Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Amount

Amount Quotes (11 quotes)

Benford's Law of Controversy: Passion is inversely proportional to the amount of real information available.
In novel, Timescape (1992), no page numbering. The reference in the orginal text uses the past tense.
Science quotes on:  |  Availability (9)  |  Controversy (13)  |  Information (56)  |  Inverse (3)  |  Passion (24)  |  Proportion (24)  |  Real (28)

I am absolutely enraptured by the atmosphere of a wreck. A dead ship is the house of a tremendous amount of life—fish and plants. The mixture of life and death is mysterious, even religious. There is the same sense of peace and mood that you feel on entering a cathedral.
Quoted in 'Sport: Poet of the Depths', Time (28 Mar 1960)
Science quotes on:  |  Atmosphere (42)  |  Cathedral (9)  |  Death (183)  |  Entering (2)  |  Feeling (47)  |  Fish (33)  |  House (19)  |  Life (460)  |  Marine Biology (11)  |  Mood (3)  |  Mystery (74)  |  Peace (23)  |  Plant (96)  |  Religion (120)  |  Sense (104)  |  Ship (18)  |  Tremendous (2)  |  Wreck (3)

Like taxes, radioactivity has long been with us and in increasing amounts; it is not to be hated and feared, but accepted and controlled. Radiation is dangerous, let there be no mistake about that—but the modern world abounds in dangerous substances and situations too numerous to mention. ... Consider radiation as something to be treated with respect, avoided when practicable, and accepted when inevitable.
Recommending the same view towards radiation as the risks of automobile travel.
While in the Office of Naval Research. In Must we Hide? (1949), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Control (41)  |  Danger (32)  |  Fear (53)  |  Hate (8)  |  Increase (36)  |  Radioactivity (21)  |  Tax (13)

The amount of knowledge which we can justify from evidence directly available to us can never be large. The overwhelming proportion of our factual beliefs continue therefore to be held at second hand through trusting others, and in the great majority of cases our trust is placed in the authority of comparatively few people of widely acknowledged standing.
Personal Knowledge (1958), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgement (5)  |  Authority (24)  |  Availability (9)  |  Belief (139)  |  Case (16)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Continuation (13)  |  Directly (5)  |  Evidence (83)  |  Fact (325)  |  Few (7)  |  Great (62)  |  Hold (21)  |  Justification (20)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Large (22)  |  Majority (17)  |  Never (19)  |  Other (17)  |  Overwhelming (10)  |  People (72)  |  Place (32)  |  Proportion (24)  |  Second Hand (2)  |  Standing (4)  |  Trust (13)  |  Widely (2)

The end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth century were remarkable for the small amount of scientific movement going on in this country, especially in its more exact departments. ... Mathematics were at the last gasp, and Astronomy nearly so—I mean in those members of its frame which depend upon precise measurement and systematic calculation. The chilling torpor of routine had begun to spread itself over all those branches of Science which wanted the excitement of experimental research.
Quoted in Sophia Elizabeth De Morgan, Memoir of Augustus De Morgan (1882), 41
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (5)  |  19th Century (8)  |  Astronomy (105)  |  Calculation (41)  |  Chill (4)  |  Department (11)  |  Exact (16)  |  Excitement (20)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Last (13)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Measurement (112)  |  Movement (31)  |  Precision (19)  |  Remarkable (14)  |  Research (360)  |  Routine (4)  |  Science (875)  |  Small (35)  |  Spread (7)  |  Systematic (7)  |  Want (32)

The known is finite, the unknown infinite; spiritually we find ourselves on a tiny island in the middle of a boundless ocean of the inexplicable. It is our task, from generation to generation, to drain a small amount of additional land.
As given in Herbert and W. Roesky and Klaud Mφckel, translated from the original German by T.N. Mitchell and W.E. Russey, Chemical Curiosities: Spectacular Experiments and Inspired Quotes (1996), 212. It is a restatement of an original quote from concluding remarks to a chapter by Thomas Huxley, 'On the Reception of the ‘Origin of Species’', the last chapter in Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887), Vol. 1, 557. Webmaster suggests, the original Huxley quote was translated for the original German text, and when that was translated for the English edition, the quote morphed into into the form above.
Science quotes on:  |  Additional (2)  |  Boundless (6)  |  Drain (4)  |  Finite (13)  |  Generation (56)  |  Inexplicable (2)  |  Infinite (39)  |  Island (8)  |  Known (5)  |  Land (27)  |  Middle (7)  |  Ocean (56)  |  Small (35)  |  Task (32)  |  Tiny (9)  |  Unknown (40)

The most striking impression was that of an overwhelming bright light. I had seen under similar conditions the explosion of a large amount—100 tons—of normal explosives in the April test, and I was flabbergasted by the new spectacle. We saw the whole sky flash with unbelievable brightness in spite of the very dark glasses we wore. Our eyes were accommodated to darkness, and thus even if the sudden light had been only normal daylight it would have appeared to us much brighter than usual, but we know from measurements that the flash of the bomb was many times brighter than the sun. In a fraction of a second, at our distance, one received enough light to produce a sunburn. I was near Fermi at the time of the explosion, but I do not remember what we said, if anything. I believe that for a moment I thought the explosion might set fire to the atmosphere and thus finish the earth, even though I knew that this was not possible.
Enrico Fermi: Physicist (1970), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodation (4)  |  April (3)  |  Atmosphere (42)  |  Atomic Bomb (71)  |  Brightness (5)  |  Condition (68)  |  Darkness (11)  |  Daylight (5)  |  Earth (250)  |  Explosion (10)  |  Explosive (7)  |  Enrico Fermi (11)  |  Finish (11)  |  Fire (59)  |  Flash (8)  |  Fraction (4)  |  Impression (32)  |  Light (117)  |  Measurement (112)  |  Overwhelming (10)  |  Possibility (70)  |  Second (8)  |  Sky (32)  |  Spectacle (4)  |  Test (46)

The powers which tend to preserve, and those which tend to change the condition of the earth's surface, are never in equilibrio; the latter are, in all cases, the most powerful, and, in respect of the former, are like living in comparison of dead forces. Hence the law of decay is one which suffers no exception: The elements of all bodies were once loose and unconnected, and to the same state nature has appointed that they should all return... TIME performs the office of integrating the infinitesimal parts of which this progression is made up; it collects them into one sum, and produces from them an amount greater than any that can be assigned.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 116-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Appointment (3)  |  Assignment (6)  |  Change (133)  |  Collection (26)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Condition (68)  |  Decay (19)  |  Earth (250)  |  Equilibrium (12)  |  Exception (16)  |  Force (75)  |  Greater (16)  |  Infinitesimal (6)  |  Integration (11)  |  Law (273)  |  Loose (4)  |  Nature (534)  |  Performance (16)  |  Power (103)  |  Preservation (14)  |  Production (72)  |  Progression (8)  |  Return (13)  |  State (43)  |  Sum (18)  |  Surface (37)  |  Tendency (18)  |  Time (170)

There exists for every liquid a temperature at which no amount of pressure is sufficient to retain it in the liquid form.
[These words are NOT by Thomas Andrews. See below.]
This is NOT a quote by Andrews. It is only included here to provide this caution, because at least one book attributes it incorrectly to Andrews, as in John Daintith, Biographical Encyclopedia of Scientists (3rd. ed., 2008), 19. Webmaster has determined that these words are those of William Allen Miller, in Elements of Chemistry (1855), Vol. 1, 257. In the article on Thomas Andrews in Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1970), Vol. 1, 161, the later, third edition (1863) of Miller's textbook is named as the first printed account of Andrews' work. (Andrews had furnished his experimental results to Miller by letter.) After stating Miller's description of Andrews' results, the article in DSB refers ambiguously to “his” summary and gives the quote above. No quotation marks are present in Miller's book. Specifically, in fact, the words in the summary are by Miller. This is seen in the original textbook, because Miller prefaced the quote with “From these experiments it is obvious that...” and is summarizing the related work of several scientists, not just Andrews. Miller described the earlier experiments of those other researchers in the immediately preceding pages. It is clear that the quote does not come from Andrews when comparing Miller's first edition (1855), which had not yet included the work by Andrews. Thus, the same summary words (as quoted above) in the earliest edition refer to the experiments of only the other researchers, not including Andrews. Furthermore, the quote is not present in the Bakerian Lecture by Andrews on his work, later published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society (1869). Webmaster speculates Daintith's book was written relying on a misreading of the ambiguous sentence in DSB.
Science quotes on:  |  Existence (150)  |  Form (70)  |  Liquid (12)  |  Pressure (18)  |  Retention (2)  |  Sufficient (8)  |  Temperature (23)

There were details like clothing, hair styles and the fragile objects that hardly ever survive for the archaeologist—musical instruments, bows and arrows, and body ornaments depicted as they were worn. … No amounts of stone and bone could yield the kinds of information that the paintings gave so freely
As quoted in Current Biography Yearbook (1985), 259.
Science quotes on:  |  Archaeologist (9)  |  Arrow (8)  |  Bone (26)  |  Bow (4)  |  Clothing (5)  |  Detail (33)  |  Fragile (3)  |  Freely (2)  |  Giving (5)  |  Hair (9)  |  Information (56)  |  Instrument (40)  |  Kind (27)  |  Music (26)  |  Ornament (9)  |  Painting (17)  |  Stone (20)  |  Survival (32)  |  Yield (7)

We must remember that all our [models of flying machine] inventions are but developments of crude ideas; that a commercially successful result in a practically unexplored field cannot possibly be got without an enormous amount of unremunerative work. It is the piled-up and recorded experience of many busy brains that has produced the luxurious travelling conveniences of to-day, which in no way astonish us, and there is no good reason for supposing that we shall always be content to keep on the agitated surface of the sea and air, when it is possible to travel in a superior plane, unimpeded by frictional disturbances.
Paper to the Royal Society of New South Wales (4 Jun 1890), as quoted in Octave Chanute, Progress in Flying Machines (1894), 2226.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Brains (3)  |  Busy (6)  |  Commercially (2)  |  Content (17)  |  Crude (6)  |  Disturbance (12)  |  Enormous (16)  |  Experience (132)  |  Field (69)  |  Flying Machine (3)  |  Good (81)  |  Idea (226)  |  Model (31)  |  Plane (5)  |  Possible (19)  |  Practically (2)  |  Produce (6)  |  Reason (173)  |  Remember (19)  |  Result (129)  |  Sea (57)  |  Successful (5)  |  Superior (14)  |  Supposing (2)  |  Surface (37)  |  Today (24)  |  Travel (14)  |  Unexplored (5)  |  Work (198)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton