the bombarding particles. There thus seems to be little prospect that we can hope to obtain a new source of power by these processes. It has sometimes been' suggested, from analogy with ordinary explosives, that the transmutation of one atom might cause the transmutation of a neighbouring nucleus, so that the explosion would spread throughout all the material. If this were true, we should long ago have had a gigantic explosion in our laboratories with no one remaining to tell the tale. The absence of these accidents indicates, as we should expect, that the explosion is confined to the individual nucleus and does not spread to the neighbouring nuclei, which may be regarded as relatively far removed from the centre of the explosion.
The Transmutation of the Atom (1933), 23-4
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (5)  |  Accident (25)  |  Alpha Particle (2)  |  Analogy (26)  |  Atom (164)  |  Atomic Bomb (71)  |  Average (16)  |  Bombardment (2)  |  Centre (13)  |  Confinement (3)  |  Energy (103)  |  Explosion (10)  |  Explosive (7)  |  Forget (10)  |  Gigantic (6)  |  Indication (15)  |  Individual (59)  |  Laboratory (75)  |  Lithium (3)  |  Million (29)  |  Neighbor (4)  |  Nucleus (21)  |  Output (5)  |  Power (103)  |  Process (97)  |  Prospect (8)  |  Proton (7)  |  Source (33)  |  Spread (7)  |  Suggestion (13)  |  Transformation (27)  |  Transmutation (10)

We have usually no knowledge that any one factor will exert its effects independently of all others that can be varied, or that its effects are particularly simply related to variations in these other factors.
The Design of Experiments (6th Ed., 1951), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Design (37)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Factor (15)  |  Independent (16)  |  Relation (35)  |  Variation (34)

We must also teach science not as the bare body of fact, but more as human endeavor in its historic context—in the context of the effects of scientific thought on every kind of thought. We must teach it as an intellectual pursuit rather than as a body of tricks.
In Kermit Lansner, Second-Rate Brains: A Factual, Perceptive Report by Top Scientists, Educators, Journalists, and Their Urgent Recommendations (1958), 31. Note: Dr. I.I. Rabi was chairman of President Eisenhower's Science Advisory Committee.
Science quotes on:  |  Bare (4)  |  Body (88)  |  Context (7)  |  Endeavour (23)  |  Fact (325)  |  History (156)  |  Human (168)  |  Intellect (99)  |  Pursuit (34)  |  Science (875)  |  Teaching (64)  |  Thought (170)  |  Trick (11)

We need only reflect on what has been prov'd at large, that we are never sensible of any connexion betwixt causes and effects, and that 'tis only by our experience of their constant conjunction, we can arrive at any knowledge of this relation.
A Treatise on Human Nature (1739-40), ed. L. A. Selby-Bigge (1888), book 1, part 4, section 165, 247.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (122)  |  Connection (39)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Proof (136)  |  Relationship (37)

Wonder [admiratio astonishment, marvel] is a kind of desire for knowledge. The situation arises when one sees an effect and does not know its cause, or when the cause of the particular effect is one that exceeds his power of understanding. Hence, wonder is a cause of pleasure insofar as there is annexed the hope of attaining understanding of that which one wants to know. ... For desire is especially aroused by the awareness of ignorance, and consequently a man takes the greatest pleasure in those things which he discovers for himself or learns from the ground up.
From Summa Theologiae Question 32, 'The Causes of Pleasure,' Article 8, 'Is Pleasure Caused by Wondering.'(1a2ae 32.8). As translated in James Vincent Cunningham, Tragic Effect and Tragic Process in Some Plays of Shakespeare (1945). Also in The Collected Essays of J.V. Cunningham (1976), 72-73.
Science quotes on:  |  Arouse (4)  |  Astonishment (14)  |  Attainment (23)  |  Awareness (14)  |  Cause (122)  |  Desire (46)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Greatest (23)  |  Hope (50)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Kind (27)  |  Know (25)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Learn (23)  |  Marvel (16)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Want (32)  |  Wonder (64)

[Describing a freshman seminar titled “How the Tabby Cat Got Her Stripes or The Silence of the Genes”:] The big idea we start with is: “How is the genome interpreted, and how are stable decisions that affect gene expression inherited from one cell to the next? This is one of the most competitive areas of molecular biology at the moment, and the students are reading papers that in some instances were published this past year. As a consequence, one of the most common answers I have to give to their questions is, “We just don't know.”
As quoted by Kitta MacPherson in 'Exploring Epigenetics: President Shirley Tilghman in the Classroom,' Princeton University Undergraduate Admission web page accessed 14 Oct 2013.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (96)  |  Cell (90)  |  Decision (30)  |  Expression (44)  |  Genome (3)  |  Inherit (2)  |  Interpretation (38)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Molecular Biology (19)  |  Publication (75)  |  Question (159)  |  Recent (14)  |  Stable (5)

[There] are cases where there is no dishonesty involved but where people are tricked into false results by a lack of understanding about what human beings can do to themselves in the way of being led astray by subjective effects, wishful thinking or threshold interactions. These are examples of pathological science. These are things that attracted a great deal of attention. Usually hundreds of papers have been published upon them. Sometimes they have lasted for fifteen or twenty years and then they gradually die away.
[Coining the term “pathological science” for the self-deceiving application of science to a phenomenon that doesn't exist.]
From a Colloquium at The Knolls Research Laboratory (18 Dec 1953). Transcribed and edited by R. N. Hall. In General Electric Laboratories, Report No. 68-C-035 (April 1968).
Science quotes on:  |  Dishonesty (5)  |  False (29)  |  Lack (14)  |  Research (360)  |  Result (129)  |  Self-Deception (2)  |  Subjective (4)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Trick (11)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Wishful (2)

[The] complex pattern of the misallocation of credit for scientific work must quite evidently be described as “the Matthew effect,” for, as will be remembered, the Gospel According to St. Matthew puts it this way: For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have abundance: but from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he hath. Put in less stately language, the Matthew effect consists of the accruing of greater increments of recognition for particular scientific contributions to scientists of considerable repute and the withholding of such recognition from scientists who have not yet made their mark.
'The Matthew Effect in Science', Science (1968), 159, 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (10)  |  Complexity (51)  |  Contribution (23)  |  Credit (10)  |  Description (40)  |  Give (8)  |  Gospel (3)  |  Hath (2)  |  Increment (2)  |  Language (71)  |  Mark (14)  |  Pattern (18)  |  Recognition (38)  |  Scientific (55)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Stately (4)  |  Work (198)

[The] erroneous assumption is to the effect that the aim of public education is to fill the young of the species with knowledge and awaken their intelligence, and so make them fit to discharge the duties of citizenship in an enlightened and independent manner. Nothing could be further from the truth. The aim of public education is not to spread enlightenment at all; it is simply to reduce as many individuals as possible to the same safe level, to breed and train a standardised citizenry, to put down dissent and originality.
The American Mercury (24 Apr 1924).
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (21)  |  Assumption (27)  |  Citizenship (4)  |  Dissent (5)  |  Education (177)  |  Enlightenment (7)  |  Error (152)  |  Independence (19)  |  Individual (59)  |  Intelligence (76)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Originality (7)  |  Public (35)  |  Reduction (22)  |  Safety (22)  |  Standardization (2)  |  Truth (450)  |  Young (20)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton