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Science Quotes by Newspaper (7 quotes)

[Editorial cartoon showing an executive sitting behind a desk with a Big Oil nameplate]
You want Coal? We own the mines.
You want oil and gas? We own the wells.
You want nuclear energy? We own the uranium.
You want solar power? We own the er..ah..
Solar power isn't feasible.
— Newspaper
Mike Peters in Dayton Daily News. Please contact webmaster if you know the date of publication. It was on the cover of the book Solar Gas (1979) by David Hoye.
Science quotes on:  |  Coal (20)  |  Feasibility (2)  |  Gas (30)  |  Mine (6)  |  Nuclear Energy (3)  |  Owner (2)  |  Solar Energy (13)  |  Well (7)

CREATION OF LIFE.
The Startling Discovery of Prof. Loeb.
Lower Animals Produced by Chemical Means.
Process May Apply to the Human Species.
Immaculate Conception is Explained.
Wonderful Experiments Conducted at Woods Hole.
— Newspaper
The Boston Herald (26 Nov 1899), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Biochemistry (32)  |  Life (439)  |  Jacques Loeb (7)

Earth, Skinned Alive.
[Headline for deforestation book review.]
— Newspaper
Headline to book review by Stephen J. Pyne in New York Times (21 Apr 1991), BR19. (The book being reviewed was Kenton Miller and Laura Tangley, Trees of Life: Saving Tropical Forests and Their Biological Wealth.)
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (10)  |  Deforestation (25)  |  Earth (238)  |  Rain Forest (14)

Food analysis is a veritable toddler among scientific fields.
— Newspaper
From editorial, 'Vegging Out,' New York Times (14 Apr 1993), A20, reporting a scientist found people on a diet heavy in vegetables produces genistein, which blocks angiogenesis, with possible implications in cancer control.
Science quotes on:  |  Field (68)

Paris ... On this side of the ocean it is difficult to understand the susceptibility of American citizens on the subject and precisely why they should so stubbornly cling to the biblical version. It is said in Genesis the first man came from mud and mud is not anything very clean. In any case if the Darwinian hypothesis should irritate any one it should only be the monkey. The monkey is an innocent animal—a vegetarian by birth. He never placed God on a cross, knows nothing of the art of war, does not practice lynch law and never dreams of assassinating his fellow beings. The day when science definitely recognizes him as the father of the human race the monkey will have no occasion to be proud of his descendants. That is why it must be concluded that the American Association which is prosecuting the teacher of evolution can be no other than the Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.
[A cynical article in the French press on the Scopes Monkey Trial, whether it will decide “a monkey or Adam was the grandfather of Uncle Sam.”]
— Newspaper
Article from a French daily newspaper on the day hearings at the Scopes Monkey Trial began, Paris Soir (13 Jul 1925), quoted in 'French Satirize the Case', New York Times (14 Jul 1925), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  America (39)  |  Bible (42)  |  Clinging (2)  |  Cruelty (6)  |  Charles Darwin (211)  |  Descendant (7)  |  Evolution (332)  |  Father (16)  |  France (8)  |  Human Race (27)  |  Hypothesis (147)  |  Lynching (2)  |  Monkey (25)  |  Mud (10)  |  Scopes Monkey Trial (4)  |  Society (81)  |  Understanding (222)  |  Vegetarian (3)  |  War (74)

Qualified scientists in Washington believe that the atom-blasting of Japan is the start toward heating plants the size of telephone booths for great factories, and motor-car trips of 1,000 hours on one gram of fuel. One expert estimated that with a few grams of uranium it might be possible to power the Queen Mary from Europe to the U.S. and back again. One of America’s leading scientists, Doctor Vollrath, said that the new discovery brings man’s attempt to reach the moon within bounds of possibility.
— Newspaper
The Maple Leaf (8 Aug 1945), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (62)  |  Attempt (39)  |  Belief (135)  |  Blast (3)  |  Bounds (2)  |  Discovery (354)  |  Estimation (5)  |  Europe (15)  |  Expert (16)  |  Factory (6)  |  Fuel (15)  |  Gram (2)  |  Great (59)  |  Hiroshima (9)  |  Japan (2)  |  Mile (10)  |  Moon (78)  |  Motor Car (2)  |  Possibility (67)  |  Power (98)  |  Reach (30)  |  Scientist (224)  |  Size (18)  |  Start (24)  |  Thousand (29)  |  Trip (4)  |  U.S.A. (4)  |  Uranium (13)

We may almost say of him [Joseph Aspdin, inventor of Portland Cement] what the epitaph in St. Pauls Cathedral says of Sir Christopher Wren: “If you seek his monument, look around.”
— Newspaper
In the Vancouver newspaper, 'The Sun's School Service: Portland Cement', The Vancouver Sun (14 Jan 1937), 12. No writer identified; part of the Sun-Ray Club feature “Conducted by Uncle Ben.”
Science quotes on:  |  Cement (7)  |  Epitaph (18)  |  Look (30)  |  Monument (11)  |  Sir Christopher Wren (7)



Quotes by others about Newspaper (10)

With a few honorable exceptions the press of the United States is at the beck and call of the patent medicines. Not only do the newspapers modify news possibly affecting these interests, but they sometimes become their agents.
'The Nostrum Evil,' Collier’s Weekly (7 Oct 1905). Reprinted in The Great American Fraud (1907), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Medicine (187)

Shut your eyes to the medical columns of the newspapers, and you will save yourself many forebodings and symptoms.
'The Sure-Cure School,' Collier’s Weekly (14 Jul 1906). Reprinted in The Great American Fraud (1907), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Diagnosis (48)  |  Symptom (7)

Printer's ink, when it spells out a doctor's promise to cure, is one of the subtlest and most dangerous of poisons.
'The Sure-Cure School,' Collier’s Weekly (14 Jul 1906). Reprinted in The Great American Fraud (1907), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Medicine (187)  |  Physician (171)

One could not be a successful scientist without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of scientists, a goodly number of scientists are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid.
The Double Helix (1998), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Dull (12)  |  Narrow-Minded (3)  |  Scientist (224)  |  Stupid (7)  |  Success (110)

Most people today still believe, perhaps unconsciously, in the heliocentric universe. ... Every newspaper in the land has a section on astrology, yet few have anything at all on astronomy.
[Realizing that his plasma universe may take a long time to penetrate the popular consciousness. When addressing a number of physicists with the first half of the quote, the groups was at first incredulous, but nodded agreement upon hearing the remainder of the quote.]
Quoted in Anthony L. Peratt, 'Dean of the Plasma Dissidents', Washington Times, supplement: The World and I (May 1988),196.
Science quotes on:  |  Astrology (19)  |  Astronomy (103)  |  Belief (135)  |  Unconscious (7)  |  Universe (274)

By virtue of the way it has organized its technological base, contemporary industrial society tends to be totalitarian. For 'totalitarian' is not only a terroristic political coordination of society, but also a non-terroristic economic-technical coordination which operates through the manipulation of needs by vested interests. It thus precludes the emergence of an effective opposition against the whole. Not only a specific form of government or party rule makes for totalitarianism, but also a specific system of production and distribution which may well be compatible with a 'pluralism' of parties, newspapers, 'countervailing powers,' etc.
One Dimensional Man (1964), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Coordination (4)  |  Distribution (15)  |  Economy (25)  |  Government (48)  |  Industry (47)  |  Manipulation (5)  |  Party (3)  |  Pluralism (2)  |  Production (70)  |  Rule (50)  |  Society (81)  |  System (67)  |  Technology (95)

What are the libraries of science but files of newspapers?
Excursions, 203. Excerpt in H.G.O. Blake (ed.), Thoreau's Thoughts: Selections From the Writings of Henry David Thoreau (1890,2005), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  File (2)  |  Library (22)  |  Science (850)

I suppose that the first chemists seemed to be very hard-hearted and unpoetical persons when they scouted the glorious dream of the alchemists that there must be some process for turning base metals into gold. I suppose that the men who first said, in plain, cold assertion, there is no fountain of eternal youth, seemed to be the most cruel and cold-hearted adversaries of human happiness. I know that the economists who say that if we could transmute lead into gold, it would certainly do us no good and might do great harm, are still regarded as unworthy of belief. Do not the money articles of the newspapers yet ring with the doctrine that we are getting rich when we give cotton and wheat for gold rather than when we give cotton and wheat for iron?
'The Forgotten Man' (1883). In The Forgotten Man and Other Essays (1918), 468.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemist (5)  |  Article (7)  |  Assertion (16)  |  Belief (135)  |  Chemist (47)  |  Cotton (3)  |  Cruelty (6)  |  Doctrine (32)  |  Dream (39)  |  Economist (3)  |  Eternity (20)  |  Fountain (6)  |  Glory (17)  |  Gold (20)  |  Gold (20)  |  Good (77)  |  Happiness (56)  |  Harm (17)  |  Iron (32)  |  Lead (33)  |  Money (87)  |  Person (32)  |  Process (97)  |  Richness (8)  |  Ring (6)  |  Supposition (25)  |  Supposition (25)  |  Transmutation (10)  |  Unworthy (4)  |  Wheat (3)  |  Youth (31)

Physical misery is great everywhere out here [Africa]. Are we justified in shutting our eyes and ignoring it because our European newspapers tell us nothing about it? We civilised people have been spoilt. If any one of us is ill the doctor comes at once. Is an operation necessary, the door of some hospital or other opens to us immediately. But let every one reflect on the meaning of the fact that out here millions and millions live without help or hope of it. Every day thousands and thousands endure the most terrible sufferings, though medical science could avert them. Every day there prevails in many and many a far-off hut a despair which we could banish. Will each of my readers think what the last ten years of his family history would have been if they had been passed without medical or surgical help of any sort? It is time that we should wake from slumber and face our responsibilities!
In On the Edge of the Primeval Forest, trans. C. T. Campion (1948, 1998), 126-127.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (7)  |  Awakening (3)  |  Civilization (84)  |  Despair (12)  |  Doctor (54)  |  Europe (15)  |  Hospital (21)  |  Ignoring (2)  |  Illness (9)  |  Justification (18)  |  Medical Science (3)  |  Medicine (187)  |  Million (27)  |  Misery (10)  |  Operation (54)  |  Responsibility (23)  |  Slumber (2)  |  Suffering (18)  |  Surgery (28)

I've been very involved in science literacy because it's critically important in our world today. ... As a public, we're asked to vote on issues, we're asked to accept explanations, we're asked to figure out what to do with our own health care, and you can't do that unless you have some level of science literacy. Science literacy isn't about figuring out how to solve equations like E=MC². Rather, it's about being able to read an article in the newspaper about the environment, about health care and figuring out how to vote on it. It's about being able to prepare nutritious meals. It's about being able to think your way through the day.
As quoted in 'Then & Now: Dr. Mae Jemison' (19 Jun 2005) on CNN web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Article (7)  |  Citizenship (4)  |  Environment (70)  |  Equation (45)  |  Health Care (3)  |  Literacy (4)  |  Meal (8)  |  Nutrition (11)  |  Read (29)  |  Thinking (163)  |  Vote (7)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
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Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
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Alfred Wegener
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- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
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Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
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- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
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