Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Aspect

Aspect Quotes (16 quotes)

FAUSTUS: How many heavens or spheres are there?
MEPHASTOPHILIS: Nine: the seven planets, the firmament, and the empyreal heaven.
FAUSTUS: But is there not coelum igneum, et crystallinum?
MEPH.: No Faustus, they be but fables.
FAUSTUS: Resolve me then in this one question: Why are not conjunctions, oppositions, aspects, eclipses all at one time, but in some years we have more, in some less?
MEPH.: Per inaequalem motum respectu totius.
FAUSTUS: Well, I am answered. Now tell me who made the world.
MEPH.: I will not.
FAUSTUS: Sweet Mephastophilis, tell me.
MEPH.: Move me not, Faustus.
FAUSTUS: Villain, have I not bound thee to tell me any thing?
MEPH.: Ay, that is not against our kingdom.
This is. Thou are damn'd, think thou of hell.
FAUSTUS: Think, Faustus, upon God that made the world!
MEPH.: Remember this.
Doctor Faustus: A 1604-Version Edition, edited by Michael Keefer (1991), Act II, Scene iii, lines 60-77, 43-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (96)  |  Eclipse (11)  |  Fable (3)  |  Firmament (6)  |  God (234)  |  Heaven (55)  |  Kingdom (18)  |  Maker (4)  |  Opposition (22)  |  Planet (84)  |  Question (159)  |  World (231)

From packaging materials, through fibers, foams and surface coatings, to continuous extrusions and large-scale moldings, plastics have transformed almost every aspect of life. Without them, much of modern medicine would be impossible and the consumer electronics and computer industries would disappear. Plastic sewage and water pipes alone have made an immeasurable contribution to public health worldwide.
'Plastics—No Need To Apologize', Trends in Polymer Science (Jun 1996), 4, 172. In Paul C. Painter and Michael M. Coleman, Essentials of Polymer Science and Engineering (2008), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Computer (51)  |  Consumer (3)  |  Contribution (23)  |  Disappearance (15)  |  Electronics (6)  |  Fiber (2)  |  Health (93)  |  Immeasurable (2)  |  Impossibility (32)  |  Industry (49)  |  Life (460)  |  Medicine (185)  |  Modern (44)  |  Pipe (4)  |  Plastic (11)  |  Public (35)  |  Sewage (3)  |  Surface (37)  |  Transformation (27)  |  Water (122)  |  Worldwide (4)

From the aspect of energy, renewed by radio-active phenomena, material corpuscles may now be treated as transient reservoirs of concentrated power. Though never found in a state of purity, but always more or less granulated (even in light) energy nowadays represents for science the most primitive form of universal stuff.
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 42. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  Corpuscle (5)  |  Energy (103)  |  Form (70)  |  Light (117)  |  Material (60)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Power (103)  |  Primitive (17)  |  Purity (8)  |  Radioactive (2)  |  Renew (3)  |  Reservoir (2)  |  State (43)  |  Stuff (8)  |  Universal (26)

Gradually, … the aspect of science as knowledge is being thrust into the background by the aspect of science as the power of manipulating nature. It is because science gives us the power of manipulating nature that it has more social importance than art. Science as the pursuit of truth is the equal, but not the superior, of art. Science as a technique, though it may have little intrinsic value, has a practical importance to which art cannot aspire.
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), xxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (80)  |  Background (13)  |  Equal (22)  |  Importance (106)  |  Intrinsic (7)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Nature (534)  |  Power (103)  |  Practical (30)  |  Pursuit (34)  |  Science (875)  |  Science And Art (58)  |  Social (16)  |  Superior (14)  |  Technique (13)  |  Technology (98)  |  Truth (450)  |  Value (63)

Human personality resembles a coral reef: a large hard/dead structure built and inhabited by tiny soft/live animals. The hard/dead part of our personality consists of habits, memories, and compulsions and will probably be explained someday by some sort of extended computer metaphor. The soft/live part of personality consists of moment-to-moment direct experience of being. This aspect of personality is familiar but somewhat ineffable and has eluded all attempts at physical explanation.
Quoted in article 'Nick Herbert', in Gale Cengage Learning, Contemporary Authors Online (2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (143)  |  Attempt (41)  |  Being (34)  |  Build (23)  |  Compulsion (6)  |  Computer (51)  |  Coral Reef (5)  |  Dead (16)  |  Direct (9)  |  Experience (132)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Extend (6)  |  Familiar (5)  |  Habit (42)  |  Hard (18)  |  Human (168)  |  Inhabitant (7)  |  Large (22)  |  Life (460)  |  Memory (42)  |  Metaphor (9)  |  Moment (21)  |  Personality (19)  |  Physical (28)  |  Probability (56)  |  Resemblance (15)  |  Soft (3)  |  Someday (3)  |  Structure (104)  |  Tiny (9)

I’m not an historian but I can get interested—obsessively interested—with any aspect of the past, whether it’s palaeontology or archaeology or the very recent past.
Interview with Robert McCrum, in The Observer (26 Aug 2001).
Science quotes on:  |  Archaeology (23)  |  Historian (18)  |  Interest (82)  |  Paleontologist (9)  |  Past (42)  |  Recent (14)

Mathematics as an expression of the human mind reflects the active will, the contemplative reason, and the desire for aesthetic perfection. Its basic elements are logic and intuition, analysis and construction, generality and individuality. Though different traditions may emphasize different aspects, it is only the interplay of these antithetic forces and the struggle for their synthesis that constitute the life, usefulness, and supreme value of mathematical science.
In Richard Courant and Herbert Robbins, What Is Mathematics?: An Elementary Approach to Ideas and Methods (1941, 1996), x.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (48)  |  Aesthetics (3)  |  Analysis (82)  |  Antithesis (3)  |  Basic (18)  |  Constitution (12)  |  Construction (36)  |  Contemplation (17)  |  Desire (46)  |  Difference (135)  |  Element (68)  |  Emphasis (9)  |  Expression (44)  |  Force (75)  |  Generality (14)  |  Human Mind (21)  |  Individuality (4)  |  Interplay (2)  |  Intuition (26)  |  Logic (132)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Perfection (43)  |  Reason (173)  |  Reflection (26)  |  Struggle (18)  |  Supreme (8)  |  Synthesis (23)  |  Tradition (17)  |  Usefulness (54)  |  Value (63)  |  Will (22)

Physical science enjoys the distinction of being the most fundamental of the experimental sciences, and its laws are obeyed universally, so far as is known, not merely by inanimate things, but also by living organisms, in their minutest parts, as single individuals, and also as whole communities. It results from this that, however complicated a series of phenomena may be and however many other sciences may enter into its complete presentation, the purely physical aspect, or the application of the known laws of matter and energy, can always be legitimately separated from the other aspects.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (72)  |  Community (27)  |  Complete (13)  |  Complication (16)  |  Distinction (19)  |  Energy (103)  |  Enjoyment (14)  |  Inanimate (8)  |  Individual (59)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Law (273)  |  Legitimacy (2)  |  Life (460)  |  Matter (135)  |  Organism (70)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Physical (28)  |  Physical Science (32)  |  Presentation (9)  |  Result (129)  |  Science (875)  |  Separation (23)

Science appears to us with a very different aspect after we have found out that it is not in lecture rooms only, and by means of the electric light projected on a screen, that we may witness physical phenomena, but that we may find illustrations of the highest doctrines of science in games and gymnastics, in travelling by land and by water, in storms of the air and of the sea, and wherever there is matter in motion.
'Introductory Lecture on Experimental Physics' (1871). In W. D. Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 2, 243.
Science quotes on:  |  Game (28)  |  Lecture (31)  |  Matter (135)  |  Motion (64)  |  Science (875)  |  Storm (13)  |  Travel (14)

Since 1849 I have studied incessantly, under all its aspects, a question which was already in my mind [since 1832. I confess that my scheme is still a mere dream, and I do not shut my eyes to the fact that so long as I alone believe it to be possible, it is virtually impossible. ... The scheme in question is the cutting of a canal through the Isthmus of Suez. This has been thought of from the earliest historical times, and for that very reason is looked upon as impracticable. Geographical dictionaries inform us indeed that the project would have been executed long ago but for insurmountable obstacles. [On his inspiration for the Suez Canal.]
Letter to M.S.A. Ruyssenaers, Consul-General for Holland in Egypt, from Paris (8 Jul 1852), seeking support. Collected in Ferdinand de Lesseps, The Suez Canal: Letters and Documents Descriptive of Its Rise and Progress in 1854-1856 (1876), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (139)  |  Dream (39)  |  Idea (226)  |  Impossibility (32)  |  Incessantly (2)  |  Inspiration (30)  |  Insurmountable (2)  |  Isthmus (2)  |  Obstacle (9)  |  Possibility (70)  |  Question (159)  |  Study (157)

The philosophy that I have worked under most of my life is that the serious study of natural history is an activity which has far-reaching effects in every aspect of a person's life. It ultimately makes people protective of the environment in a very committed way. It is my opinion that the study of natural history should be the primary avenue for creating environmentalists.
As quoted in William V. Mealy, ‎Peter Friederici and ‎Roger Tory Peterson Institute, Value in American Wildlife Art: Proceedings of the 1992 Forum (1992), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (48)  |  Avenue (2)  |  Create (15)  |  Effect (72)  |  Environment (75)  |  Environmentalist (4)  |  Far-Reaching (2)  |  Life (460)  |  Make (10)  |  Natural History (23)  |  Opinion (81)  |  Person (38)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Primary (9)  |  Protective (2)  |  Serious (13)  |  Study (157)  |  Ultimately (3)  |  Work (198)

The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom.
IIsaac Asimov's Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 281.
Science quotes on:  |  Faster (5)  |  Gather (7)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Life (460)  |  Sadness (7)  |  Science (875)  |  Society (84)  |  Wisdom (91)

Through radio I look forward to a United States of the World. Radio is standardizing the peoples of the Earth, English will become the universal language because it is predominantly the language of the ether. The most important aspect of radio is its sociological influence. (1926)
As quoted (without citation) in Orrin Elmer Dunlap, Radio's 100 Men of Science: Biographical Narratives of Pathfinders (1944), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (250)  |  English (8)  |  Ether (15)  |  Important (20)  |  Influence (47)  |  Language (71)  |  Predominantly (2)  |  Radio (16)  |  United (2)  |  Universal (26)  |  World (231)

To us … the only acceptable point of view appears to be the one that recognizes both sides of reality—the quantitative and the qualitative, the physical and the psychical—as compatible with each other, and can embrace them simultaneously … It would be most satisfactory of all if physis and psyche (i.e., matter and mind) could be seen as complementary aspects of the same reality.
From Lecture at the Psychological Club of Zurich (1948), 'The Influence of Archetypal Ideas on the Scientific Theories of Kepler', collected in Writings on Physics and Philosophy (1994), 260, as translated by Robert Schlapp.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptable (2)  |  Appearance (47)  |  Compatible (2)  |  Complementary (4)  |  Embrace (13)  |  Matter (135)  |  Mind (272)  |  Physical (28)  |  Point Of View (10)  |  Qualitative (4)  |  Quantitative (9)  |  Reality (67)  |  Recognition (38)  |  Satisfactory (5)  |  Simultaneous (4)

We should remember that there was once a discipline called natural philosophy. Unfortunately, this discipline seems not to exist today. It has been renamed science, but science of today is in danger of losing much of the natural philosophy aspect.
[Pointing out the increasing specialization of science during the century to explain the resistance to his ideas,]
(1986) Quoted in Anthony L. Peratt, 'Dean of the Plasma Dissidents', Washington Times, supplement: The World and I (May 1988),192.
Science quotes on:  |  Discipline (15)  |  Natural Philosophy (9)  |  Science (875)

[The Book of Genesis is] [p]rofoundly interesting and indeed pathetic to me are those attempts of the opening mind of man to appease its hunger for a Cause. But the Book of Genesis has no voice in scientific questions. It is a poem, not a scientific treatise. In the former aspect it is for ever beautiful; in the latter it has been, and it will continue to be, purely obstructive and hurtful.'
In 'Professor Virchow and Evolution', Fragments of Science (1879), Vol. 2, 377. Tyndall is quoting himself from “four years ago”&mdashthus c.1875.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (41)  |  Beautiful (16)  |  Bible (43)  |  Cause (122)  |  Early (10)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Genesis (10)  |  Hunger (7)  |  Interest (82)  |  Man (258)  |  Obstruction (2)  |  Origin Of The Universe (10)  |  Poem (76)  |  Profound (23)  |  Scientific (55)  |  Treatise (8)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton