Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Change

Change Quotes (129 quotes)

'Conservation' (the conservation law) means this ... that there is a number, which you can calculate, at one moment—and as nature undergoes its multitude of changes, this number doesn't change. That is, if you calculate again, this quantity, it'll be the same as it was before. An example is the conservation of energy: there's a quantity that you can calculate according to a certain rule, and it comes out the same answer after, no matter what happens, happens.
'The Great Conservation Principles', The Messenger Series of Lectures, No. 3, Cornell University, 1964. From transcript of BBC programme (11 Dec 1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Calculation (38)  |  Conservation (40)  |  Energy (101)  |  Law (269)  |  Nature (524)  |  Number (88)

“I'm not so sure he's wrong about automobiles,” he said, “With all their speed forward they may be a step backward for civilization—that is, spiritual civilization ... But automobiles have come, and they bring a greater change in our life than most of us expect. They are here, and almost all outward things are going to be different because of what they bring. They are going to alter war, and they are going to alter peace.”
Spoken by character Eugene, in the novel, The Magnificent Ambersons (1918), 275
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (16)  |  Automobile (9)  |  Civilization (84)  |  Expectation (24)  |  Forward (7)  |  Speed (10)  |  Spiritual (11)  |  War (74)

... on these expanded membranes [butterfly wings] Nature writes, as on a tablet, the story of the modifications of species, so truly do all changes of the organisation register themselves thereon. Moreover, the same colour-patterns of the wings generally show, with great regularity, the degrees of blood-relationship of the species. As the laws of nature must be the same for all beings, the conclusions furnished by this group of insects must be applicable to the whole world.
The Naturalist on the River Amazons: A record of Adventures, Habits of Animals, Sketches of Brazilian and Indian life, and Aspects of Nature under the Equator, During Eleven Years of Travel (1864), 413.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (68)  |  Being (34)  |  Blood (61)  |  Butterfly (8)  |  Colour (31)  |  Conclusion (73)  |  Degree (18)  |  Furnishing (3)  |  Group (24)  |  Insect (38)  |  Law Of Nature (29)  |  Membrane (6)  |  Modification (21)  |  Natural Selection (54)  |  Nature (524)  |  Organization (49)  |  Pattern (17)  |  Registration (2)  |  Regularity (11)  |  Relationship (35)  |  Sameness (2)  |  Species (91)  |  Story (16)  |  Tablet (2)  |  Wing (15)  |  World (206)  |  Writing (45)

Bei solchen chemischen Untersuchungen, die man zersetzende oder zergliedernde nennt, kommt es zunächst darauf an, zu ermitteln, mit welchen Stoffen man es zu thun hat, oder um chemisch zu reden, welche Stoffe in einem bestimmten Gemenge oder Gemisch enthalten sind. Hierzu bedient man sich sogenannter gegenwirkender Mittel, d. h. Stoffe, die bestimmte Eigenschaften und Eigenthümlichkeiten besitzen und die man aus Ueberlieferung oder eigner Erfahrung genau kennt, so daß die Veränderungen, welche sie bewirken oder erleiden, gleichsam die Sprache sind, mit der sie reden und dadurch dem Forscher anzeigen, daß der und der bestimmte Stoff in der fraglichen Mischung enthalten sei.
In the case of chemical investigations known as decompositions or analyses, it is first important to determine exactly what ingredients you are dealing with, or chemically speaking, what substances are contained in a given mixture or composite. For this purpose we use reagents, i.e., substances that possess certain properties and characteristics, which we well know from references or personal experience, such that the changes which they bring about or undergo, so to say the language that they speak thereby inform the researcher that this or that specific substance is present in the mixture in question.
From Zur Farben-Chemie Musterbilder für Freunde des Schönen und zum Gebrauch für Zeichner, Maler, Verzierer und Zeugdrucker [On Colour Chemistry...] (1850), Introduction. Translation tweaked by Webmaster from version in Herbert and W. Roesky and Klaud Möckel, translated from the original German by T.N. Mitchell and W.E. Russey, Chemical Curiosities: Spectacular Experiments and Inspired Quotes (1996), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (78)  |  Characteristic (35)  |  Chemical (36)  |  Contain (5)  |  Decomposition (11)  |  Determination (32)  |  Exactly (3)  |  Experience (128)  |  Inform (3)  |  Ingredient (6)  |  Investigation (81)  |  Know (24)  |  Language (67)  |  Mixture (11)  |  Personal (14)  |  Present (32)  |  Property (46)  |  Question (152)  |  Reagent (3)  |  Reference (6)  |  Researcher (9)  |  Speak (13)  |  Specific (8)  |  Substance (37)  |  Undergo (4)

“Pieces” almost always appear 'as parts' in whole processes. ... To sever a “'part” from the organized whole in which it occurs—whether it itself be a subsidiary whole or an “element”—is a very real process usually involving alterations in that “part”. Modifications of a part frequently involve changes elsewhere in the whole itself. Nor is the nature of these alterations arbitrary, for they too are determined by whole-conditions.
From 'Untersuchungen zur Lehre von der Gestalt, I', Psychol. Forsch. (1922), 1, 47-58. As translated in 'The General Theoretical Situation' (1922), collected in W. D. Ellis (ed.), A Source Book of Gestalt Psychology (1938, 1967), Vol. 2, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (16)  |  Appear (7)  |  Arbitrary (6)  |  Determine (15)  |  Element (68)  |  Frequently (7)  |  Involve (5)  |  Modification (21)  |  Nature (524)  |  Organized (2)  |  Part (55)  |  Piece (12)  |  Process (97)  |  Real (27)  |  Subsidiary (2)  |  Whole (46)

A scientist is a man who changes his beliefs according to reality; a theist is a man who changes reality to match his beliefs.
In Dave Lane, Isn't Religion Weird? Quotations for Atheists (2008), 10, with no citation. If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster, who has meanwhile only tentatively assumed that the quote comes from Volker Braun the German playwright (but has confirmed it is not from Volker Braun the physicist).
Science quotes on:  |  According (7)  |  Belief (135)  |  Match (7)  |  Reality (62)  |  Scientist (224)

All interpretations made by a scientist are hypotheses, and all hypotheses are tentative. They must forever be tested and they must be revised if found to be unsatisfactory. Hence, a change of mind in a scientist, and particularly in a great scientist, is not only not a sign of weakness but rather evidence for continuing attention to the respective problem and an ability to test the hypothesis again and again.
The Growth of Biological Thought: Diversity, Evolution and Inheritance (1982), 831.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (38)  |  Attention (35)  |  Evidence (80)  |  Forever (13)  |  Hypothesis (147)  |  Interpretation (36)  |  Mind (266)  |  Problem (178)  |  Repetition (18)  |  Revise (3)  |  Scientist (224)  |  Sign (17)  |  Tentative (4)  |  Test (44)  |  Thinking (163)  |  Unsatisfactory (2)  |  Weakness (14)

All scientific theories are provisional and may be changed, but ... on the whole, they are accepted from Washington to Moscow because of their practical success. Where religion has opposed the findings of science, it has almost always had to retreat.
Essay 'Science Will Never Give Us the Answers to All Our Questions', collected in Henry Margenau, and Roy Abraham Varghese (eds.), Cosmos, Bios, Theos (1992), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Accepted (2)  |  Moscow (2)  |  Practical (30)  |  Provisional (2)  |  Religion (116)  |  Retreat (2)  |  Science (850)  |  Science And Religion (153)  |  Scientific (54)  |  Success (110)  |  Theory (346)  |  Washington (2)

Almost always the men who achieve these fundamental inventions of a new paradigm have been either very young or very new to the field whose paradigm they change.
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), 89-90.
Science quotes on:  |  Invention (167)  |  Paradigm (10)  |  Youth (31)

Amid all the revolutions of the globe, the economy of Nature has been uniform, ... and her laws are the only things that have resisted the general movement. The rivers and the rocks, the seas and the continents, have been changed in all their parts; but the laws which direct those changes, and the rules to which they are subject, have remained invariably the same.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802) collected in The Works of John Playfair (1822), Vol. 1, 415
Science quotes on:  |  Continent (22)  |  Invariance (2)  |  Law (269)  |  Nature (524)  |  River (32)  |  Rock (53)  |  Sea (56)

And by the influence of heat, light, and electrical powers, there is a constant series of changes [in animal and vegetal substances]; matter assumes new forms, the destruction of one order of beings tends to the conservation of another, solution and consolidation, decay and renovation, are connected, and whilst the parts of the system, continue in a state of fluctuation and change, the order and harmony of the whole remain unalterable.
The Elements of Agricultural Chemistry (1813), in J. Davy (ed.) The Collected Works of Sir Humphry Davy(1839-40), Vol 7, 182.
Science quotes on:  |  Electricity (81)  |  Heat (48)  |  Light (112)  |  Matter (131)  |  Reaction (47)

Animals, even plants, lie to each other all the time, and we could restrict the research to them, putting off the real truth about ourselves for the several centuries we need to catch our breath. What is it that enables certain flowers to resemble nubile insects, or opossums to play dead, or female fireflies to change the code of their flashes in order to attract, and then eat, males of a different species?
In Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony(1984), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (138)  |  Attraction (19)  |  Breath (15)  |  Century (37)  |  Code (8)  |  Death (175)  |  Difference (129)  |  Eating (12)  |  Enabling (4)  |  Female (9)  |  Flash (8)  |  Flower (22)  |  Insect (38)  |  Lying (4)  |  Male (10)  |  Opossum (2)  |  Ourselves (6)  |  Plant (93)  |  Reality (62)  |  Research (358)  |  Restriction (3)  |  Species (91)  |  Truth (440)

As geologists, we learn that it is not only the present condition of the globe that has been suited to the accommodation of myriads of living creatures, but that many former states also have been equally adapted to the organization and habits of prior races of beings. The disposition of the seas, continents, and islands, and the climates have varied; so it appears that the species have been changed, and yet they have all been so modelled, on types analogous to those of existing plants and animals, as to indicate throughout a perfect harmony of design and unity of purpose. To assume that the evidence of the beginning or end of so vast a scheme lies within the reach of our philosophical inquiries, or even of our speculations, appears to us inconsistent with a just estimate of the relations which subsist between the finite powers of man and the attributes of an Infinite and Eternal Being.
Principles of Geology(1830-3), Vol. 3, 384-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Climate (24)  |  Geologist (26)

As the world of science has grown in size and in power, its deepest problems have changed from the epistemological to the social.
Scientific Knowledge and its Social Problems (1971), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Epistemology (4)  |  Power (98)  |  Problem (178)  |  Science (850)  |  Size (18)  |  Society (81)  |  World (206)

Biology is a science of three dimensions. The first is the study of each species across all levels of biological organization, molecule to cell to organism to population to ecosystem. The second dimension is the diversity of all species in the biosphere. The third dimension is the history of each species in turn, comprising both its genetic evolution and the environmental change that drove the evolution. Biology, by growing in all three dimensions, is progressing toward unification and will continue to do so.
In 'Systematics and the Future of Biology', Systematics and the Origin of Species: on Ernst Mayr's 100th anniversary, Volume 102, Issues 22-26 (2005), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (82)  |  Biosphere (7)  |  Cell (83)  |  Dimension (12)  |  Diversity (32)  |  Ecosystem (8)  |  Environment (70)  |  Evolution (332)  |  Genetics (78)  |  Growth (65)  |  Molecule (80)  |  Organism (66)  |  Organization (49)  |  Population (41)  |  Progress (198)  |  Species (91)  |  Study (149)  |  Unification (5)

Birds ... are sensitive indicators of the environment, a sort of “ecological litmus paper,” ... The observation and recording of bird populations over time lead inevitably to environmental awareness and can signal impending changes.
In Peterson Field Guide to Birds of North America (2008), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Awareness (11)  |  Bird (54)  |  Ecology (20)  |  Environment (70)  |  Impending (2)  |  Indicator (4)  |  Observation (256)  |  Paper (25)  |  Population (41)  |  Recording (4)  |  Sensitive (5)  |  Signal (5)  |  Sort (7)

But I should be very sorry if an interpretation founded on a most conjectural scientific hypothesis were to get fastened to the text in Genesis... The rate of change of scientific hypothesis is naturally much more rapid than that of Biblical interpretations, so that if an interpretation is founded on such an hypothesis, it may help to keep the hypothesis above ground long after it ought to be buried and forgotten.
Letter to Rev. C. J. Ellicott, Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol (22 Nov 1876). Quoted in Lewis Campbell and William Garnett, The Life of James Clerk Maxwell (1882), 394.
Science quotes on:  |  Bible (42)  |  Bury (2)  |  Conjecture (15)  |  Forget (9)  |  Found (7)  |  Genesis (10)  |  Hypothesis (147)  |  Interpretation (36)  |  Sorry (4)

But I think that in the repeated and almost entire changes of organic types in the successive formations of the earth—in the absence of mammalia in the older, and their very rare appearance (and then in forms entirely. unknown to us) in the newer secondary groups—in the diffusion of warm-blooded quadrupeds (frequently of unknown genera) through the older tertiary systems—in their great abundance (and frequently of known genera) in the upper portions of the same series—and, lastly, in the recent appearance of man on the surface of the earth (now universally admitted—in one word, from all these facts combined, we have a series of proofs the most emphatic and convincing,—that the existing order of nature is not the last of an uninterrupted succession of mere physical events derived from laws now in daily operation: but on the contrary, that the approach to the present system of things has been gradual, and that there has been a progressive development of organic structure subservient to the purposes of life.
'Address to the Geological Society, delivered on the Evening of the 18th of February 1831', Proceedings of the Geological Society (1834), 1, 305-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (4)  |  Abundance (9)  |  Appearance (45)  |  Combination (36)  |  Convincing (6)  |  Development (117)  |  Earth (238)  |  Emphasis (9)  |  Formation (32)  |  Genus (13)  |  Gradual (9)  |  Law (269)  |  Life (439)  |  Mammal (16)  |  Nature (524)  |  Organic (18)  |  Progression (8)  |  Proof (133)  |  Purpose (62)  |  Quadruped (3)  |  Repeat (10)  |  Secondary (6)  |  Structure (101)  |  Subservience (3)  |  Succession (29)  |  Tertiary (2)  |  Unknown (39)

But science is the great instrument of social change, all the greater because its object is not change but knowledge, and its silent appropriation of this dominant function, amid the din of political and religious strife, is the most vital of all the revolutions which have marked the development of modern civilisation.
Decadence: Henry Sidgwick Memorial Lecture (1908), 55-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (84)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Science (850)

Chemistry is one of those branches of human knowledge which has built itself upon methods and instruments by which truth can presumably be determined. It has survived and grown because all its precepts and principles can be re-tested at any time and anywhere. So long as it remained the mysterious alchemy by which a few devotees, by devious and dubious means, presumed to change baser metals into gold, it did not flourish, but when it dealt with the fact that 56 g. of fine iron, when heated with 32 g. of flowers of sulfur, generated extra heat and gave exactly 88 g. of an entirely new substance, then additional steps could be taken by anyone. Scientific research in chemistry, since the birth of the balance and the thermometer, has been a steady growth of test and observation. It has disclosed a finite number of elementary reagents composing an infinite universe, and it is devoted to their inter-reaction for the benefit of mankind.
Address upon receiving the Perkin Medal Award, 'The Big Things in Chemistry', The Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (Feb 1921), 13, No. 2, 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (17)  |  Balance (23)  |  Base (10)  |  Branch (23)  |  Building (32)  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Determination (32)  |  Devotee (2)  |  Element (68)  |  Fact (311)  |  Flourishing (3)  |  Gold (20)  |  Heat (48)  |  Human (155)  |  Instrument (37)  |  Iron (32)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Means (25)  |  Metal (19)  |  Method (73)  |  Mystery (71)  |  Observation (256)  |  Precept (3)  |  Presumption (5)  |  Principle (96)  |  Research (358)  |  Stoichiometry (2)  |  Sulphur (9)  |  Survival (30)  |  Test (44)  |  Thermometer (2)  |  Truth (440)

Even in Europe a change has sensibly taken place in the mind of man. Science has liberated the ideas of those who read and reflect, and the American example has kindled feelings of right in the people. An insurrection has consequently begun of science talents and courage against rank and birth, which have fallen into contempt. It has failed in its first effort, because the mobs of the cities, the instrument used for its accomplishment, debased by ignorance, poverty and vice, could not be restrained to rational action. But the world will soon recover from the panic of this first catastrophe.
Letter to John Adams (Monticello, 1813). In Thomas Jefferson and John P. Foley (ed.), The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia (1900), 49. From Paul Leicester Ford (ed.), The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1892-99). Vol 4, 439.
Science quotes on:  |  America (39)  |  Idea (220)  |  Revolution (33)  |  Science (850)

Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.
The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1687), 3rd edition (1726), trans. I. B. Cohen and Anne Whitman (1999), Axioms, or Laws of Motion, Law 1, 416.
Science quotes on:  |  Force (72)  |  Law Of Motion (7)

Every creature has its own food, and an appropriate alchemist with the task of dividing it ... The alchemist takes the food and changes it into a tincture which he sends through the body to become blood and flesh. This alchemist dwells in the stomach where he cooks and works. The man eats a piece of meat, in which is both bad and good. When the meat reaches the stomach, there is the alchemist who divides it. What does not belong to health he casts away to a special place, and sends the good wherever it is needed. That is the Creator's decree... That is the virtue and power of the alchemist in man.
Volumen Medicinae Paramirum (c. 1520), in Paracelsus: Essential Readings, edited by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke (1990), 50-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemist (5)  |  Blood (61)  |  Body (88)  |  Cast (9)  |  Cook (7)  |  Creator (15)  |  Creature (45)  |  Decree (2)  |  Digestion (15)  |  Division (15)  |  Excretion (3)  |  Flesh (9)  |  Food (73)  |  Health (92)  |  Power (98)  |  Stomach (11)  |  Tincture (2)  |  Virtue (27)

Faced with the choice between changing one's mind and proving that there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy with the proof.
A Contemporary Guide to Economics, Peace, and Laughter (1971), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Proof (133)

First follow Nature, and your judgment frame
By her just standard, which is still the same:
Unerring nature, still divinely bright,
One clear, unchanged, and universal light,
Life, force, and beauty must to all impart,
At once the source, and end, and test of art.
#039;Essay On Criticism#039;, Miscellaneous Poems and Translations: by Several Hands (1720), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (76)  |  Beauty (83)  |  Bright (8)  |  Clear (9)  |  End (48)  |  Follow (20)  |  Force (72)  |  Frame (9)  |  Impart (2)  |  Judgment (38)  |  Life (439)  |  Light (112)  |  Nature (524)  |  Source (32)  |  Standard (15)  |  Test (44)  |  Universal (25)

For a stone, when it is examined, will be found a mountain in miniature. The fineness of Nature's work is so great, that, into a single block, a foot or two in diameter, she can compress as many changes of form and structure, on a small scale, as she needs for her mountains on a large one; and, taking moss for forests, and grains of crystal for crags, the surface of a stone, in by far the plurality of instances, is more interesting than the surface of an ordinary hill; more fantastic in form and incomparably richer in colour—the last quality being, in fact, so noble in most stones of good birth (that is to say, fallen from the crystalline mountain ranges).
Modem Painters, 4, Containing part 5 of Mountain Beauty (1860), 311.
Science quotes on:  |  Block (5)  |  Colour (31)  |  Compression (2)  |  Crag (3)  |  Crystal (21)  |  Crystal (21)  |  Fantastic (4)  |  Forest (53)  |  Form (65)  |  Grain (10)  |  Hill (14)  |  Instance (7)  |  Interest (75)  |  Large (22)  |  Miniature (2)  |  Moss (5)  |  Mountain (62)  |  Nature (524)  |  Noble (14)  |  Ordinary (18)  |  Plurality (4)  |  Quality (27)  |  Range (12)  |  Richness (8)  |  Scale (20)  |  Small (31)  |  Stone (19)  |  Structure (101)  |  Surface (35)

Forward, forward let us range,
Let the great world spin for ever down the ringing grooves of change.
'Locksley Hall' (1842), collected in Alfred Tennyson and William James Rolfe (ed.) The Poetic and Dramatic Works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1898), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Down (11)  |  Forward (7)  |  Great (58)  |  Range (12)  |  Spin (2)  |  World (206)

Geologists have usually had recourse for the explanation of these changes to the supposition of sundry violent and extraordinary catastrophes, cataclysms, or general revolutions having occurred in the physical state of the earth's surface.
As the idea imparted by the term Cataclysm, Catastrophe, or Revolution, is extremely vague, and may comprehend any thing you choose to imagine, it answers for the time very well as an explanation; that is, it stops further inquiry. But it also has had the disadvantage of effectually stopping the advance of science, by involving it in obscurity and confusion.
Considerations on Volcanoes (1825), iv.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (26)  |  Answer (91)  |  Catastrophe (8)  |  Comprehension (29)  |  Confusion (17)  |  Disadvantage (5)  |  Earth (238)  |  Explanation (84)  |  Geologist (26)  |  Imagination (125)  |  Impart (2)  |  Inquiry (12)  |  Obscurity (9)  |  Recourse (3)  |  Revolution (33)  |  Science (850)  |  State (42)  |  Stop (23)  |  Sundry (2)  |  Supposition (25)  |  Surface (35)  |  Term (34)  |  Vagueness (8)  |  Violence (3)

How much has happened in these fifty years—a period more remarkable than any, I will venture to say, in the annals of mankind. I am not thinking of the rise and fall of Empires, the change of dynasties, the establishment of Governments. I am thinking of those revolutions of science which have had much more effect than any political causes, which have changed the position and prospects of mankind more than all the conquests and all the codes and all the legislators that ever lived.
Banquet speech, Glasgow. In Nature (27 Nov 1873), 9, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Annal (2)  |  Cause (116)  |  Code (8)  |  Conquest (6)  |  Dynasty (4)  |  Effect (70)  |  Empire (6)  |  Establishment (18)  |  Fall (30)  |  Government (48)  |  Mankind (105)  |  Politics (50)  |  Position (18)  |  Prospect (8)  |  Revolution (33)  |  Rise (12)  |  Science (850)  |  Thinking (163)

However, the small probability of a similar encounter [of the earth with a comet], can become very great in adding up over a huge sequence of centuries. It is easy to picture to oneself the effects of this impact upon the Earth. The axis and the motion of rotation changed; the seas abandoning their old position to throw themselves toward the new equator; a large part of men and animals drowned in this universal deluge, or destroyed by the violent tremor imparted to the terrestrial globe.
Exposition du Système du Monde, 2nd edition (1799), 208, trans. Ivor Grattan-Guinness.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (138)  |  Axis (4)  |  Century (37)  |  Comet (20)  |  Deluge (5)  |  Destroy (15)  |  Drown (3)  |  Earth (238)  |  Encounter (6)  |  Equator (3)  |  Globe (17)  |  Impact (9)  |  Man (258)  |  Probability (54)  |  Rotation (5)  |  Sea (56)  |  Sequence (15)

Humans are allergic to change. They love to say, “We've always done it this way.” I try to fight that. That's why I have a clock on my wall that runs counter-clockwise.
As quoted, without citation, by Kurt W. Beyer, 'Grace Murray Hopper', in Joseph J. Thomas, Leadership Embodied: The Secrets to Success of the Most Effective Navy and Marine Corps Leaders (2005), 160.
Science quotes on:  |  Allergy (2)  |  Clock (13)  |  Fight (7)  |  Human (155)  |  French Saying (51)

I am afraid all we can do is to accept the paradox and try to accommodate ourselves to it, as we have done to so many paradoxes lately in modern physical theories. We shall have to get accustomed to the idea that the change of the quantity R, commonly called the 'radius of the universe', and the evolutionary changes of stars and stellar systems are two different processes, going on side by side without any apparent connection between them. After all the 'universe' is an hypothesis, like the atom, and must be allowed the freedom to have properties and to do things which would be contradictory and impossible for a finite material structure.
Kosmos (1932), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (30)  |  Accommodation (4)  |  Accustom (4)  |  Afraid (7)  |  Apparent (9)  |  Atom (164)  |  Connection (39)  |  Contradiction (22)  |  Difference (129)  |  Evolution (332)  |  Finite (13)  |  Freedom (41)  |  Hypothesis (147)  |  Idea (220)  |  Impossibility (31)  |  Material (54)  |  Modern (42)  |  Paradox (22)  |  Physical (26)  |  Process (97)  |  Property (46)  |  Quantity (23)  |  Radius (3)  |  Star (124)  |  Structure (101)  |  System (67)  |  Theory (346)  |  Universe (274)  |  Universe (274)

I am afraid all we can do is to accept the paradox and try to accommodate ourselves to it, as we have done to so many paradoxes lately in modern physical theories. We shall have to get accustomed to the idea that the change of the quantity R, commonly called the 'radius of the universe', and the evolutionary changes of stars and stellar systems are two different processes, going on side by side without any apparent connection between them. After all the 'universe' is an hypothesis, like the atom, and must be allowed the freedom to have properties and to do things which would be contradictory and impossible for a finite material structure.
Kosmos (1932), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (30)  |  Accommodation (4)  |  Accustom (4)  |  Afraid (7)  |  Apparent (9)  |  Atom (164)  |  Connection (39)  |  Contradiction (22)  |  Difference (129)  |  Evolution (332)  |  Finite (13)  |  Freedom (41)  |  Hypothesis (147)  |  Idea (220)  |  Impossibility (31)  |  Material (54)  |  Modern (42)  |  Paradox (22)  |  Physical (26)  |  Process (97)  |  Property (46)  |  Quantity (23)  |  Radius (3)  |  Star (124)  |  Structure (101)  |  System (67)  |  Theory (346)  |  Universe (274)  |  Universe (274)

I am the daughter of earth and water, And the nursling of the sky;
I pass through the pores of the ocean and shores;
I change, but I cannot die.
For after the rain when with never a stain,
The pavilion of Heaven is bare,
And the winds and sunbeams with their convex gleams,
Build up the blue dome of air,
I silently laugh at my own cenotaph, And out of the caverns of rain,
Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb,
I arise and unbuild it again.
The Cloud (1820). In K. Raine (ed.), Shelley (1974), 289.
Science quotes on:  |  Bare (4)  |  Daughter (7)  |  Die (5)  |  Earth (238)  |  Heaven (53)  |  Ocean (54)  |  Pore (5)  |  Rain (17)  |  Shore (6)  |  Sky (31)  |  Stain (7)

I find in the domestic duck that the bones of the wing weigh less and the bones of the leg more, in proportion to the whole skeleton, than do the same bones in the wild duck; and this change may be safely attributed to the domestic duck flying much less, and walking more, than its wild parents.
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (12)  |  Bone (25)  |  Domestic (2)  |  Duck (2)  |  Find (46)  |  Fly (28)  |  Leg (4)  |  Parent (23)  |  Proportion (23)  |  Skeleton (9)  |  Walk (23)  |  Weight (40)  |  Whole (46)  |  Wild (11)  |  Wing (15)

I suspect that the changes that have taken place during the last century in the average man's fundamental beliefs, in his philosophy, in his concept of religion. in his whole world outlook, are greater than the changes that occurred during the preceding four thousand years all put together. ... because of science and its applications to human life, for these have bloomed in my time as no one in history had had ever dreamed could be possible.
In The Autobiography of Robert A. Millikan (1951, 1980), xii.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (68)  |  Average (16)  |  Belief (135)  |  Century (37)  |  Concept (36)  |  Dream (39)  |  Fundamental (56)  |  History (151)  |  Human Life (5)  |  Man (258)  |  Outlook (7)  |  Philosophy (128)  |  Possibility (67)  |  Preceding (4)  |  Religion (116)  |  Science (850)  |  Suspicion (14)  |  Thousand (29)  |  Time (160)  |  Year (61)

I take it that a monograph of this sort belongs to the ephemera literature of science. The studied care which is warranted in the treatment of the more slowly moving branches of science would be out of place here. Rather with the pen of a journalist we must attempt to record a momentary phase of current thought, which may at any instant change with kaleidoscopic abruptness.
Valence and the Structure of Atoms and Molecules (1923), Preface.
Science quotes on:  |  Kaleidoscope (2)  |  Publication (75)  |  Thinking (163)

I will now direct the attention of scientists to a previously unnoticed cause which brings about the metamorphosis and decomposition phenomena which are usually called decay, putrefaction, rotting, fermentation and moldering. This cause is the ability possessed by a body engaged in decomposition or combination, i.e. in chemical action, to give rise in a body in contact with it the same ability to undergo the same change which it experiences itself.
Annalen der Pharmacie 1839, 30, 262. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (38)  |  Ability (38)  |  Attention (35)  |  Cause (116)  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Combination (36)  |  Contact (12)  |  Decay (19)  |  Decomposition (11)  |  Decomposition (11)  |  Experience (128)  |  Fermentation (10)  |  Metamorphosis (3)  |  Mold (5)  |  Phenomenon (113)  |  Putrefaction (3)  |  Reaction (47)  |  Rotting (2)  |  Scientist (224)

If I make a decision it is a possession. I take pride in it, I tend to defend it and not listen to those who question it. If I make sense, then this is more dynamic, and I listen and I can change it. A decision is something you polish. Sensemaking is a direction for the next period.
Personal communication (13 Jun 1995). In Karl E. Weick, 'The Experience of Theorizing: Sensemaking as Topic and Resource'. Quoted in Ken G. Smith (ed.) and Michael A. Hitt (ed), Great Minds in Management: the Theory of Process Development (2005), 398. Weick writes that Gleason explains how leadership needs 'sensemaking rather than decision making.' As a highly skilled wildland firefighter he would make sense of an unfolding fire, giving directives that are open to revision at any time, so they can be self-correcting, responsive, with a transparent rationale. By contrast, decision making eats up valuable time with polishing the decision to get it 'right' and defending it, and also encourages blind spots.
Science quotes on:  |  Decision (30)  |  Defend (6)  |  Direction (25)  |  Dynamic (6)  |  Listen (4)  |  Polish (4)  |  Possession (24)  |  Pride (17)  |  Question (152)  |  Sense (100)

If the great story of the last century was the conflict among various political ideologies—communism, fascism and democracy—then the great narrative of this century will be the changes wrought by astonishing scientific breakthroughs
Atlanta Journal-Constitution, column also distributed by United Press Syndicate, American Know-How Hobbled by Know-Nothings (9 Aug 2005). In Eve Herold, George Daley, Stem Cell Wars (2007), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishment (14)  |  Breakthrough (9)  |  Century (37)  |  Communism (3)  |  Conflict (24)  |  Democracy (5)  |  Ideology (2)  |  Narrative (3)

If we lived on a planet where nothing ever changed, there would be little to do. There would be nothing to figure out. There would be no impetus for science. And if we lived in an unpredictable world, where things changed in random or very complex ways, we would not be able to figure things out. But we live in an in-between universe, where things change, but according to patterns, rules, or as we call them, laws of nature. If I throw a stick up in the air, it always falls down. If the sun sets in the west, it always rises again the next morning in the east. And so it becomes possible to figure things out. We can do science, and with it we can improve our lives.
Cosmos (1980, 1985), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (38)  |  Complexity (49)  |  Doing (25)  |  Down (11)  |  East (2)  |  Fall (30)  |  Improvement (35)  |  Law Of Nature (29)  |  Life (439)  |  Little (28)  |  Morning (8)  |  Nothing (85)  |  Pattern (17)  |  Planet (77)  |  Random (11)  |  Rise (12)  |  Rule (50)  |  Science (850)  |  Setting (4)  |  Stick (7)  |  Sun (109)  |  Throw (11)  |  Universe (274)  |  Unpredictability (4)  |  West (4)  |  World (206)

Impressed force is the action exerted on a body to change its state either of resting or of moving uniformly straight forward.
The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1687), 3rd edition (1726), trans. I. B. Cohen and Anne Whitman (1999), Definition 4, 405.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (52)  |  Force (72)  |  Impressed (3)  |  Law Of Motion (7)  |  Rest (28)

In all speculations on the origin, or agents that have produced the changes on this globe, it is probable that we ought to keep within the boundaries of the probable effects resulting from the regular operations of the great laws of nature which our experience and observation have brought within the sphere of our knowledge. When we overleap those limits, and suppose a total change in nature's laws, we embark on the sea of uncertainty, where one conjecture is perhaps as probable as another; for none of them can have any support, or derive any authority from the practical facts wherewith our experience has brought us acquainted.
Observations on the Geology of the United States of America (1817), iv-v.
Science quotes on:  |  Authority (23)  |  Conjecture (15)  |  Experience (128)  |  Fact (311)  |  Geology (144)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Law Of Nature (29)  |  Limit (33)  |  Observation (256)  |  Origin (33)  |  Practical (30)  |  Probability (54)  |  Speculation (40)  |  Uncertainty (23)

In attempting to explain geological phenomena, the bias has always been on the wrong side; there has always been a disposition to reason á priori on the extraordinary violence and suddenness of changes, both in the inorganic crust of the earth, and in organic types, instead of attempting strenuously to frame theories in accordance with the ordinary operations of nature.
Letter to Rev. W. Whewell (7 Mar 1837). Quoted in Mrs Lyell (ed.), Life, Letters and Journals of Sir Charles Lyell, Bart (1881), Vol. 2, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Phenomenon (113)  |  Reason (172)

In every living being there exists a capacity for endless diversity of form; each possesses the power of adapting its organization to the variations of the external world, and it is this power, called into activity by cosmic changes, which has enabled the simple zoophytes of the primitive world to climb to higher and higher stages of organization, and has brought endless variety into nature.
From Gottfried Reinold Treviranus, Biologie, oder Philosophie der lebenden Natur [Biology, or Philosophy of Animate Nature], quoted in Lecture 1, August Weismann (1904, 2nd German ed.) as translated in August Weismann, Margaret R. Thomson (trans.), The Evolution Theory, Vol 1., 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (48)  |  Being (34)  |  Capacity (14)  |  Climb (6)  |  Cosmic (4)  |  Diversity (32)  |  Enable (9)  |  Endless (12)  |  Exist (13)  |  External (18)  |  Form (65)  |  Higher (18)  |  Living (23)  |  Nature (524)  |  Organism (66)  |  Organization (49)  |  Possess (3)  |  Power (98)  |  Primitive (13)  |  Simple (24)  |  Stage (15)  |  Variation (32)  |  Variety (28)  |  World (206)  |  Zoophyte (3)

In science the important thing is to modify and change one's ideas as science advances.
As given by in Bertha McCool, 'The Development of Embryology', Bios (Oct 1935), 6, No. 3, 303. Also in Rudolf Franz Flesch, The Art of Clear Thinking (1951), 122. Webmaster has also seen this attributed to Herbert Spencer, but has yet found such examples date only after 2002.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (26)  |  Idea (220)  |  Importance (98)  |  Modification (21)  |  Science (850)

In the past century, there were more changes than in the previous thousand years. The new century will see changes that will dwarf those of the last.
Referring to the 19th and 20th centuries.
Lecture, 'Discovery of the Future' at the Royal Institution (1902). Quoted in Martin J. Rees, Our Final Hour: a Scientist's Warning (2004), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Century (37)  |  Dwarf (3)

It is a curious situation that the sea, from which life first arose should now be threatened by the activities of one form of that life. But the sea, though changed in a sinister way, will continue to exist; the threat is rather to life itself.
The Sea Around Us (1951).
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (48)  |  Arise (5)  |  Continue (3)  |  Curious (4)  |  Existence (145)  |  Form (65)  |  Life (439)  |  Life (439)  |  Marine Biology (11)  |  Sea (56)  |  Sinister (7)  |  Situation (21)  |  Threat (9)

It is both a sad and a happy fact of engineering history that disasters have been powerful instruments of change. Designers learn from failure. Industrial society did not invent grand works of engineering, and it was not the first to know design failure. What it did do was develop powerful techniques for learning from the experience of past disasters. It is extremely rare today for an apartment house in North America, Europe, or Japan to fall down. Ancient Rome had large apartment buildings too, but while its public baths, bridges and aqueducts have lasted for two thousand years, its big residential blocks collapsed with appalling regularity. Not one is left in modern Rome, even as ruin.
In Why Things Bite Back: Technology and the Revenge of Unintended Consequences (1997), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Bath (4)  |  Bridge (12)  |  Bridge Engineering (7)  |  Building (32)  |  Collapse (8)  |  Designer (6)  |  Disaster (14)  |  Engineering (59)  |  Experience (128)  |  Fact (311)  |  Failure (55)  |  Grand (5)  |  Happiness (56)  |  History (151)  |  Industry (47)  |  Instrument (37)  |  Invention (167)  |  Lasting (3)  |  Learning (123)  |  Powerful (12)  |  Rarity (6)  |  Regularity (11)  |  Residence (2)  |  Rome (4)  |  Ruin (13)  |  Sadness (6)  |  Society (81)  |  Thousand (29)  |  Year (61)

It would not become physical science to see in its self created, changeable, economical tools, molecules and atoms, realities behind phenomena... The atom must remain a tool for representing phenomena.
'The Economical Nature of Physics' (1882), in Popular Scientfic Lectures, trans. Thomas J. McConnack (1910), 206-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (164)  |  Creation (124)  |  Molecule (80)  |  Phenomenon (113)  |  Physical Science (31)  |  Tool (30)

It's funny how worms can turn leaves into silk.
But funnier far is the cow:
She changes a field of green grass into milk
And not a professor knows how.
In Dorothy Caruso, Enrico Caruso: His Life and Death (1963), 42. Written for Michael Pupin, who made a similar statement in prose: “Look at those animals and remember the greatest scientists in the world have never discovered how to make grass into milk.”
Science quotes on:  |  Cow (17)  |  Field (68)  |  Funny (4)  |  Grass (8)  |  Green (9)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Leaf (18)  |  Milk (7)  |  Professor (21)  |  Silk (4)  |  Turn (21)  |  Worm (11)

It's important to always bear in mind that life occurs in historical time. Everyone in every culture lives in some sort of historical time, though it might not be perceived in the same way an outside observer sees it. It's an interesting question, “When is now?” “Now” can be drawn from some point like this hour, this day, this month, this lifetime, or this generation. “Now” can also have occurred centuries ago; things like unfair treaties, the Trail of Tears, and the Black Hawk War, for instance, remain part of the “Now” from which many Native Americans view their place in time today. Human beings respond today to people and events that actually occurred hundreds or even thousands of years ago. Ethnohistorians have played a major role in showing how now is a social concept of time, and that time is part of all social life. I can only hope that their work will further the understanding that the study of social life is a study of change over time.
From Robert S. Grumet, 'An Interview with Anthony F. C. Wallace', Ethnohistory (Winter 1998), 45, No. 1, 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Century (37)  |  Concept (36)  |  Culture (42)  |  Generation (50)  |  Historical (3)  |  Hour (13)  |  Hundred (11)  |  Life (439)  |  Lifetime (10)  |  Month (6)  |  Native American (2)  |  Now (4)  |  Occur (8)  |  Question (152)  |  Social (14)  |  Study (149)  |  Thousand (29)  |  Time (160)  |  Understanding (222)  |  Unfair (2)  |  Year (61)

James Watt patented his steam engine on the eve of the American Revolution, consummating a relationship between coal and the new Promethean spirit of the age, and humanity made its first tentative steps into an industrial way of life that would, over the next two centuries, forever change the world.
In The Hydrogen Economy: The Creation of the Worldwide Energy Web and the Redistribution of Power on Earth (2002), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (56)  |  Century (37)  |  Coal (20)  |  Consummation (2)  |  First (39)  |  Forever (13)  |  Humanity (45)  |  Industrial Revolution (2)  |  New (99)  |  Patent (19)  |  Prometheus (3)  |  Relationship (35)  |  Spirit (52)  |  Steam Engine (21)  |  Step (25)  |  Tentative (4)  |  James Watt (6)  |  Way Of Life (3)  |  World (206)

Life arose as a living molecule or protogene, the progression from this stage to that of the ameba is at least as great as from ameba to man. All the essential problems of living organisms are already solved in the one-celled (or, as many now prefer to say, noncellular) protozoan and these are only elaborated in man or the other multicellular animals. The step from nonlife to life may not have been so complex, after all, and that from cell to multicellular organism is readily comprehensible. The change from protogene to protozoan was probably the most complex that has occurred in evolution, and it may well have taken as long as the change from protozoan to man.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 16
Science quotes on:  |  Amoeba (4)  |  Animal (138)  |  Cell (83)  |  Complexity (49)  |  Comprehension (29)  |  Elaboration (4)  |  Essential (41)  |  Evolution (332)  |  Life (439)  |  Man (258)  |  Molecule (80)  |  Occurrence (20)  |  Organism (66)  |  Problem (178)  |  Progression (8)  |  Protozoan (2)  |  Solution (109)  |  Stage (15)

Mankind has always drawn from outside sources of energy. This island was the first to harness coal and steam. But our present sources stand in the ratio of a million to one, compared with any previous sources. The release of atomic energy will change the whole structure of society.
Address to New Europe Group meeting on the third anniversary of the Hiroshima bomb. Quoted in New Europe Group, In Commemoration of Professor Frederick Soddy (1956), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Energy (11)  |  Coal (20)  |  Energy (101)  |  Harnessing (3)  |  Island (8)  |  Mankind (105)  |  Outside (10)  |  Ratio (9)  |  Release (8)  |  Society (81)  |  Source (32)  |  Steam (14)  |  Structure (101)

Modern physics has changed nothing in the great classical disciplines of, for instance, mechanics, optics, and heat. Only the conception of hitherto unexplored regions, formed prematurely from a knowledge of only certain parts of the world, has undergone a decisive transformation. This conception, however, is always decisive for the future course of research.
In Philosophical Problems of Nuclear Science: Eight Lectures (1952), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Classical (7)  |  Conception (28)  |  Future (101)  |  Heat (48)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Mechanics (25)  |  Modern Physics (5)  |  Optics (7)  |  Research (358)  |  Transformation (27)  |  Unexplored (4)

Modern theories did not arise from revolutionary ideas which have been, so to speak, introduced into the exact sciences from without. On the contrary they have forced their way into research which was attempting consistently to carry out the programme of classical physics—they arise out of its very nature. It is for this reason that the beginnings of modern physics cannot be compared with the great upheavals of previous periods like the achievements of Copernicus. Copernicus’s idea was much more an import from outside into the concepts of the science of his time, and therefore caused far more telling changes in science than the ideas of modern physics are creating to-day.
In Philosophical Problems of Nuclear Science: Eight Lectures (1952), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempting (2)  |  Beginning (66)  |  Classical Physics (4)  |  Consistently (2)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (30)  |  Idea (220)  |  Import (2)  |  Modern (42)  |  Nature (524)  |  Programme (3)  |  Reason (172)  |  Research (358)  |  Revolution (33)  |  Theory (346)  |  Upheaval (2)

Most advances in science come when a person for one reason or another is forced to change fields.
Viewing a new field with fresh eyes, and bringing prior knowledge, results in creativity.
Quoted in Roger Von Oech, A Whack on the Side of the Head (1982), 71. (Berger is credited in the Introduction in a listed of people providing ideas and suggestions.) In Cheryl Farr, Jim Rhode, Newsletters, Patients and You (1985), 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Field (68)  |  Progress (198)  |  Science (850)

Mr. Hillaire Belloc has pointed out that science has changed greatly, and for the worse, since it became popular. Some hundred years ago, or more, only very unusual, highly original spirits were attracted to science at all; scientific work was therefore carried out by men of exceptional intelligence. Now, scientists are turned out by mass production in our universities.
In Science is a Sacred Cow (1950), 23-24.
Science quotes on:  |  Exceptional (2)  |  Intelligence (72)  |  Mass Production (2)  |  Original (13)  |  Point (29)  |  Popularity (2)  |  Spirit (52)  |  University (28)  |  Worse (9)

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.
Quoted in John M. Richardson (ed.), Making it Happen (1982).
Science quotes on:  |  Citizen (10)  |  Commitment (8)  |  Doubt (66)  |  Group (24)  |  Small (31)  |  World (206)

Never was there a dogma more calculated to foster indolence, and to blunt the keen edge of curiosity, than ... [the] assumption of the discordance between the former and the existing causes of change.
Principles of Geology(1830-3), Vol. 3, 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Curiosity (49)  |  Dogma (13)  |  Indolence (5)

Nevertheless if any skillful Servant of Nature shall bring force to bear on matter, and shall vex it and drive it to extremities as if with the purpose of reducing it to nothing, then will matter (since annihilation or true destruction is not possible except by the omnipotence of God) finding itself in these straits, turn and transform itself into strange shapes, passing from one change to another till it has gone through the whole circle and finished the period.
De Sapientio Veterum (1609) XIII 'Proteus; or matter' in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), TheWorks of Francis Bacon (1887-1901), Vol. 6, 726.
Science quotes on:  |  Matter (131)

Nothing is constant but change! All existence is a perpetual flux of “being and becoming!” That is the broad lesson of the evolution of the world.
As translated by Joseph McCabe in Haeckel's The Wonders of Life: a Popular Study of Biological Philosophy (1904), 100.
Science quotes on:  |  Evolution (332)

Now, we propose in the first place to show, that this law of organic progress is the law of all progress. Whether it be in the development of the Earth, in the development in Life upon its surface, in the development of Society, of Government, of Manufactures, of Commerce, of Language, Literature, Science, Art, this same evolution of the simple into the complex, through a process of continuous differentiation, holds throughout. From the earliest traceable cosmical changes down to the latest results of civilization, we shall find that the transformation of the homogeneous into the heterogeneous is that in which Progress essentially consists.
'Progress: Its Law and Cause', Westminster Review (1857), 67, 446-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (76)  |  Civilization (84)  |  Commerce (9)  |  Complexity (49)  |  Continuous (7)  |  Cosmos (21)  |  Development (117)  |  Differentiation (11)  |  Earth (238)  |  Government (48)  |  Heterogeneity (3)  |  Homogeneity (3)  |  Language (67)  |  Law (269)  |  Life (439)  |  Literature (32)  |  Manufacturing (14)  |  Organic (18)  |  Progress (198)  |  Proposition (28)  |  Science (850)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Society (81)  |  Surface (35)  |  Trace (10)  |  Transformation (27)

Often the great scientists, by turning the problem around a bit, changed a defect to an asset. For example, many scientists when they found they couldn't do a problem finally began to study why not. They then turned it around the other way and said, “But of course, this is what it is” and got an important result.
'You and Your Research', Bell Communications Research Colloquium Seminar, 7 Mar 1986.
Science quotes on:  |  Defect (8)  |  Importance (98)  |  Problem (178)  |  Result (127)  |  Studying (2)  |  Turn (21)

On our planet, all objects are subject to continual and inevitable changes which arise from the essential order of things. These changes take place at a variable rate according to the nature, condition, or situation of the objects involved, but are nevertheless accomplished within a certain period of time. Time is insignificant and never a difficulty for Nature. It is always at her disposal and represents an unlimited power with which she accomplishes her greatest and smallest tasks.
Hydrogéologie (1802), trans. A. V. Carozzi (1964), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Nature (524)  |  Time (160)

One never finds fossil bones bearing no resemblance to human bones. Egyptian mummies, which are at least three thousand years old, show that men were the same then. The same applies to other mummified animals such as cats, dogs, crocodiles, falcons, vultures, oxen, ibises, etc. Species, therefore, do not change by degrees, but emerged after the new world was formed. Nor do we find intermediate species between those of the earlier world and those of today's. For example, there is no intermediate bear between our bear and the very different cave bear. To our knowledge, no spontaneous generation occurs in the present-day world. All organized beings owe their life to their fathers. Thus all records corroborate the globe's modernity. Negative proof: the barbaritY of the human species four thousand years ago. Positive proof: the great revolutions and the floods preserved in the traditions of all peoples.
'Note prese al Corso di Cuvier. Corso di Geologia all'Ateneo nel 1805', quoted in Pietro Corsi, The Age of Lamarck, trans. J. Mandelbaum (1988), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (138)  |  Bear (5)  |  Bone (25)  |  Cat (16)  |  Crocodile (3)  |  Degree (18)  |  Dog (24)  |  Egypt (9)  |  Emergence (15)  |  Falcon (2)  |  Find (46)  |  Flood (16)  |  Fossil (71)  |  Generation (50)  |  Human (155)  |  Human Species (2)  |  Intermediate (10)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Men (12)  |  Mummy (2)  |  Never (19)  |  New (99)  |  People (72)  |  Positive (8)  |  Preservation (13)  |  Proof (133)  |  Resemblance (15)  |  Revolution (33)  |  Same (15)  |  Species (91)  |  Spontaneity (4)  |  Thousand (29)  |  Tradition (16)  |  Vulture (3)  |  World (206)  |  Year (61)

One summer day, while I was walking along the country road on the farm where I was born, a section of the stone wall opposite me, and not more than three or four yards distant, suddenly fell down. Amid the general stillness and immobility about me the effect was quite startling. ... It was the sudden summing up of half a century or more of atomic changes in the material of the wall. A grain or two of sand yielded to the pressure of long years, and gravity did the rest.
Under the Apple-Trees (1916), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (164)  |  Country (42)  |  Effect (70)  |  Entropy (25)  |  Fall (30)  |  Farm (4)  |  Grain (10)  |  Gravity (59)  |  Material (54)  |  Pressure (18)  |  Road (18)  |  Sand (8)  |  Section (2)  |  Startling (4)  |  Stillness (3)  |  Stone (19)  |  Suddenness (2)  |  Sum (17)  |  Summer (9)  |  Walk (23)  |  Wall (10)  |  Yielding (2)

Organized Fossils are to the naturalist as coins to the antiquary; they are the antiquities of the earth; and very distinctly show its gradual regular formation, with the various changes inhabitants in the watery element.
Stratigraphical System of Organized Fossils (1817), ix-x.
Science quotes on:  |  Antiquary (2)  |  Antiquity (5)  |  Coin (3)  |  Formation (32)  |  Fossil (71)  |  Inhabitant (6)  |  Naturalist (27)  |  Organization (49)  |  Water (116)

Philosophers and psychiatrists should explain why it is that we mathematicians are in the habit of systematically erasing our footsteps. Scientists have always looked askance at this strange habit of mathematicians, which has changed little from Pythagoras to our day.
From the second Fubini Lecture, delivered at the Villa Gualino, Torino (2 Jun 1998), 'What is Invariant Theory, Really?' Collected in Henry H. Crapo and D. Senato (eds.), Algebraic Combinatorics and Computer Science: A Tribute to Gian-Carlo Rota (2001), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Explain (10)  |  Footstep (3)  |  Habit (41)  |  Little (28)  |  Mathematician (105)  |  Philosopher (65)  |  Psychiatrist (8)  |  Pythagoras (17)  |  Scientist (224)  |  Strange (15)  |  Systematically (3)

Progress is a nice word. But change is its motivator and change has its enemies.
In The Pursuit of Justice (1964), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Enemy (24)  |  Nice (4)  |  Progress (198)  |  Word (96)

Progress, far from consisting in change, depends on retentiveness. When change is absolute there remains no being to improve and no direction is set for possible improvement: and when experience is not retained, as among savages, infancy is perpetual. Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.
The Life of Reason, or the Phases of Human Progress (1954), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (32)  |  Condemnation (8)  |  Experience (128)  |  Improvement (35)  |  Progress (198)  |  Remember (18)  |  Repeat (10)  |  Retention (2)

Research under a paradigm must be a particularly effective way of inducing paradigm change.
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Paradigm (10)  |  Research (358)

Science can amuse and fascinate us all, but it is engineering that changes the world.
Isaac Asimov's Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (14)  |  Engineering (59)  |  Fascination (13)  |  Science (850)

Science is out of the reach of morals, for her eyes are fixed upon eternal truths. Art is out of the reach of morals, for her eyes are fixed upon things beautiful and immortal and ever-changing.
In his dialogue 'The Critic As Artist', collected in Intentions (1904), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (83)  |  Eternal (13)  |  Eye (61)  |  Immortal (4)  |  Moral (38)  |  Science And Art (54)  |  Truth (440)

Science no longer is in the position of observer of nature, but rather recognizes itself as part of the interplay between man and nature. The scientific method ... changes and transforms its object: the procedure can no longer keep its distance from the object.
The Representation of Nature in Contemporary Physics', Symbolism in Religion and Literature (1960), 231. Cited in John J. Stuhr, Philosophy and the Reconstruction of Culture (1993), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Interplay (2)  |  Man (258)  |  Nature (524)  |  Object (44)  |  Observer (8)  |  Procedure (11)  |  Recognize (11)  |  Science (850)  |  Scientific Method (98)  |  Transform (3)

Since biological change occurs slowly and cultural changes occur in every generation, it is futile to try to explain the fleeting phenomena of culture by a racial constant. We can often explain them—in terms of contact with other peoples, of individual genius, of geography—but not by racial differences.
An Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (1934), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Culture (42)  |  Difference (129)  |  Genius (86)  |  Geography (14)  |  Race (35)

Some things mankind can finish and be done with, but not ... science, that persists, and changes from ancient Chaldeans studying the stars to a new telescope with a 200-inch reflector and beyond; not religion, that persists, and changes from old credulities and world views to new thoughts of God and larger apprehensions of his meaning.
In 'What Keeps Religion Going?', collected in Living Under Tension: Sermons On Christianity Today (1941), 51-52.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (27)  |  Apprehension (8)  |  Beyond (17)  |  Credulity (5)  |  Finish (10)  |  God (229)  |  Mankind (105)  |  Meaning (53)  |  Persist (5)  |  Reflector (3)  |  Religion (116)  |  Science (850)  |  Science And Religion (153)  |  Star (124)  |  Studying (2)  |  Telescope (39)  |  Thought (168)

Such an atmosphere is un-American, the most un-American thing we have to contend with today. It is the climate of a totalitarian country in which scientists are expected to change their theories to match changes in the police state's propaganda line.
[Stinging rebuke of J. Parnell Thomas, Chairman, House Committee on Un-American activities, who had attacked Dr. Condon (1 Mar 1948) as a weak link in American atomic security.]
Opening address (13 Sep 1953) at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science where Condon would be elected as the new AAAS president. Obituary, New York Times (27 Mar 1974), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Politics (50)  |  Propaganda (2)  |  Scientist (224)  |  Theory (346)  |  Totalitarian (4)

The advance from the simple to the complex, through a process of successive differentiations, is seen alike in the earliest changes of the Universe to which we can reason our way back, and in the earliest changes which we can inductively establish; it is seen in the geologic and climatic evolution of the Earth; it is seen in the unfolding of every single organism on its surface, and in the multiplication of kinds of organisms; it is seen in the evolution of Humanity, whether contemplated in the civilized individual, or in the aggregate of races; it is seen in the evolution of Society in respect alike of its political, its religious, and its economical organization; and it is seen in the evolution of all those endless concrete and abstract products of human activity which constitute the environment of our daily life. From the remotest past which Science can fathom, up to the novelties of yesterday, that in which Progress essentially consists, is the transformation of the homogeneous into the heterogeneous.
Progress: Its Law and Cause (1857), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (18)  |  Activity (48)  |  Advancement (26)  |  Aggregation (4)  |  Civilization (84)  |  Climate (24)  |  Complexity (49)  |  Concrete (7)  |  Contemplation (17)  |  Daily Life (3)  |  Differentiation (11)  |  Early (8)  |  Earth (238)  |  Economy (25)  |  Environment (70)  |  Establishment (18)  |  Evolution (332)  |  Fathom (3)  |  Geology (144)  |  Heterogeneity (3)  |  Homogeneity (3)  |  Humanity (45)  |  Individual (54)  |  Induction (22)  |  Kind (26)  |  Multiplication (11)  |  Novelty (9)  |  Organism (66)  |  Organism (66)  |  Organization (49)  |  Past (40)  |  Politics (50)  |  Process (97)  |  Product (31)  |  Race (35)  |  Reason (172)  |  Religion (116)  |  Remoteness (4)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Society (81)  |  Succession (29)  |  Surface (35)  |  Transformation (27)  |  Unfolding (4)  |  Universe (274)  |  Yesterday (3)

The advance of science is not comparable to the changes of a city, where old edifices are pitilessly torn down to give place to new, but to the continuous evolution of zoologic types which develop ceaselessly and end by becoming unrecognisable to the common sight, but where an expert eye finds always traces of the prior work of the centuries past. One must not think then that the old-fashioned theories have been sterile and vain.
The Value of Science (1905), in The Foundations of Science: Science and Hypothesis, The Value of Science, Science and Method(1946), trans. by George Bruce Halsted, 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (49)  |  Century (37)  |  City (12)  |  Common (42)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Continuity (17)  |  Demolition (4)  |  Development (117)  |  Edifice (8)  |  End (48)  |  Evolution (332)  |  Expert (16)  |  New (99)  |  Old-Fashioned (3)  |  Past (40)  |  Pity (2)  |  Prior (2)  |  Replacement (8)  |  Science (850)  |  Sight (11)  |  Theory (346)  |  Thinking (163)  |  Trace (10)  |  Type (15)  |  Vanity (8)  |  Work (186)  |  Zoology (12)

The changing of Bodies into Light, and Light into Bodies, is very conformable to the Course of Nature, which seems delighted with Transmutations.
Opticks, 2nd edition (1718), Book 3, Query 30, 349.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (88)  |  Light (112)  |  Transmutation (10)

The comparatively small progress toward universal acceptance made by the metric system seems to be due not altogether to aversion to a change of units, but also to a sort of irrepressible conflict between the decimal and binary systems of subdivision.
[Remarking in 1892 (!) that although decimal fractions were introduced about 1585, America retains measurements in halves, quarters, eights and sixteenths in various applications such as fractions of an inch, the compass or used by brokers.]
'Octonary Numeration', Bulletin of the New York Mathematical Society (1892),1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Aversion (3)  |  Binary (4)  |  Compass (13)  |  Conflict (24)  |  Decimal (8)  |  Fraction (4)  |  Inch (3)  |  Metric System (5)  |  Progress (198)  |  Unit (15)

The Epicureans, according to whom animals had no creation, doe suppose that by mutation of one into another, they were first made; for they are the substantial part of the world; like as Anaxagoras and Euripides affirme in these tearmes: nothing dieth, but in changing as they doe one for another they show sundry formes.
Plutarch
Fom Morals, translated by Philemon Holland, The Philosophie, Commonlie Called, the Moral Written by the Learned Philosopher Plutarch of Chæronea (1603), 846. As cited in Harris Hawthorne Wilder, History of the Human Body (1909), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Anaxagoras (10)  |  Animal (138)  |  Creation (124)  |  Euripides (3)  |  Evolution (332)  |  Form (65)  |  Mutation (12)  |  Sundry (2)  |  Suppose (14)

The equations of dynamics completely express the laws of the historical method as applied to matter, but the application of these equations implies a perfect knowledge of all the data. But the smallest portion of matter which we can subject to experiment consists of millions of molecules, not one of which ever becomes individually sensible to us. We cannot, therefore, ascertain the actual motion of anyone of these molecules; so that we are obliged to abandon the strict historical method, and to adopt the statistical method of dealing with large groups of molecules … Thus molecular science teaches us that our experiments can never give us anything more than statistical information, and that no law derived from them can pretend to absolute precision. But when we pass from the contemplation of our experiments to that of the molecules themselves, we leave a world of chance and change, and enter a region where everything is certain and immutable.
'Molecules' (1873). In W. D. Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 2, 374.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (59)  |  Chance (73)  |  Contemplation (17)  |  Derivation (8)  |  Dynamics (3)  |  Equation (45)  |  Experiment (367)  |  History (151)  |  Information (51)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Law (269)  |  Matter (131)  |  Molecule (80)  |  Motion (64)  |  Precision (19)  |  Statistics (74)

The fact is, a biologist to-day [1928] is pretty much where an engineer would be if he knew even in detail the cycle of chemical changes which took place within an internal combustion engine but was wholly ignorant of the disposition of tho moving parts.
As guest of honour, closing day address (Jun 1928), Sixth Colloid Symposium, Toronto, Canada, 'Living Matter', printed in Harry Boyer Weiser (ed.), Colloid Symposium Monograph (1928), Vol. 6, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Biologist (15)  |  Chemical (36)  |  Cycle (12)  |  Detail (32)  |  Disposition (7)  |  Engineer (32)  |  Ignorant (7)  |  Internal Combustion Engine (2)  |  Knowledge (662)

The fact that astronomies change while the stars abide is a true analogy of every realm of human life and thought, religion not least of all.
In The Living of These Days: An Autobiography (1956), 230.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (26)  |  Astronomy (103)  |  Fact (311)  |  Human Life (5)  |  Least (6)  |  Realm (16)  |  Religion (116)  |  Science And Religion (153)  |  Star (124)  |  Thought (168)  |  Truth (440)

The function of Art is to imitate Nature in her manner of operation. Our understanding of “her manner of operation&Rdquo; changes according to advances in the sciences.
John Cage
A Year from Monday (1969), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (49)  |  Manner (10)  |  Nature (524)  |  Operation (54)  |  Science And Art (54)

The ginkgo tree is from the era of dinosaurs, but while the dinosaur has been extinguished, the modern ginkgo has not changed. After the atomic bomb in Hiroshima, the ginkgo was the first tree that came up. It’s amazing.
As quoted in Columbia University Press Release, On Campus (21 Feb 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  Amazing (7)  |  Atomic Bomb (62)  |  Dinosaur (13)  |  Era (6)  |  Extinguish (2)  |  Hiroshima (9)  |  Modern (42)  |  Tree (81)

The historian of science may be tempted to claim that when paradigms change, the world itself changes with them. Led by a new paradigm, scientists adopt new instruments and look in new places. even more important, during revolutions, scientists see new and different things when looking with familiar instruments in places they have looked before. It is rather as if the professional community had been suddenly transported to another planet where familiar objects are seen in a different light and are joined by unfamiliar ones as well.
In The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962, 2nd ed. 1970). Excerpt 'Revolutions as Changes of World View', in Joseph Margolis and Jacques Catudal, The Quarrel between Invariance and Flux (2001), 35-36.
Science quotes on:  |  Claim (22)  |  Community (26)  |  Difference (129)  |  Familiarity (10)  |  Historian (18)  |  History Of Science (30)  |  Instrument (37)  |  Look (30)  |  New (99)  |  Object (44)  |  Paradigm (10)  |  Place (30)  |  Planet (77)  |  Profession (23)  |  Revolution (33)  |  Science (850)  |  Temptation (5)  |  Transportation (6)  |  Unfamiliarity (3)  |  World (206)

The most consequential change in man's view of the world, of living nature and of himself came with the introduction, over a period of some 100 years beginning only in the 18th century, of the idea of change itself, of change over periods of time: in a word, of evolution.
'Evolution', Scientific American (Jul 1978), 239:1, 47.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (5)  |  Evolution (332)  |  Idea (220)  |  Introduction (15)  |  Man (258)  |  Nature (524)  |  Period (22)  |  Time (160)  |  View (48)  |  World (206)

The One remains, the many change and pass;
Heaven's light forever shines, Earth's shadows fly;
Life, like a dome of many-coloured glass,
Stains the white radiance of Eternity,
Until Death tramples it to fragments.
Adonais (1821), St. 52. In K. Raine (ed.), Shelley (1974), 209.
Science quotes on:  |  Color (7)  |  Death (175)  |  Eternity (20)  |  Fragment (13)  |  Glass (19)  |  Heaven (53)  |  Life (439)  |  Light (112)  |  Radiance (3)  |  Shadow (16)  |  Shine (3)  |  Stain (7)

The philosophers have only interpreted the world in various ways, the point is to change it.
Epitaph on Marx's tombstone in Highgate Cemetery.
Karl Marx
Theses on Feuerbach (1845), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Interpretation (36)  |  Philosopher (65)  |  World (206)

The physiological combustion theory takes as its starting point the fundamental principle that the amount of heat that arises from the combustion of a given substance is an invariable quantity–i.e., one independent of the circumstances accompanying the combustion–from which it is more specifically concluded that the chemical effect of the combustible materials undergoes no quantitative change even as a result of the vital process, or that the living organism, with all its mysteries and marvels, is not capable of generating heat out of nothing.
Bemerkungen über das mechanische Aequivalent der Wärme [Remarks on the Mechanical Equivalent of Heat] (1851), 17-9. Trans. Kenneth L. Caneva, Robert Mayer and the Conservation of Energy (1993), 240.
Science quotes on:  |  Circumstance (25)  |  Combustion (10)  |  Conclusion (73)  |  Fundamental (56)  |  Generation (50)  |  Heat (48)  |  Independent (15)  |  Life (439)  |  Marvel (16)  |  Mystery (71)  |  Organism (66)  |  Physiology (40)  |  Principle (96)  |  Process (97)  |  Quantitative (8)  |  Reaction (47)  |  Theory (346)

The powers which tend to preserve, and those which tend to change the condition of the earth's surface, are never in equilibrio; the latter are, in all cases, the most powerful, and, in respect of the former, are like living in comparison of dead forces. Hence the law of decay is one which suffers no exception: The elements of all bodies were once loose and unconnected, and to the same state nature has appointed that they should all return... TIME performs the office of integrating the infinitesimal parts of which this progression is made up; it collects them into one sum, and produces from them an amount greater than any that can be assigned.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 116-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (10)  |  Appointment (3)  |  Assignment (6)  |  Collection (24)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Condition (66)  |  Decay (19)  |  Earth (238)  |  Equilibrium (12)  |  Exception (16)  |  Force (72)  |  Greater (15)  |  Infinitesimal (6)  |  Integration (10)  |  Law (269)  |  Loose (4)  |  Nature (524)  |  Performance (16)  |  Power (98)  |  Preservation (13)  |  Production (70)  |  Progression (8)  |  Return (10)  |  State (42)  |  Sum (17)  |  Surface (35)  |  Tendency (18)  |  Time (160)

The recurrence of a phenomenon like Edison is not very likely. The profound change of conditions and the ever increasing necessity of theoretical training would seem to make it impossible. He will occupy a unique and exalted position in the history of his native land, which might well be proud of his great genius and undying achievements in the interest of humanity.
As quoted in 'Tesla Says Edison Was an Empiricist', The New York Times (19 Oct 1931), 25. In 1884, Tesla had moved to America to assist Edison in the designing of motors and generators.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (70)  |  Condition (66)  |  Thomas Edison (26)  |  Exalted (2)  |  Genius (86)  |  History (151)  |  Humanity (45)  |  Impossible (26)  |  Interest (75)  |  Likelihood (3)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Occupy (6)  |  Phenomenon (113)  |  Position (18)  |  Profound (23)  |  Proud (2)  |  Theory (346)  |  Training (21)  |  Unique (8)

The sciences have sworn among themselves an inviolable partnership; it is almost impossible to separate them, for they would rather suffer than be torn apart; and if anyone persists in doing so, he gets for his trouble only imperfect and confused fragments. Yet they do not arrive all together, but they hold each other by the hand so that they follow one another in a natural order which it is dangerous to change, because they refuse to enter in any other way where they are called. ...
Les Préludes de l'Harmonie Universelle (1634), 135-139. In Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 9, 316.
Science quotes on:  |  Apart (3)  |  Confusion (17)  |  Danger (30)  |  Following (12)  |  Fragment (13)  |  Hold (20)  |  Imperfection (11)  |  Impossibility (31)  |  Inviolable (2)  |  Natural (47)  |  Order (59)  |  Partnership (3)  |  Persistence (9)  |  Refusal (10)  |  Science (850)  |  Separation (23)  |  Suffering (18)  |  Tear (11)  |  Together (15)  |  Trouble (22)

The Sun is no lonelier than its neighbors; indeed, it is a very common-place star,—dwarfish, though not minute,—like hundreds, nay thousands, of others. By accident the brighter component of Alpha Centauri (which is double) is almost the Sun's twin in brightness, mass, and size. Could this Earth be transported to its vicinity by some supernatural power, and set revolving about it, at a little less than a hundred million miles' distance, the star would heat and light the world just as the Sun does, and life and civilization might go on with no radical change. The Milky Way would girdle the heavens as before; some of our familiar constellations, such as Orion, would be little changed, though others would be greatly altered by the shifting of the nearer stars. An unfamiliar brilliant star, between Cassiopeia and Perseus would be—the Sun. Looking back at it with our telescopes, we could photograph its spectrum, observe its motion among the stars, and convince ourselves that it was the same old Sun; but what had happened to the rest of our planetary system we would not know.
The Solar System and its Origin (1935), 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (26)  |  Alpha Centauri (2)  |  Alteration (16)  |  Brightness (5)  |  Civilization (84)  |  Convince (7)  |  Double (6)  |  Dwarf (3)  |  Earth (238)  |  Heat (48)  |  Life (439)  |  Light (112)  |  Look (30)  |  Mass (23)  |  Mile (10)  |  Million (27)  |  Motion (64)  |  Nearness (3)  |  Neighbor (4)  |  Observation (256)  |  Photograph (12)  |  Planet (77)  |  Radical (9)  |  Revolution (33)  |  Shift (9)  |  Size (18)  |  Solar System (22)  |  Spectrum (17)  |  Star (124)  |  Sun (109)  |  Supernatural (8)  |  Telescope (39)  |  Transportation (6)  |  Twin (4)  |  Unfamiliarity (3)  |  World (206)

The theory of the earth is the science which describes and explains changes that the terrestrial globe has undergone from its beginning until today, and which allows the prediction of those it shall undergo in the future. The only way to understand these changes and their causes is to study the present-day state of the globe in order to gradually reconstruct its earlier stages, and to develop probable hypotheses on its future state. Therefore, the present state of the earth is the only solid base on which the theory can rely.
In Albert V. Carozzi, 'Forty Years of Thinking in Front of the Alps: Saussure's (1796) Unpublished Theory of the Earth', Earth Sciences History (1989), 8 136.
Science quotes on:  |  Base (10)  |  Beginning (66)  |  Cause (116)  |  Description (40)  |  Development (117)  |  Earth (238)  |  Explanation (84)  |  Future (101)  |  Globe (17)  |  Hypothesis (147)  |  Prediction (45)  |  Present (32)  |  Reconstruction (8)  |  Science (850)  |  Stage (15)  |  Study (149)  |  Terrestrial (7)  |  Theory (346)  |  Today (24)  |  Understanding (222)

The way in which the persecution of Galileo has been remembered is a tribute to the quiet commencement of the most intimate change in outlook which the human race had yet encountered. Since a babe was born in a manger, it may be doubted whether so great a thing has happened with so little stir
In Science and the Modern World (1925), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Baby (5)  |  Birth (45)  |  Commencement (3)  |  Encounter (6)  |  Galileo Galilei (64)  |  Great (58)  |  Human Race (27)  |  Intimate (4)  |  Outlook (7)  |  Persecution (5)  |  Quiet (3)  |  Remember (18)  |  Stir (5)  |  Tribute (3)

The weight of our civilization has become so great, it now ranks as a global force and a significant wild card in the human future along with the Ice Ages and other vicissitudes of a volatile and changeable planetary system
Rethinking Environmentalism (13 Dec 1998).
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (84)  |  Earth (238)  |  Future (101)  |  Global (6)  |  Great (58)  |  Human (155)  |  Ice Age (4)  |  Rank (13)  |  System (67)  |  Vicissitude (3)  |  Volatility (3)  |  Weight (40)

The world hates change, yet it is the only thing that has brought progress.
Science quotes on:  |  Progress (198)

The world is not as it was when it came from its Maker's hands. It has been modified by many great revolutions, brought about by an inner mechanism of which we very imperfectly comprehend the movements; but of which we gain a glimpse by studying their effects: and their many causes still acting on the surface of our globe with undiminished power, which are changing, and will continue to change it, as long as it shall last.
Letter 1 to William Wordsworth. Quoted in the appendix to W. Wordsworth, A Complete Guide to the Lakes, Comprising Minute Direction for the Tourist, with Mr Wordsworth's Description of the Scenery of the County and Three Letters upon the Geology of the Lake District (1841), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (52)  |  Cause (116)  |  Comprehension (29)  |  Effect (70)  |  Globe (17)  |  Great (58)  |  Imperfection (11)  |  Inner (9)  |  Maker (4)  |  Mechanism (25)  |  Modification (21)  |  Movement (32)  |  Power (98)  |  Revolution (33)  |  Study (149)  |  Surface (35)  |  World (206)

There rolls the deep where grew the tree.
O earth, what changes hast thou seen!
There where the long street roars, hath been
The stillness of the central sea.
The hills are shadows, and they flow
From form to form, and nothing stands;
They melt like mist, the solid lands,
Like clouds they shape themselves and go.
In Memoriam A. H. H. (1850), canto 123. Collected in Alfred Tennyson and William James Rolfe (ed.) The Poetic and Dramatic works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1898), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Central (8)  |  Cloud (21)  |  Deep (17)  |  Earth (238)  |  Flow (14)  |  Form (65)  |  Hill (14)  |  Land (25)  |  Melting (5)  |  Mist (2)  |  Nothing (85)  |  Roll (3)  |  Sea (56)  |  Seeing (28)  |  Shadow (16)  |  Shape (19)  |  Solid (14)  |  Stand (24)  |  Stillness (3)  |  Street (5)  |  Tree (81)

Thinking consists in envisaging, realizing structural features and structural requirements; proceeding in accordance with, and determined by, these requirements; thereby changing the situation in the direction of structural improvements.
In Productive Thinking (1959), 235.
Science quotes on:  |  Consist (8)  |  Direction (25)  |  Feature (14)  |  Improvement (35)  |  Realize (5)  |  Requirement (26)  |  Situation (21)  |  Structural (4)  |  Thinking (163)

Those who take refuge behind theological barbed wire fences, quite often wish they could have more freedom of thought, but fear the change to the great ocean of truth as they would a cold bath.
Quoted in Dr. D. M. Brooks, The Necessity of Atheism (1933), 341.
Science quotes on:  |  Bath (4)  |  Cold (22)  |  Fear (52)  |  Fence (6)  |  Freedom (41)  |  Ocean (54)  |  Refuge (4)  |  Theology (19)  |  Thought (168)  |  Truth (440)  |  Wish (18)

Though the world does not change with a change of paradigm, the scientist afterward works in a different world... I am convinced that we must learn to make sense of statements that at least resemble these. What occurs during a scientific revolution is not fully reducible to a re-interpretation of individual and stable data. In the first place, the data are not unequivocally stable.
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Data (53)  |  Interpretation (36)  |  Paradigm (10)  |  Scientific Revolution (8)  |  Understanding (222)  |  World (206)

Thought isn't a form of energy. So how on Earth can it change material processes? That question has still not been answered.
As quoted in Eric Roston, The Carbon Age: How Life's Core Element Has Become Civilization's Gratest Threat (2009), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (91)  |  Energy (101)  |  Material (54)  |  Process (97)  |  Question (152)  |  Thought (168)

To Nature nothing can be added; from Nature nothing can be taken away; the sum of her energies is constant, and the utmost man can do in the pursuit of physical truth, or in the applications of physical knowledge, is to shift the constituents of the never-varying total. The law of conservation rigidly excludes both creation and annihilation. Waves may change to ripples, and ripples to waves; magnitude may be substituted for number, and number for magnitude; asteroids may aggregate to suns, suns may resolve themselves into florae and faunae, and floras and faunas melt in air: the flux of power is eternally the same. It rolls in music through the ages, and all terrestrial energy—the manifestations of life as well as the display of phenomena—are but the modulations of its rhythm.
Conclusion of Heat Considered as a Mode of Motion: Being a Course of Twelve Lectures Delivered at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in the Season of 1862 (1863), 449.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (4)  |  Age (56)  |  Aggregate (4)  |  Air (84)  |  Annihilation (5)  |  Asteroid (5)  |  Conservation Of Energy (16)  |  Constant (14)  |  Constituent (8)  |  Creation (124)  |  Display (8)  |  Energy (101)  |  Fauna (5)  |  Flora (2)  |  Flux (4)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Life (439)  |  Magnitude (14)  |  Manifestation (21)  |  Melt (5)  |  Modulation (3)  |  Music (25)  |  Nature (524)  |  Nothing (85)  |  Number (88)  |  Phenomenon (113)  |  Power (98)  |  Resolve (7)  |  Rhythm (4)  |  Ripple (2)  |  Same (15)  |  Shift (9)  |  Substitute (10)  |  Sum (17)  |  Sun (109)  |  Terrestrial (7)  |  Total (13)  |  Truth (440)  |  Wave (32)

To trace the series of these revolutions, to explain their causes, and thus to connect together all the indications of change that are found in the mineral kingdom, is the proper object of a THEORY OF THE EARTH.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (116)  |  Connection (39)  |  Earth (238)  |  Explanation (84)  |  Finding (18)  |  Indication (15)  |  Kingdom (17)  |  Mineral (24)  |  Object (44)  |  Properness (2)  |  Revolution (33)  |  Series (18)  |  Theory (346)  |  Trace (10)

Unless man can make new and original adaptations to his environment as rapidly as his science can change the environment, our culture will perish.
On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy (1961), 348.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (24)  |  Culture (42)  |  Environment (70)  |  Mankind (105)  |  New (99)  |  Original (13)  |  Perish (11)  |  Rapidity (14)  |  Science (850)

Very few, even among those who have taken the keenest interest in the progress of the revolution in natural knowledge set afoot by the publication of the 'Origin of Species'; and who have watched, not without astonishment, the rapid and complete change which has been effected both inside and outside the boundaries of the scientific world in the attitude of men's minds towards the doctrines which are expounded in that great work, can have been prepared for the extraordinary manifestation of affectionate regard for the man, and of profound reverence for the philosopher, which followed the announcement, on Thursday last, of the death of Mr Darwin.
'Obituary [of Charles Darwin]' (1882). In Collected Essays (1893), Vol. 2, 244.
Science quotes on:  |  Charles Darwin (211)  |  Doctrine (32)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Obituary (9)  |  Origin Of Species (35)

We cannot idealize technology. Technology is only and always the reflection of our own imagination, and its uses must be conditioned by our own values. Technology can help cure diseases, but we can prevent a lot of diseases by old-fashioned changes in behavior.
Remarks at Knoxville Auditorium Coliseum, Knoxville, Tennessee (10 Oct 1996) while seeking re-election. American Presidency Project web page.
Science quotes on:  |  Behaviour (22)  |  Condition (66)  |  Cure (48)  |  Disease (169)  |  Ideal (26)  |  Imagination (125)  |  Old-Fashioned (3)  |  Prevent (5)  |  Reflection (26)  |  Technology (95)  |  Value (63)

We have reason not to be afraid of the machine, for there is always constructive change, the enemy of machines, making them change to fit new conditions.
We suffer not from overproduction but from undercirculation. You have heard of technocracy. I wish I had those fellows for my competitors. I'd like to take the automobile it is said they predicted could be made now that would last fifty years. Even if never used, this automobile would not be worth anything except to a junkman in ten years, because of the changes in men's tastes and ideas. This desire for change is an inherent quality in human nature, so that the present generation must not try to crystallize the needs of the future ones.
We have been measuring too much in terms of the dollar. What we should do is think in terms of useful materials—things that will be of value to us in our daily life.
In 'Quotation Marks: Against Technocracy', New York Times (1 Han 1933), E4.
Science quotes on:  |  Afraid (7)  |  Automobile (9)  |  Circulation (12)  |  Competitor (2)  |  Condition (66)  |  Construction (34)  |  Daily Life (3)  |  Desire (45)  |  Doing (25)  |  Dollar (11)  |  Enemy (24)  |  Fifty (4)  |  Future (101)  |  Generation (50)  |  Human Nature (34)  |  Idea (220)  |  Inherent (15)  |  Junk (2)  |  Machine (55)  |  Measurement (108)  |  Need (54)  |  New (99)  |  Prediction (45)  |  Present (32)  |  Production (70)  |  Quality (27)  |  Reason (172)  |  Suffering (18)  |  Taste (16)  |  Ten (3)  |  Term (34)  |  Thinking (163)  |  Use (51)  |  Usefulness (52)  |  Value (63)  |  Wish (18)  |  Worth (24)  |  Year (61)

We know that there is an infinite, and we know not its nature. As we know it to be false that numbers are finite, it is therefore true that there is a numerical infinity. But we know not of what kind; it is untrue that it is even, untrue that it is odd; for the addition of a unit does not change its nature; yet it is a number, and every number is odd or even (this certainly holds of every finite number). Thus we may quite well know that there is a God without knowing what He is.
Pensées (1670), Section 1, aphorism 223. In H. F. Stewart (ed.), Pascal's Pensées (1950), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (12)  |  Even (2)  |  Falsity (9)  |  Finite (13)  |  God (229)  |  Infinity (44)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Number (88)  |  Odd (2)  |  Unit (15)

We may lay it down as an incontestible axiom, that, in all the operations of art and nature, nothing is created; an equal quantity of matter exists both before and after the experiment; the quality and quantity of the elements remain precisely the same; and nothing takes place beyond changes and modifications in the combination of these elements. Upon this principle the whole art of performing chemical experiments depends: We must always suppose an exact equality between the elements of the body examined and those of the products of its analysis.
Elements of Chemistry trans. Robert. Kerr, (1790, 5th Ed. 1802), Vol. 1, 226.
Science quotes on:  |  Analaysis (2)  |  Axiom (11)  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Combination (36)  |  Creation (124)  |  Element (68)  |  Element (68)  |  Equal (21)  |  Examination (46)  |  Experiment (367)  |  Matter (131)  |  Modification (21)  |  Principle (96)  |  Quality (27)  |  Quantity (23)  |  Same (15)

We may... have to relinquish the notion, explicit or implicit, that changes of paradigm carry scientists and those who learn from them closer and closer to the truth... The developmental process described in this essay has been a process of evolution from primitive beginnings—a process whose successive stages are characterized by an increasingly detailed and refined understanding of nature. But nothing that has been or will be said makes it a process of evolution toward anything.
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), 169-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (66)  |  Detail (32)  |  Development (117)  |  Evolution (332)  |  Nature (524)  |  Paradigm (10)  |  Primitive (13)  |  Process (97)  |  Scientist (224)  |  Succession (29)  |  Truth (440)  |  Understanding (222)

What is peculiar and new to the [19th] century, differentiating it from all its predecessors, is its technology. It was not merely the introduction of some great isolated inventions. It is impossible not to feel that something more than that was involved. ... The process of change was slow, unconscious, and unexpected. In the nineteeth century, the process became quick, conscious, and expected. ... The whole change has arisen from the new scientific information. Science, conceived not so much in its principles as in its results, is an obvious storehouse of ideas for utilisation. ... Also, it is a great mistake to think that the bare scientific idea is the required invention, so that it has only to be picked up and used. An intense period of imaginative design lies between. One element in the new method is just the discovery of how to set about bridging the gap between the scientific ideas, and the ultimate product. It is a process of disciplined attack upon one difficulty after another This discipline of knowledge applies beyond technology to pure science, and beyond science to general scholarship. It represents the change from amateurs to professionals. ... But the full self-conscious realisation of the power of professionalism in knowledge in all its departments, and of the way to produce the professionals, and of the importance of knowledge to the advance of technology, and of the methods by which abstract knowledge can be connected with technology, and of the boundless possibilities of technological advance,—the realisation of all these things was first completely attained in the nineteeth century.
In Science and the Modern World (1925, 1997), 96.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (7)  |  Amateur (7)  |  Boundless (6)  |  Conscious (5)  |  Design (36)  |  Differentiate (3)  |  Expected (2)  |  Ideal (26)  |  Imagination (125)  |  Information (51)  |  Invention (167)  |  Isolated (5)  |  Peculiar (10)  |  Predecessor (13)  |  Professional (9)  |  Realisation (2)  |  Scholarship (5)  |  Storehouse (2)  |  Unconscious (7)  |  Unexpected (13)

What is possible can never be demonstrated to be false; and 'tis possible the course of nature may change, since we can conceive such a change. Nay, I will go farther, and assert, that he could not so much as prove by any probable arguments, that the future must be conformable to the past. All probable arguments are built on the supposition, that there is this conformity betwixt the future and the past, and therefore can never prove it. This conformity is a matter of fact, and if it must be proved, will admit of no proof but from experience. But our experience in the past can be a proof of nothing for the future, but upon a supposition, that there is a resemblance betwixt them. This therefore is a point, which can admit of no proof at all, and which we take for granted without any proof.
An Abstract of A Treatise on Human Nature (1740), ed. John Maynard Keynes and Piero Sraffa (1938), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Conformity (4)  |  Experience (128)  |  Fact (311)  |  False (29)  |  Future (101)  |  Nature (524)  |  Past (40)  |  Possible (19)  |  Proof (133)  |  Supposition (25)

When I hear to-day protests against the Bolshevism of modern science and regrets for the old-established order, I am inclined to think that Rutherford, not Einstein, is the real villain of the piece. When we compare the universe as it is now supposed to be with the universe as we had ordinarily preconceived it, the most arresting change is not the rearrangement of space and time by Einstein but the dissolution of all that we regard as most solid into tiny specks floating in void. That gives an abrupt jar to those who think that things are more or less what they seem. The revelation by modern physics of the void within the atom is more disturbing than the revelation by astronomy of the immense void of interstellar space.
In The Nature of the Physical World (1928, 2005), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abrupt (2)  |  Arrest (3)  |  Astronomy (103)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Dissolution (3)  |  Disturbance (12)  |  Albert Einstein (155)  |  Floating (2)  |  Interstellar (2)  |  Modern Science (4)  |  Order (59)  |  Preconception (6)  |  Protest (3)  |  Regard (15)  |  Regret (8)  |  Revelation (24)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (30)  |  Solid (14)  |  Space (64)  |  Space And Time (4)  |  Speck (5)  |  Universe (274)  |  Villain (2)  |  Void (8)

When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change. [Dubious attribution]
This is a quote included only to attached a caution about its authenticity. Webmaster came across this in a few places that fail to cite any source, for example, Bonnie Harris, Confident Parents, Remarkable Kids: 8 Principles for Raising Kids You’ll Love to Live With (2008), 15. Being in context of a non-science book raises an eye-brow, and the quote being stated with “As so-and-so said...” raises the other eyebrow. “As so-and-so said” seems a red flag for an author too lazy to check the source. So, if you know that a reliable primary source actually exists, please contact Webmaster. Meanwhile Webmaster suggests this is a quote of dubious authenticity. It appears in a few books published in recent years when quotes are readily grabbed from the web and spread virally without authentication. It is also called an “ancient Tao observation” by Wayne W. Dyer in A New Way of Thinking, a New Way of Being: Experiencing the Tao Te Ching (2009), Introduction, v.
Science quotes on:  |  Look (30)

While reading in a textbook of chemistry, ... I came across the statement, 'nitric acid acts upon copper.' I was getting tired of reading such absurd stuff and I determined to see what this meant. Copper was more or less familiar to me, for copper cents were then in use. I had seen a bottle marked 'nitric acid' on a table in the doctor's office where I was then 'doing time.' I did not know its peculiarities, but I was getting on and likely to learn. The spirit of adventure was upon me. Having nitric acid and copper, I had only to learn what the words 'act upon' meant... I put one of them [cent] on the table, opened the bottle marked 'nitric acid'; poured some of the liquid on the copper; and prepared to make an observation. But what was this wonderful thing which I beheld? The cent was already changed, and it was no small change either. A greenish blue liquid foamed and fumed over the cent and over the table. The air in the neighborhood of the performance became colored dark red. A great colored cloud arose. This was disagreeable and suffocating—how should I stop this? I tried to get rid of the objectionable mess by picking it up and throwing it out of the window, which I had meanwhile opened. I learned another fact—nitric acid not only acts upon copper but it acts upon fingers. The pain led to another unpremeditated experiment. I drew my fingers across my trousers and another fact was discovered. Nitric acid acts upon trousers. Taking everything into consideration, that was the most impressive experiment, and, relatively, probably the most costly experiment I have ever performed.
F. H. Getman, The Life of Ira Remsen (1940), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (6)  |  Act (20)  |  Adventure (20)  |  Air (84)  |  Biography (198)  |  Bottle (5)  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Cloud (21)  |  Copper (8)  |  Cost (15)  |  Experiment (367)  |  Finger (14)  |  Fume (4)  |  Impressiveness (2)  |  Liquid (11)  |  Meaning (53)  |  Mess (3)  |  Neighborhood (3)  |  Nitric Acid (2)  |  Observation (256)  |  Pain (48)  |  Peculiarity (11)  |  Reading (23)  |  Spirit (52)  |  Suffocation (2)  |  Table (8)  |  Trousers (3)  |  Window (11)

Who shall declare the time allotted to the human race, when the generations of the most insignificant insect also existed for unnumbered ages? Yet man is also to vanish in the ever-changing course of events. The earth is to be burnt up, and the elements are to melt with fervent heat—to be again reduced to chaos—possibly to be renovated and adorned for other races of beings. These stupendous changes may be but cycles in those great laws of the universe, where all is variable but the laws themselves and He who has ordained them.
Physical Geography (1848), Vol. 1, 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Adornment (2)  |  Age (56)  |  Being (34)  |  Chaos (33)  |  Course (25)  |  Cycle (12)  |  Declaration (3)  |  Earth (238)  |  Element (68)  |  Event (45)  |  Existence (145)  |  Fervent (2)  |  Generation (50)  |  Heat (48)  |  Human Race (27)  |  Insect (38)  |  Insignificant (2)  |  Law (269)  |  Mankind (105)  |  Melt (5)  |  Race (35)  |  Renovation (2)  |  Stupendous (2)  |  Time (160)  |  Universe (274)  |  Vanish (4)

Why it is that animals, instead of developing in a simple and straightforward way, undergo in the course of their growth a series of complicated changes, during which they often acquire organs which have no function, and which, after remaining visible for a short time, disappear without leaving a trace ... To the Darwinian, the explanation of such facts is obvious. The stage when the tadpole breathes by gills is a repetition of the stage when the ancestors of the frog had not advanced in the scale of development beyond a fish.
In The Works of Francis Maitland Balfour (1885), Vol. 1, 702.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (21)  |  Advance (49)  |  Ancestor (17)  |  Animal (138)  |  Breathe (9)  |  Complication (15)  |  Charles Darwin (211)  |  Development (117)  |  Disappearance (14)  |  Explanation (84)  |  Fact (311)  |  Fish (31)  |  Frog (22)  |  Function (41)  |  Growth (65)  |  Leaving (4)  |  Obvious (24)  |  Organ (39)  |  Remain (18)  |  Repetition (18)  |  Series (18)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Stage (15)  |  Trace (10)  |  Undergo (4)  |  Visibility (6)

You will be astonished when I tell you what this curious play of carbon amounts to. A candle will burn some four, five, six, or seven hours. What, then, must be the daily amount of carbon going up into the air in the way of carbonic acid! ... Then what becomes of it? Wonderful is it to find that the change produced by respiration ... is the very life and support of plants and vegetables that grow upon the surface of the earth.
In A Course of Six Lectures on the Chemical History of a Candle (1861), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Astonishment (14)  |  Atmosphere (41)  |  Burning (12)  |  Candle (9)  |  Carbon (26)  |  Carbon Dioxide (14)  |  Carbonic Acid (3)  |  Curiosity (49)  |  Daily (5)  |  Growth (65)  |  Life (439)  |  Plant (93)  |  Play (20)  |  Respiration (10)  |  Support (24)  |  Vegetable (12)  |  Wonder (62)

[Certain students] suppose that because science has penetrated the structure of the atom it can solve all the problems of the universe. ... They are known in every ... college as the most insufferable, cocksure know-it-alls. If you want to talk to them about poetry, they are likely to reply that the "emotive response" to poetry is only a conditioned reflex .... If they go on to be professional scientists, their sharp corners are rubbed down, but they undergo no fundamental change. They most decidedly are not set apart from the others by their intellectual integrity and faith, and their patient humility in front of the facts of nature.... They are uneducated, in the fullest sense of the word, and they certainly are no advertisement for the claims of science teachers.
In Science is a Sacred Cow (1950), 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Advertisement (7)  |  Atom (164)  |  Claim (22)  |  College (15)  |  Emotion (27)  |  Faith (73)  |  Fundamental (56)  |  Humility (12)  |  Integrity (6)  |  Intellect (95)  |  Nature (524)  |  Patience (15)  |  Pentration (2)  |  Poetry (61)  |  Problem (178)  |  Profession (23)  |  Response (8)  |  Solution (109)  |  Structure (101)  |  Student (50)  |  Supposition (25)  |  Uneducated (2)

[It] is the little causes, long continued, which are considered as bringing about the greatest changes of the earth.
Theory of the Earth, with Proofs and Illustrations, Vol. 2 (1795), 205.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (238)  |  Time (160)

[My advice] will one day be found
With other relics of 'a former world,'
When this world shall be former, underground,
Thrown topsy-turvy, twisted, crisped, and curled,
Baked, fried or burnt, turned inside-out, or drowned,
Like all the worlds before, which have been hurled
First out of, and then back again to Chaos,
The Superstratum which will overlay us.
Don Juan (1821), Canto 9, Verse 37. In Jerome J. McGann (ed.), Lord Byron: The Complete Poetical Works (1986), Vol. 5, 420.
Science quotes on:  |  Chaos (33)

[To the cultures of Asia and the continent of Africa] it is the Western impact which has stirred up the winds of change and set the processes of modernization in motion. Education brought not only the idea of equality but also another belief which we used to take for granted in the West—the idea of progress, the idea that science and technology can be used to better human conditions. In ancient society, men tended to believe themselves fortunate if tomorrow was not worse than today and anyway, there was little they could do about it.
Lecture at State University of Iowa (6 Apr 1961). In Barbara Ward, The Unity of the Free World (1961), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (27)  |  Belief (135)  |  Condition (66)  |  Education (173)  |  Equality (7)  |  Fortune (15)  |  Progress (198)  |  Science (850)  |  Society (81)  |  Technology (95)  |  Today (24)  |  Tomorrow (14)  |  Worse (9)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

New Book


The Simpsons and their Mathematical Secrets,
by Simon Singh

Cleverly embedded in many Simpsons plots are subtle references to mathematics, because the show's brilliant comedy writers with advanced degrees in math or science. Singh offers an entirely new insight into the most successful show in television history.